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Full text of "Pacific Rural Press (July-Dec. 1885)"

^=T^ 




JJa£ - Ca '"°"»a State Library 




W *^fiff W ' ,0m ' a :' d J imo thijs obtained, 
the above number in the Hester of Bool* 
which i» alwai/x open to inspection. 

Extract from the Political Code. 
Sm;t 1( ,n 229B. Books may be taken from the Library 

*»-TheJForegoing Regulations will be strictly enforced. «* 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/pacruralpres30u 




TWENTY PAGE EDITION. 



Vol. XXX-No. 1.1 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 4, 1885. 



I $3 a Year, in Advance 

I SlKOLK C'OPIEH, 10 CTS. 



Jackson's Advice to a Young Farmer. 

It is just as well, while the mind naturally 
reverts to the old heroes of the republic, to 
draw from their lives and words lessons for 
practical application. Fortunately for the 
guidance of later generations there 
are many such lessons to be drawn, 
and no doubt they have been one 
of the richest legacies from the olden 
time which subsequent generations 
have inherited. In the correspond- 
ence of the fathers of the republic 
which lias been handed down to de- 
scendants, is a mine of truth and 
valuable suggestion which is not yet 
worked out. 

We have it in mind to present in 
this connection a few sentences from 
the correspondence of one of the 
heroes who, though he did not share 
in establishing the republic, did 
much to maiutain it in its integ- 
rity — Andrew Jackson. A grand 
nephew of Andrew .luckson, Mr. 
Andrew Jackson Coffee, is living in 
Ban Francisco, and among his treas- 
ures are letters from the relative 
whose name he bears. One of these 
has a paragraph which contains an 
old truth, but one which, in view 
of the smaller profits which are ac- 
cruing to agriculturists now-a-days, 
it will be pertinent to recall in 
Jackson's words, as follows: 

To pass this life independently, 
one thing you must strictly ob- 
serve — that is, always to live within 
your own means. Our real wants 
are but few, when our imaginary 
wants are many, and never let your 
imaginary wants involve you in 
debt, remembering that a man in 
debt is really a slave, and subject 
to insult and injury from his credit- 
ors. Therefore shun indebtedness 
as one of the greatest evils in life. 
By industry and strict economy, 
living within your means, you wi'l 
be independent of the world and 
happy, when a contrary rule will 
lead to penury and want and wretch- 
edness to you and your family. Keep 
this in mind; adopt the rule here 
laid down, and I will guarantee to 
you happiness and independence. 

You say you are about to buy a 
farm near Colonel Hutchings. If 
you have the certain means to pay 
for it without involving you in debt, 
and can buy at a fair price, which 
Colonel Hutchings will be able to 
advance you, then it will be well to 
purchase and settle yourself on a 
farm, but do not involve yourself 
for the purpose of a farm expecting 
to pay for it from the product of the 
farm. The failure of one crop, un- 
less you have other means, might 
ruin you. You might subject the 
farm for sale by the sheriff, and all 
your personal property with it, and 
thereby be left penniless. From these 
hints you will be the best judge whether to make 
the purchase of not. A farmer's, when clear of 
debt, is the most independent and happy life, 
but he must not go in debt anticipating his 
crops to meet it, or by the failure of a crop he 
may become involved in debt that may prove 
destruction to him. 1 then say, live within 
your means, exercise industry with a strict 
economy, and all will go well with you. 

This rule is a safe one. Like all rules, how- 
ever, it has exceptions. Many a man now has 
a good farm who would never have acquired it 
had he not assumed the risk of buying it upon 
credit, though a much greater number have in 



their life experiences vivid illustrations of the 
truth of Jackson's advice. Much depends on 
the man as well as on the farm. Hard 
work, strict economy, wise and enterprising 
action, are all requisite to success, and any one 
of them is apt to fail of its result without the 



Do not expect that land will return several 
times i^s value every year in any crop what- 
ever. Do not expect that a few acres in fruit will 
enable you to buy a Nob-hill mansion and keep 
you in idleness during the rest of your life. The 
right kind of a man can clear a farm from debt 








A SOLDIER OF THE CONTINENTAL ARMY, 1776 



I co-operation of the others. Most failures have 
| resulted from indulgence in visionary ideas, 
i which count hypothetical profits and lead one 
i into speculative agriculture. It is in this di- 
j rection that many young men, and many old 
men, too, find pitfalls from which they cannot 
I emerge. 

All the lessons of the day in agriculture favor 
cautious and well-considered action. Do not 
think that caution means stupidity, r that con- 
servative behavior means to do nothing. Let 
I wisdom prevail in all plans and investments. 



and yield him money besides, but let it not be 
forgotten that in most cases nine-tenths of the 
credit is to be given to the man rather than to 
the farm. For this reason tho general warning 
of Jackson to beware of expecting the farm to 
pay for itself is of value. Such advice to most 
people is the best which can be given. 



Tkrkikic storms have prevailed recently in 
the provinces of France. The destruction of 
property by winds and floods has been enor- 
mous, Fight persons were killed by lightning. 



Soldiers of the Revolution. 

The soldiers of the Revolution have furnished 
historians, orators and poets, with their most 
stirring themes. Their heroism, their bravery, 
devotion and self-denial have all been fully set 
forth, and looking at. them in the 
light of their ultimate success and 
the blessings which have accrued to 
us and to the world through their 
deeds, it is easy to forget that they 
sometimes grew hungry and cross 
like other men, and that their com- 
manders had sometimes almost as 
much trouble to keep them in their 
places as to beat the enemy. 

The engraving on this page s-hows 
one of the old Continentals at the 
outbreak of the war in 1 7 7' > . His 
equipment is fresh and complete. 
It was afterwards that the words of 
the poet--"the old Continentals, in 
their ragged regimentals" -would 
suit the case. Though the ideal 
Continental shown in the engraving 
is often taken as a type of the sol- 
diery of the Revolution, it is a 
mistake to think that BUcfa a beauti- 
ful martial outfit was common. Ac- 
cording to Bryant's history the army 
of Washington was made up of the 
most diverse material, with no uni- 
formity in arms, dress, discipline or 
manners. Those known as the 
Continental regiments were "nlisted 
in the first instance under the rcgu 
lations of the Continental Congress, 
and served iu its pay and under its 
authority. They corresponded to 
our modern "regulars," though at 
that date their term of service was 
only a year. They were mainly 
from New I'.ngland, having re- 
enlisted during the siege of Boston 
to serve through 177<>. The soldiers 
represented all classes of society. 
Among officers and men were clergy- 
men, lawyers, physicians, plauters, 
merchants, farmers, mechanics, 
tradesmen and laborers, mostly na- 
tive Americans, of good English 
blood, with a sprinkling of (ier- 
mans, .Scots, and Irishmen. Most 
of them were indifferently equipped. 
The old Hint lock piece was the 
common arm; bayonets were scarce, 
and so also were uniforms. The 
two regiments which made, per- 
haps, the best apj earance on parade 
were Small wood's Marylanders and 
Haslet's Dela wares. The Delawsra 
men wore blue uniforms, looking 
not unlike the Hessians; those from 
Maryland were clothed in scarlet 
coats turned up with buff. The 
I'ennsylvanii and Maryland riflemen, on 
Washington's recommendation, wore long hunt- 
ing-blouses and pantaloons, some in white, 
Borne in black, and still others. in green. Rut 
the larger number of the troops were in citi- 
zen's clothes. The officers wore distinguished 
by different colored sashes and cockades. 
Washington wore blue and buff, and was al- 
ways neatly and often elegantly dressed. 
Washington's army contained good material. It 
was little else, however, than a pome of armed 
citizens, bravo and determined. 



PACIFIC ^URAto f RESS. 



[July 4, 1885 







mmHie tor lhk< 







To Oregon by Wagon— No L 

Ei'lTi-Ks Pees-:— Mood* j morning, after 
having fi nil hid up some work at boaae, we got 
oar traps m a pile, and baring everything 
ready we brought the spring wagea to the back 
doer, loaded np, bid the family good-by, sad 
started for Oregon. This was start No 1. We 
then drore down to brother's place and took in 
his traps, sail good by again, and this was start 
No. £ We now drore to Plymonth and 
began to feel that we really were under way. 
Mere we took on a few more ceceaaariea and 
made the third and last start. We were now 
fairly off for Oregon, and although we often re- 
peated the words of that emigrant we hare 
beard so much about, we did not paint them on 
the aide of the wagon aa he did. The words 
referred to are '"Oregon or bast." 

Three miles from Plymouth we overtook J. 
Kail and his party, who were also on the road to 
Oregon, bat would not travel with as as they 
bad their families and woo Id travel slowly, 
while our* was to be a flying trip. The ana 
was now getting well down in the west. We 
at first Ihwihl of camping near Brighton, bat 
finally coo-: laded to go through to Sacramento. 
We reached the city abort II o'clock, pot np 
oar horses and went to bed. 

Rising early next morning we soon discovered 
that some tramp bad helped himself to a can of 
lard and one of our pies. We did not care for 
the pie, bat the plate it was on and the bud we 
did not think be really nee d e d, and we did. 
However, we soon replaced them, and Laving 
fallen in with the doctor (all well-regulated 
parties have a doctor •, .who just wanted to go 
the same way, we again net oat on oar journey. 
< »ur route led us throagh the pleasant town of 
Woodland, the county seat of Yolo county. 
Pressing on we made Dunnigans Tuesday night, 
where we camped oat without making a fire. 
The next day we paaaed through several small 
towns, and reached San Jacinto in good camp- 
ing time. This camp was on the bank of the 
Sacramento river at the w ell-Known ranch of 
the late 1 »r. Glenn. We dropped the lines into 
the clear waters of the river, bat caught no fist. 
We managed to bag enough wild doves, how- 
ever, for supper. 

The weather was pleasant now aiter a day or 
two of north wind and we had a very pleasant 
camp that nijht. Bat the next morning, just 
as we were about to start, it commenced to 
rain lightly, and before we had gone a mile we 
met an army of headers with their teams and 
wagons hurrying to shelter, and noticed that 
they were pretty well soaked. The prospect 
for ns was rather gloomy bat we held our 
coarse, and being provided with a good wagon 
sheet we managed to keep dry, and reached a 
camping place a mile or two north of Tehama, 
in a thicket of woods and brash. There was no 
water at this place except that which was fall- 
ing from above, and we carried a bucketful 
about a mile to get our supper with. 

Resuming our journey in the morning, which 
proved to be clear and pleasant, we traveled to 
Red Blutf, laid in a supply of powder and shot 
and then made our way orer the hills to Jclley's 
ferry, 12 miles above Red Bluff. 

Speaking of distance reminds us that no two 
T*rsons ever tell ns the distance to a given 
place alike, and we were astonished at the 
ignorance of some of toe settlers with regard 
to roads and places at a little distance. 

Soon after leaving Red Bluff we sighted a 
hare, and being in need of meat for supper Old 
Tip took the rifle and fired, but only frightened 
the hare a little; then he fired again and again, 
aad finally called on the doctor to try his hand 
at it. But the doctor could not hit him, so I 
called to them to come and bold the horses and 
let me show them how to kill the hare, who 
still stood in the road. Before I could get a 
shot the hare ran down the road near the 
wagon, and the doctor took tbe shotgun and 
killeu it. 

We want to remark here that we saw enouc-h 

wheat in the last two dsys to feed the people "of 
California a long time. We passed in one place 
60 miles of wheat with scarcely a break in the 
whole distance, and we judged it to be a vrey 
fair crop most of tbe way. 

We crossed the river at Jelley's ferry and 
made our way up the river to Ball's ferry, and 
here we met our old friend Chas. fireen. We 
accepted his invitation to spend the night with 
He is pleasantly located on Ash creek 



floor aafll nrniv-d on the east end of town, and want water, apply for it, and always keep a 

took the "Tsmarack route, ' as it ia<«lled, over little cash ahead on the company's books. If 

•. - - ■_■ : ; .-n-.v s-. •-: neighbor ices a.-t want :t te need : :-t ar- 

ply- 
valley is a beautiful place in tbe L orn is looking remarkably well, yet s-sne of 
TOcntains, and is about three and a half miles our farmers are not through planting We 
long. There is a good hotel here, kept by Dr. have corn in all stages of growth, from tbe 
Pierce, also a store and several other buildings, roasting ear to ;ast peeping oat of the ground. 
Tne road through the valley is level. Then we Fruit is a heavy ?rop, and oor fruit raisers are 
bad six miles easy down grade ^nd then two just waking up to the necessity of driers. 
' miles more to Pitt river. There is a beautiful Santa Ana, Lo-- Am§tk»Om. E. GallVT. 
waterfall in Berney creek, where tbe water falls 

M5 feet. But we' did not know where to look Urban Finns at Sacrament o. 

for it, as it was off the road a short distance. 

We passed a man on the road, who, with his Ya>v**.- Pxxs=:— A few davs since I took a 

fami.v, ha 3 a narrow escape. He was driving „ , „ . . * . 

»Wti>e r:*d and did not notice a man cho£ strM the levee that forms the n:r.hern 

ping a tree by the roadside, and the tree boundary of our city, from l>>th to 21st s treet, 

I teO across his wagon and struck his boy, a lad md was much pleased with what I observed in 

°* 13 years, and injured him so severely that the wlJ . of fnl it culture and other ind uces. 



him. 



about six miles from Anderson, on the east 
side of the river. He has turned out to be a 
regular rancher. 

After leaving Green's we passed several 
email farms along tbe little valleys of the 
upper .Sacramento. The soil is good, aa are 
most of the crops, in this vicinity. We 
crossed Bear creek, a fine stream of clear, cool 
water. Toe hills around us appeared to be 
green, but whether it was grass or weeds we 
could not tell from tbe road. A cold wind 
blew in our faces from the north. Mt. Shasta 
loomed up in the distance ahead of us covered 
with snow, while on our right was Lassen peak 
also capped with snow. Eight miles from 
Greens we came to Millville on Cow creek 
which we crossed on a bridge 200 feet long 
Millville ia quite a large town in a small but 
good farming district. We did not go into the 
town, but toro*d off to the right pear the Urge 



of sometning better to eat, woald devour the 
blossoms of an isolated orange tree, aa charged 
in the Press, but with our early vegetation 
and warm winters, there ia very little danger. 
They have been here two years and I have not 
seen anything of the kind. Gao. Smith. 
Sam ra/fro. 

We know the English sparrow has friends, 
but has a decidedly bad aaaae among agricult- 
urist?, nevertheless. The following item which 

we just happened to aee in the Gard*-*,r- 
JsfowfA for June will give a hint of ha ill-fame 

The Knglfsh Spajibow.— The English fruit 
growers are loud in their denunciation of this pot. 
Miss Ormerod. a well-koowo entomology t. has sen: 
Sio to a society established for their destrutuco. 



1 will give you a few notes. The 
worthy of notice is that of Mr. Jol 
It lies just outside and adjoining th< 
16th street and baa been under cultiv 
30 years. A pear orchard of some 
gives promise of an abundant crop, 
these trees are 30 years old, are still 



firs: 



>:-m« of 
■ ig; rous 



for a time his life was despaired of. 

From Pitt river to Cayton valley ia two miles. 
We camped there on the place of Mr. Bos worth, 
formerly a resident of Napa valley. There are 
six families in Cayton and all appear to be doing 
well We saw gooseberries, currants and other 
fruits all doing well. At this camp we baked 
r.rst ::' tread, ani i: was a fair speit- 
men of bachelor camp life. We bought oau for *° d he4U hr :i « r , to continue so M 

one and one-half cents per pound and all along «■*»>• r**™ to <*»•- Kider is engaged 

our route we found hay, barley and oau cheaper ^ ai ^ v ^ a J i J^S. T *^ fire ' 

than we could buv them in Sacramento. 

From Cayton valley we piswfi through a 
level tract of land covered with yellow pine, 
and then crossed Dry creek flat and Bear flat. 
There we missed the road. We passed right in 
this section 60 miles of splendid timber. From 




Native Grapes of the 
-No. 2. 

[Br T. V. Mi 



United States 



JL Se 1 



part of whicr. r.as been pan:ei the 
present season. He is also breeding tborosgj**. 
bred Berkshire bogs, of which be keeps from 
S to 12 large breeding sows, selling the pigs 
when they are three to six months old, and for 
which he receives orders from all parte of the 



Cayton to McCloud 



•JO miles. The State as well as from Oregon. That these r.oga 



United ^tates fish hatchery is situated on this 
river (or creek ■ below where our road crossed. 
Mt. Scarpa was then 16 miles distant and rose 
up very high and cold locking before us. We 
traveled up grade five or six miles over a sandy 
road and camped at the base of Mt. Shasta. 
We had no hay and did not find any grass for 
our horses, but we bad plenty of barley and 
water and managed to get through the night 



are as one specimens aa can be found on this 
coast, the numerous premiums awarded at the 
S ate fairs for a number of rears past plainly 
testify. 

The next plaee to mention is that of Mrs. 
Hooker. It is situated. ;ust east of Agricul- 
tural Park — is inside — and adjoins the levee 
from Bi to -25ih street. Some ten years since 
this lady was left a widow, with a family to 



There was a hard form on the mountain that provide for, and an estate badly encumbered: 
night: it rained some on us. but did no harm but with an energy and pluck worthy of all 
except making it uncomfortable for the horses, pr*"*, she has cleared the place of all in- 
Kext morning we hitched up and started for deb ednese, and has at this time one of the 
Shasta valley, traveled up grade four or five mAn J fin « best paying places in Sacra- 
miles over sandy road when a storm of sleet mento. Her orchard contains five hundred 
and snow set in, with a cold wind in our faces, trees, principally Bartlett pears, on which a 
This storm lasted about an hour, when we beavy crop is now hanging. This crop, with 
began to descend in hot haste glad to get away 3 .°<W * lb. boxes of asparagus, cut the pre*ut 



from old Shasta. I. E. Davis. 

Cftlapoi Ml*. Ortyon, Janat lgtk. 



The Advantages of Irrigation. 



season, makes the property a very paying in- 
vestment. 

Tbe next, and last place to which I will : . I 
attention in this letter, is that of our late Post* 
master Hopping, now deceased. It adjoins trie 
Hooker property on the eastern side. Tbis is 
Emtob> Press:-I nod that the great bug- one of the flnest places in or about Sacramento, 
bear of people at a distance is our irrigation. I and under the intelligent supervision of Mr. 1. 
prop.ose to give tacts. I own 10 acres, all set siexter, the foreman, is now paying — and has 

to fruit. One rear ago we had rain enough, so d K 0ne 80 for ,» Dn ™ b " of . J^**™ -1 ^ pr ^ 9 

T ,. , . . Zr . ' 6 ' the proprietor. There is an orchard of 3,000 

I did not irrigate. This past Apr.l I ungated Bartlett pear trees, nine years old, on whi r, 

the whole once. It took two days water 'one- the estimated crop of the present season Is on6 

half head) at a cost of three dollars for water hundred and fifty tons. 

and two days' work. That includes all for two • M *° P™*^* cultivation, etc., this orchari 



yeare, with the exception of two or three times 
irrigating rosea, blackberries, etc., one-half hour 
each time, at a cost of about 10 cents per time. 
I have 110 varieties of roses, IS varieties of 
geraniums and other flowers, and I manage to 
keep them in bloom tbe entire year. 

In setting out a new vineyard or orchard, we 
usually run tbe water on at the time of setting 
to settle tbe earth, and afterwards irrrigate. 



has been kept in perfect order, from its 
planting, showing plainly to all who may 
see it, that persistent effort intelligent.; 
applied brings success in fruit growing- 
Many, if not most of the orchards in tne 
vicinity, aie now or have been affix* ed with the 
scale. Some of them badly so. In tLU 
orchard it has been almost • exterminated 
by spraying with a solution of coal oil 



sometime* once and sometimes twice, in order lnd *" h * le °j l ?*P- In so . me ^stances, a. 

an experiment, the pure coal oil was thrown on- 
to the trees, and those so treated seem to i-e 
doing quite as well, if not more so than those 
trees on which the mixture was used. 

There is on this place twenty acres of as par 
agus, from which has been cut the present sea 
son 3,500 fifty-pound boxes of that vegetable. 
The most of it has been marketed in San Fran 
cisco. A part of this twenty acres was planted 
thirty years ago, yet it produces quite as heav- 
ily as that planted later. The crop has been 



to insure a good growth the first season. At 
presen: I am inclined to think that our vine- 
yards are better if not irrigated at all after 
they are once established, unless it should be s 
remarkably dry winter, and then one winter's 
irrigation is sufficient. 

II we raise a succession of vegetables, such as 
green peas, new potatoes, etc., we must irrigate 
each time just before planting. Wetting the 
land once thoroughly just before planting en- 
sures a good crop with the exception 



r — — ~»- h i ii i » i,i ■ or corn. 

Summer planted com needs one irrigation just the t ame for man 5' - vear8 > v »rj""g only 

about tbe time of earing. few boxes from year to year. 

Each l'i-acre farm should have from three- There are many other places in and around 

fourths to an acre of alfalfa for the cow, chick- ?"!. c, * y tnat a } i 4 bt . °* mentioned and may !>r 



visited at another time. 

Sacramento, 



R D. Harknes-. 



The English Sparrow. 



ens and horse. That needs the water turned 
on several ti mes during the season on our fruit 
or uplands. The most of our land will produce 
one good crop without any irrigation. In or 
dinary seasons the second or third crop has to 

be irrigated. We have moist land that pro Ei.itors PREss : _The very useful bird (es 

Z^o^i^SlFuF^JZ Pecially to fruit-growers, the "house spa™ 

cutting. I know of a piece that has been cut t l' aA *' r <*om- *tiru-\, known [in this country as 

11 times in one year. Will some of our friends th e English sparrow, is the bast friend to man 

mn^tir 1 H fi £ff g ju « tigUre 004 how of a11 the bird8 - The >- were fi "t imported bate 

M a COt 6Very NeW Y ° rk iD 1SC " 2 ' and 80011 beared the sbrub- 

morning and fed green every day. bery of the Park of all worms and injurious 

»o foolish as to think that irriga- insects, and wherever introduced in the UUn 

taon is preferable to rain, which comes when one , tic cities thev have proved of like service 

doe. not want it I came through the San Joa- They are domestic birds, as their name im- 

IriUw t£ A Sh ° r K* tlm S **° Wh 1 re ? he >" are Buf - P He8 - * nd 8eldc " n ^ and " from the home of 

mS^f^St^T* M *^ n a - They have been at my place no, 

Tn^^ll 1 7 T ■ 0me ° f mj thou e bt s. two years, and I have watched tbemverv cW 

Turn that stream of water out over the valley ly, and have never found them dou* an* 

and cut it up into 5, 10 and JO-acre lets. Sell to harm g aD> 

actual settlers and just see what an independent Our native sparrows are somewhat d«tr„„ 

£?it rTT y ° U "t 11 ,^,- X r« figBre on tUe of ,rDit »nd blc^msTelrly ^Zl 

™" >ou please. I have lived where one other vegetable*. Especially so U the^whTte 

KWRriK J85X%«: 



Resu Mote tk 
1 S-w Orleans. Juoiv JO, and rursiutil 
estna ia the Pacmc lb ui Paaas.1 

Referring to tbe considerations mentioned ia 
the first part of this essay i RrR-tL Pkes>, June 
27, ISSo!, permit me to suggest a new classifica- 
tion of the species of native grapes of the Uni- 
ted States, according to natural a trinities and 
distribution 'including Vinifera for compari- 
son i. 

1.— Bipar-.a Group. 

Earliest to leave out, bloom and ripen ; hava 
thin diaphragms in the joints: grow very easily 
from cuttings ; roots wiry, penetrating, and 
perfectly resistant to phylloxera ; fruit free 
•rom rot ; vine endures great climatic hardships. 
Subdivisions ■ 

fa) Ripnria (proper | Riverside grape, fa- 
tends from Labrador into Texas, from Virginia 
into Montana : leaves sharp-toothed, glabrous 
or slightly pubescent: diaphragm thinnestof all 

'b> Xurrn itfjrirana. New Mexico or Wool- 
ly Riparia. Young wood and leaves wcolly 
Leaves more rounded and teeth shorter and 
less sharp than Northern Riparia: roots ei 
ceedingly wiry and penetrating : fruit ( which is 
very fine in quality ) and seeds much lacg»r 
than Riparia proper ; Western Indian Terri- 
tory, "Texas Pan Handle.'' New Mexico. 

(c) Jraoniea, Arizona grape. Leaves round, 
short-toothed, smaller than the New Mex- 
ico form ; leaves not so woolly, otherwise quite 
similar in fruit j upright habit of vine, often 
growing alone without support like a shrub. 

(d) Huf'ttrit, sugar or sand beach grape. 
Leaves remform, glabrous : fruit usually larger 
than Riparia : seeds small and almost round, 
with a small sharp beak : vine exceedingly 
b-ancbing, low and shrubby : roots very wiry : 
can be forced in o bloom at almost any time in 
the growing season by pinching or cutting 

' growth already made, tnus enabling one to hy- 
bridize it with late blooming kinds. 

2.-Cordifolia Group. 
Late to leave out, bloom and ripen ; young 
wood and leaves smooth j diaphragm thick ; 
fruit austere, nearly all seed and skin. Sub- 
divisions : 

(a) Cordi/olin, frost or sour winter grape. 
Leaves heart-shaped, with coarse, blunt teeth 
usually, though occasionally sharp ; article of 
one year, wood smoo h, usually mottled dark 
and light gray : diaphragm very thick ; cut- 
tings root with great difficulty ; fruit /m«y n', 
until sweetened by frost, generally unpromi*:rj>, 
to the experimenter. From New York, Wis- 
consin, iowa and Kansas to the < iulf, in bottoms 
mostly. 

lb) Pa! mat i or A'n'-ra, the latter the best 
name, as the young branches are always red 
when growing, while the leaves are not always 
palmate : seemingly a multiplied hybrid of 
Cordifolia with Kiparia : cuttings grow toler- 
ably. 

3- Cinerea Group. 

Leaves out, blooms and ripens after Cordi- 
folia; young wood angled: grows with diffi- 
culty from cuttings. Though seeming to have 
t>een introduced onto the continent later, a 
little, than the . Kstivalia, and not extending 
uite so far north, yet in cluster, smallcesa ot 
»erry, and habit of vine, it seems more nearly 
akin to Cordifo'ia than does .Kstivalia; hence I 
place it here, yet it is quite distinct — dia- 
phragm thick. Subdivisions: 

(a) Cin- r*a, ashy, or sweet winter grape. 
Kxtends from western Texas through Missouri, 
Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, New York (reported by 
A. J. Cay wood in Ulster county), to the At- 
lantic, and southward to South Florida. Often 
confounded with Cordifolia, owing to tbe aaaall 
fruit and late ripening, yet it is widely differ- 
ent. Leaves long pointed, with small, blur:* 
teeth, covered beneath las is the young wood) 
with a dense, ashy pubescence; above are acat- 
tering hairs, with a cobwebby appearance; 
young wood distinctly angled in Texas and, 
other western States, but obscurely so in 
I'lorida, where it approaches -Kstivalia in char- 
acter; clusters long, much compounded; berries 
-mall, rich vinous, very sweet, often running 
•n the must scale from 100 up to 1*30°. 

(bi AfoiUkota, mountain grape, of the hilly 
parts of central and western Texas. Seemingly 
aq old and much multiplied hybrid of Cinerea, 
with aome round, smooth leaved Riparia, aa it 
tiftjwa the eharacter of both species, but moat 
ot i :i*jere*; diaphragm not to thick M Cinerea, 



July 4, 1885.] 



fACIFie RURAb f RESS. 



and grow* from catting* more readily; bat 
few* and seed much Kke Cinerea, as also the 
leaf, though — 1TI11 rounder and aw. nut a i r, 
yrung wood angled and eabescent; blooms and 




^BtivaHs Group 
Blooms and 



•>e::re 



Raising Inenbator Chic-kens. 

Editor* Pees?: — Raising chickens is like *nv 
ananas; one most enter into it heart and 
aoml if one expects to succeed. Poultry raisers 
are mm* thing Eke poets, bom and not made. 
I Mi told bv one who lives near Santo Ann, 



- •• 7 '■ ^-i which mast 
leve^: under the boiler will have to be a hole to 
adjust the lamp, which should have the Urges: 
si. ei bhrher for this sirec br:->ier. 
boards la IS and long enough to slip under 
:.r-es '.-etween the blocks, finishes the " 
part. Take 4-foot lath, cot in two, planed on 
both sides and edges, nail these to strips of 
1x2 just the length of one-third the distance 
from the boiler to the extreme end of the pipes: 
three of these make the bottom of the brooder, 
the lath should be crosswise the pipes. Three 
boxes of the same length and CkI8, with a hole 
1-2 inches square cat in the top of each and cov- 
ered with wire cloth door: there should also be 
a partition crosswise in each box. Holes on one 
edge, with some soft woolen cloth finishes the 
brooder. In setting np, pat the lS-inch boards 
. under, and the slat bottoms on top of the pipes 

b ^ r iortoa, To., Ifpe. diaphragm, small i l — j i n of exceedingly large, spring, and wiD give »y«P~f^ l^^! and the boxes on top of the sl»Y bottom, lE 



freely mterntinglea with it when growing near. 

ibt fwmfrrm. Old World or Mediterranean 
grape, placed here to show its reUtiooship for 
comparison. It is chiefly an artin-al species, 
by hybridization, or combination ::' severe 
original species, scattered around the Mediter- 
ranean sea and found in Asia, Ihiaagh which 
similar forms extend to India. Bhrhhah. Siach. 

CSWifob *^ ^ ^* ; ?*ir^ ^ China and even into Japan. Grows easily :>:=: 

r- ng wood whe^oe, brownish red, otten be- tophra£m w»i rrav 

set with weak, snort prickles, and covered near ^— y*. . I T*t? _ 1 riVl J i i ^ .._ - - - 

5 joint, with a white or bluish, hite bloom, <* ^wish. roota soft and -««-■»■ 

Hfc» that upon bine plums, and can easily be Borandifona, 

rubbed off; cuttings grow with difficulty; roots Vnlpina, improperly ■ better would be Srmp- \ that nearly every one who has incubators have 

wiry, penetrating and resistant. Subdivisions: m L , umg. as Mawticota, Arizoniea and Noevo set them aside, because they were unable to 

(a) Norther* Form, New York to Missouri Mexicano have rounded leaver. This species raise the chicks after they were hatched, and 
mar. Leaves thin, rarely lobed: with a thin, stands out boldly separate frzzz. the "bunch" that raising incubator chicks was not a success. 
jUmt brown pwbfcrw* along veins or under grapes, in having small, asaueth lenTes, hard I say that they ma be raised, and that, too, 
ale; fruit small, but frequently fine. alender, warty wood, with no proper pith or successfully. I tried one for the first time this 

(b) Southto.4' rm, or Sorto*, Va., typ*. diaphragm, aanall chasten of exceedingly large, ' spring, and - 
gasjrtn medium fruit, whack like the Northern easily dropping berries, with a thick huthLij can do better I should be pleased to hear from 
is generally very astringent, but occasionally skin, much less variable than other species, them. A neighbor had an incubator of tiie 

very fine; much brown pubescence along the with no known nataral hybrids: leaves oat and ! make, and as he was not intending to 

veins or under surface of leaves, especially blooms the latest of aL', and the hardest of all use it this summer, I succeeded in obtaining the 

of the Florida specimens, in which it often ex- to grow from cartings. Found from Maryland use of it Xow for the result : Three hundred 

tends to the young tranches; Tennessee and westward in rich, warm wooded bottoms, to and two eggs were placed m the incubator on 

Virginia southward. Grayson coanto, on Bed river. Texas, thence the 4th of March Democrat chicks : the tern 

(e) Lmcemti, or Pw< Oak, T-sfi-r- fn-r —lbs ml in all the Soathern States, and perature varied somewhat above and below that 

form, of Missouri. Arkansas. Indian Terri- sore abundantly approaching the Gulf. The usually allowed, at one time reaching 11£» : the 

sory and "Texas. Largest leaved and largest Amir variety, ' 



will accommodate them until they are three 
weeks old. 

When three weeks old the boxes of the 
brooder were discarded and boxes made as fol- 
lows were used : Three boxes the same axe as 
the others, but twelve inches high instead of 
six, with lath tops tone inch and a half apart), 
also a partition crosswise in each box, which 
. would make six compartments for the chicks, 
on Scnpoeraoag river m | eggs were from common fowls, and not picked. Vq OOTfaiag whatever "was used over the boxes. 

and the artificial best was also stopped. This 
is all the arrangement needed until they are 
old enough to perch. Every morning the 
brooding boxes, slat bottoms and boards under 
the pipes should be removed, and the last two 
thoroughly scrubbed off and placed in the sun 
until evening. If you will follow the above 
plan carefully you may be almost certain of 



fruited of any of this group: and also more South Carolina is the nearest white yet known they were taken just as they were laid, and 
■early entitled to be called a species, yet all ' The original vine still stands alone bke an old quite a number were pallets eggs. 



It 



Toe number hatched was 21r> strong chicks. 
Four were unabVe^to break the shells, two died 
after hatching, one died when one day old, one 
was killed in opening the drawers, 42 showed 
no sign of hatching, and 36 were unfertile eggs. 

Their feed for the first four days was nothing 
but oatmeal, that known as the Eastern, or 
shoemaker oatmeal; this was spread on 



three' forms of -Estivalis are too much alike tree without support its support hi younger 

and too much intermingled to be set up as days having fallen away by ieciy . in the town 
equally distinct species, as any of the others ' of Seappernong. Thin species never mildews, 

named. Regarding the three types as one rota or s eems to have other enemies, 

species, K is probably more numerous in vines pleasantly flavored w heme ie i found, and 

and well-marked vines than any other. In Lin- a dehooas wine, 

cecumii, the pubescence a long the leaf veins is = 

less abundant and of a paler color than the Sc:h seems to me tie m:st hathra'. ahi 
southeastern form, and the whole under aide of 
the leaf has a bluish green cast, very peculi a r 
and distinguishing. The U aves c: this and the 
■wiIIm hii i ii form are often deeply and bean 

tifuDy lobed; fruit often red, sometimes nearly rably the rules of adaptation. In her north- 
white, western limits, are ■■iiath and woolly Ripa- 
Vulpina Group- ria, in her central belt of intermingled prarie 
Foxn Uawd yrapt*. Leaves densely pahes- j and timber, hills and plains, are smooth and 
cent or woolly beneath. This pubescence in woolly Riparia, MontacoU, Rupestm, Candi 
Labrusca and* Caribbea is often of a foxy-red cans, Cordifoba, .Estivalis and L inerea: in the 
color, and this is very probably the origin of drier limestone and sandy timbered regions ot 
the term Velpina, as formerly applied by Lin- her central and northern parte, are Candicans, 
na-us to this group, but which s om e how bat 

.free, very improperly been attached tott* ^ exc^velT^PPernoS and sweet milk: biscuit" should" never be used 

2™^SSr3 ^SaSHS k^E^^S 

rf^a-fi. hat^e. "thTvu" lesson from this distribution by the kTwn.a. «^ From^e S until they 

Dina mSu Tha« ze«rally^ar« frta% with hand of Nature herself . So we see, that tone »ere four weeks old their teed has been 

K^So? S EZSJ^ZLSL excea- entinentlv successful we must observe the laws "shorts^ bread and com bread m«ed I am 

_ » in tL^usta^ oTtTxL: flesh of adaptation. We can no more force a variety now feeding them .corn! wh^ and corn 
out, bl~L and ripen just out of any particular species to thrive equally cracked m a bone miU, 



i fal ilisssfii ilinn of oar grapes. To illustrate of brown paper on the bottom of the brooding- 
I natural distribution, I will only cite the great house, which will be described further on. It 
state of Texas, which isibeadof all others in »of great importance that every one nnds the 
number and vahse of species, and shows admi- water and learns how to drink. Common pie- 

1 pane are the nicest for them while small, and 
should be filled about half-full of water, and 
refilled often to keep the water fresh. 

To teach them to drink, pick up the chick, 
dip his bill into the water and set him into the 
wattr, and see that he stays there until he takes 
a drink himself. When it cares for more it will 
know where to find it. After they were four 
"has" Cx»rdifoa^.Kriviii"rnd Cmer^Tthen continue* days old, and until they were two weeks old 

their feed was nothing bat light wheat bread 



kely 
pulpy 



They leave I 



after Riparia, and before .Eitivalia. None of 
them are found wild west of the Alleghanies 
and north of the Ozarks. The three species of 
the group were evidently already developed 
before their introduction on the continent, as 
they occupy each a separate region. However, 
rmtanirsl analysis shows them to be nearly 



well anywhere than we can reverse the coarse 
of a river. By hybrid combinations we can 
produce varieties of greater adaptability to 
different localities, probably than with pare 
species. However, the chief advantage of hy- 
bridization, and one which no other process 
can secure, is a combination of desirable proper- 



and scraps from the 
table, and a healthier lot of chicks I have never 
Only one has been lost by sickness. 



Tee Brooder Heater 
Is one of my own make. It consists of two 
boilers sis inches in diameter, one 12 inches 
high, the other 2; the larger one has a metal 



The O'.d Hen and the Incubator. 
On page 375 "SisterSue" says: "There is noth- 
ing that can beat an old hen at raising chick- 
ens." * * * "That the care of two or three 
hundred chickeas is quite a harden." I used 
to think just as she does until I tried the incu- 
bator, and I find it no more work to care for 
200 "orphans" than the care of seven or eight 
hens with twenty chicks each, to say nothing 
of the time lost by the sitting hens, when they 
might be laying eggs, the trouble of setting to 
get them all started at once so as to be able to 
"double r.p" the chicks, the loss of eggs i chicks • 
by breakage from being disturbed by other 
hens. Then in feeding the young chicks to 
have the "old hen" step forward into the dish, 
and with about two strokes throw the feed into 
the dirt, is enough to disgust any one. 

Then again, she says : "The first broods I 
raised frcm my incubator were a great care, 
running after me and being under toot continu- 
ally." My brooding house is not over 30 yards 
from my dwelling, and yet not one chick has 
ever come near the house, all going in just 
the opposite direction. 

Again, she says : "There was one thing 
they' lacked that I could not supply, that was 
some one to scratch for them. " I find that if 
they are allowed their freedom on land where 
grass and weeds grow that they will scratch for 



stock in the past. The Caribbea in Jamaica 
identical with the Florida form. Subdivisions: 
(a) Labrmtra Ytdj>ima would be the proper 
name, as the common name is fox grape. It 
has the true foxy leavts. besides. B-dsci is 
applied to a European species entirely different 



allied, and they each seem to be of about equal ties, not existing in any one species, but com- 
of development from some common pletely in the genus scattered here and there 

among the different species. Bat miserably 
poor results may also be gotten by mixing the 
wrong "1"f» hence thorough a&juaintance 
with the species and good judgment must be 
exercised in selecting the proper species and I 
varieties of each to intermingle. Cordi- 
ThU%pec*es exteudsYlong the eastern slope of foba and Candicans most probably could 

never coalesce in*o anything valuable, bat 
eminently do combinations of the best Riparia, 
Kapestris, Arizoniea and Cinerea, with the 
large, tine-fruited .Estivalis. promise every- 
thing in the West and North, as we see 
indications in the skillful hands of Hermann 
Jaeger, of Missouri. Farther south, Riparia, 
.Estivalis, Cinerea and Ro undifolia are ample 
tor any southern experimenter, la the north- 
east, Labrusca with Vinifera have done won- 
ders, yet .-Estivalis, in the place of Vinifera, in 
the Delaware, and that new wonder, Ulster 
Prolific, has beaten ' he others altogether. 

Let ringing unprofitable changes upon Lib 
rusca and Vinifera cease, and put Riparia and 
.Estivalis, with Labrusca of the northeastern 
woods into servi:e as Messrs. C.ywo.d, Mar- 
vin and a few others are doing, ana better than 
a chance Clinton or Taylor will bless the effort. 

Attainmec: and Outlook - . 
I grow enthusiastic with the thought of the 
achievements in waiting for the intelligent 
originator. There are no less than 10 species 
ot grapes in the United States which possess 
great capabilities. From one or two species of 
apple, naturally small , astringent and unfit for 
food, what vast developments have come, as 



chimnev passing up through the center and themselves when they need it 
U inches below,' which has an isinglass window 



the Alleghanies from Maine to Georgia. Con 
cord, Ives, Catawba, Isabella, are popular ex 
am pies Tendrils are continuous, occurring at 
every joint in vigorous growth, while in ail 
other species of grape they are intermittent — 
skipping every third j .int. The cuttings root 
readily: diaphragms medium to thick: wood 
reddish brown; roots medium in hirdness and 
leas resistant to philloxera than most other 
American species. Though far less promising 
to the experimenter than several other =pe:ies, 
nearly all attempts at the amelioration of our 
natives have been bestowed upon this, as it 
was found in the older, settled parts and had 
large fruit. 

(b) Carina, (Callocsa by some Middle and 
SMth Florida. More woolly, especially on 
young wood, than Librusca, varying greatly 
from much alike Labrusca to Candicans. Fruit 
usually smaller and austere: diaphragm thick, 
cuttings grow poorly; wood reddish gray. 

(e) Candicatu, Mustang of Texas, Southern 
Indian Territory and Mexico near the Gulf. 
Young wood and leaves densely covered with a 
white, cobwebby wool; berries large to very 
large, in small to medium clusters: fruit pulpy, 
sweet and makes a wine of great body and 
durability, but the skin is exceedingly pungent, 
iwndiiin(i it unfit for eating: peculiarly fond of 




to allow the lamp to be regulated. The small 
boiler is placed on top of the larger, bat raised 
above it one inch and joined to the lower one 
by four one-inch tubes to allow the water to 
~~ from one boiler to the other. From tne 



those four long, broad tables in your hall here, 
diaphragm tii^ooT^ containing above 500 good varieties w^ attest I ^teV^thTW^boUerrstanding upright is 
till now the entire year is supplied with the a - tw . or r more feet long: this is to allow 
most appetizing and healthful of fruits. Still, gyj^g water. Just above the upper 

there remains large room for further improve- 
ment: then what latitude may we lend our fan- 
cies in the contemplation of this decern virate of 
vitis i life- giving > vines, which stretch forth their 
affectionate tendrils, as though they would bind 
up and beautify with luscious white, pink and 



gray; grows poorly from cuttings; roots pene 
bating and resistant: many hybrids with Ri 
paria and Ropes tris occur, as it blooms a few 
days later than they. Wild white 
have been found . 



boiler from this pipe is another one-inch pipe 

10 inches long, thence down t i the bottom ot 
lower boiler nearly. From this point is a pipe 

11 feet long | horizontal i, then back into the 
bottom, which will make a complete circula 
tion. The lower pipe should enter 



Mexico, purple festoons every home in our broad land. at - nt anglea the upper outlet pipe 
oto the It is a nting family, it is a loving genus. A 



Vinifera Grout). 
(Meaty-fruited fleshy rooted, (a I Calif or 
■sen, Pacific Slope, Oregon to 
Seems to have betm introduced onto 

continent from the westward, while all other few of its members have been the staying com- 
American species came from the soath or panions of man through all historic ages, and 
east. In leaf, wood, pith, diaphragm, roots, here, in our own glorious country, are added 
fruit and seeds, it embodies much of the char- half a score more still brighter member., , - 

actor of the foreign Vinifera. It is leas reels- unnumbered varieties of each to engage oar roof is covered with musun^ tne 



the boiler 



I agree with her in regard to oatmeal, and 
would not feed it to them except for the first 
day or two, to teach them to eat, as I find it 
difficult to get them to eat soft food when quite 
young. 

I, for one, never had any success in feeding 
young chicks uncooked corn meal, or in any 
shape cooked or otherwise >, until they were 
over one month old, and then only corn bread; 
as long as I feed them moist food, sweet milk is 
all that is used to moisten it. So far I have 
had no trouble with the chicks having the diar- 
rhea when fed and cared for as I have described. 
Mrs. Perkins on page 37.3 reports fatal results 
by feeding uncooked milk. I will state that I 
have never fed it to chicks otherwise. 

Loi Anytht Co. N. R. Wri.;ht. 

Hens and Chicks. 

Editors Press .- — It is rather late in *the 
season to write about the care of sitting hens 
and raising chickens, bat useful bints are al- 
ways timely. In this age of inventions too 
many people are led by the new ideas of arti 
ficial incubation, and have neglected that most 
primitive and natural of incubators, the 
"mother biddy/' It is a well-known fact that 
when a hen "steals her nest" she almost in- 
variably brings forth a full brood of fine healthy 
chickens, and but very few eggs ever remain 
unhitched. The reason is that the laws of na- 
ture relating thereto are more nearly complied 
with. Experience has taught me to reject large 
clumsy hens for sitters, as they break a larger 
number of eggs. Therefore, in selecting hens 
for sitters, I prefer those of medium or light 
weight, letting them set a day or two before 
placing the eggs under the hen. No more 
eggs should be put in the nest thin can be well 
covered by the hen. If too many eggs are put 
under the hen, which is a common fault, 
the chicks will be a long time in coming out of 
the shell, and when they are hatched will be 
in a very weakly condition and unite a percent- 
age of them will die, or if they do not die they 
will not develop into fine healthy chickens. 

ig the period of incubation the nest should 
be renovated once or twice while the hen is off 



Tne Brooding House , — 

Is SalS feet, 2 feet on one side and S on the During the period of incubation the nest should 
other "it has" a dirt floor, with i inches of sand 

ZT "l >L*t«m. * f~t of the lower edge of the the nest, as wis seeps ™« "T^' 

balance with At no time should the sitter be allowed to be- 
About come atflicted with vermin, as she will leave 

" become 



acter of the foreign Vinifera. It U less resis- unnumbered varieties of each to engage our roof is covered wun t ^8 artlicted with vermin, as she will lea 

tant to phylloxera than any other of our native acutest intellect and exercise our most cunning ' shakes th* house should iace tne a^. - frequently and the eggs will becor 

•paoies, Oougn more so than Vuufera. The fie*, drill, r«d, for infinite moulding by an under- 3 feet from the back, place the and pipe, then** trequent y an w ? ^ 

j* sometin^ -eaty like Vinifera, and the VOtor ' standing will, » with a pi«e of 3x4 under each end ot cmuea. 



4 



f ACIFie RURAb f RESS. 



[July 4, 1885 



Matrons of Husbandry. 

Correspondence on Grange principle!! and work and re- 
ports of transactions of subordinate Granges are respect 
fully solicited for this department. 

Corporations and the State. 

To the Master and Members of Temmcat 
Oramje:—! propose with your permission and 
that of the editor of the Rural Pkkss, to dis- 
cuss through the columns of that journal a lit- 
tle further the proposition to give to a corpora- 
tion the monopoly of all the waters of three 
counties in the San Joaquin valley to enable it 
ostensibly to aid in and provide for the irriga- 
tion of such lands in said counties as can be 
irrigated; but really to enable the said corpora- 
tion without owning a rood of the soil, to gather 
the rents and profits as fully and effectually and 
with far less expense to themselves than if they 
owned in fee every rood of land they irrigate. 
I see by the Butte Record that the members of 
the Legislature have petitioned the Governor to 
convene them in extra session so they may pass 
those so-called irrigation bills. It would seem 
that the record made by the Legislature was 
sufficiently infamous to satisfy any one, however 
great may be his desire to be deemed infamous. 
It would seem that the act of the Legislature 
giving to the railroad company, so far as they 
had the power to do it, the privilege of assess- 
ing themselves and of paying into the treasury 
of the State and of the county treasuries what- 
ever sums they pleased, coupled with that in 
famous attempt to bribe the horticulturists of 
the State to vote for the infamous amendment 
to the constitution, coupled with that other act 
of electing the chief of the corporation robbers 
to represent the great State of California in the 
United States Senate— a man who, if his 
election had been submitted to a popular 
vote, would not have received a hundred 
votes in the whole State outside of railroad in- 
fluence it would appear to the uninitiated 
that the above enumerated infamousacts Bhould 
satisfy the greed of any Legislature for infamy, 
however corrupt they might be. But it seems 
our honorable Legislature are anxious to do 
one more act of crowning infamy to round out 
anil finish up their career by turning over the 
finest portion of our fair State, bound hand and 
foot, to the tender mercies of a merciless cor- 
poration, for it to rob the inhabitants at will 
without let or hiuderance for years to ccne; 
till the inhabitants of the most beautiful 
and naturally the most fertile portion of our 
State shall be reduced to a condition worse 
than serfdom. The proverb says "a burnt 
child dreads the fire," and it is hardly to be 
thought that after the experience hU Excellency 
has had with extra sessions of the Legislature 
he will grant the prayer of the honorable mem- 
bers of the Legislature and convene them in 
extra session, even for so laudable a purpose as 
they have in view — even the giving of a goodly 
portion of the State to a corporation. 

That the waters of the San Joaquin valley 
should be systematically utilized for irrigating 
purposes, there can be no doubt but it should 
be done by the State. The State can do the 
work better and cheaper than a corporation 
can, and then if there is any profit in the busi- 
ness the whole people will share in it and not 
a favored few. It is high time the people 
should through their State and national govern- 
ments do all these things that corporations 
have heretofore done. It is high time that a 
stop was put to the granting of special privi- 
leges to a few to enable them to oppress the 
many. A. D. Nelson. 

Uijden, Utah. 

Rural Education. 

The following is an original essay read before 
florin Orange by George Wilson: 

There is no class of laboring men whose facil- 
ities for self-education are better than those of 
the 'farmer. By the term education I do not 
mean book training alone. Acquaintance with 
the dead languages and with the literature of 
Oreece and Rome are not worth as much to the 
farmer as expertness in handling wheat and 
horses. To know how to calculate an eclipse 
of the sun is an accomplishment which is not 
worth as much on a farm as to know how to | 
make good hay. It is not then to the curricu- 
lum of the schools I refer, but to that more 
substantial training which lits a man for suc- 
cessful agriculture. This includes some knowl- 
edge of soils and fertilizers, of grains, ani 
mals and the art of feeding, of climate and its 
effects on animal and vegetable life, etc. He 
also needs some knowledge of political affairs, 
of history and economic questions, which ef- 
fect public interest, and all of these require- 
ments the farmer'sadvantoge for obtaining is bet- ' 
ter than other laboring classes. The mechanics, \ 
merchants and clerks have little time for 
study, for when they are relieved from toil 
temptations lie on every side to lure them into 
idle pleasure or dissipation. The farmer works 
long in planting and harvest season, but after 
the crop is garnered he has many spare hours 
which may be turned to good account. The 
theater, the dram-shop and the bowling alley 
are not near at hand to lead him to idleness 
every time he steps out of his house. The pure 
air of heaven surrouuds his dwelling. He lives 
in an atmosphere of health and sobriety. His 
children grow strong in good qualities of head 
and heart. When the shadows grow long and 
night comes on, the noise and bustle of the 



town is not near to trouble the quiet of his re- 
pose. Thus farmers' sons should be educated 
and cultivated so that they may stand side 
by side with their city compeers, worthy of as 
high distinction and of as good personal address. 
It is necessary in this age that the farmer be 
equally educated with those of the mercantile 
class, and command an equal business stand- 
ing, and should move in as good society. 

The farmer's son may not make as grand an 
appearance as the merchant's son, in his fine 
apparel, which is in many cases all the charm 
they possess, or may not bow in accordance 
with the refined rules of etiquette or tip his hat 
with such precision, but frequently the brain 
lying underneath the broad- brimmed hat con- 
tains more culture and valuable information 
than the snug-fitting Derby of the merchant's 
son. There are exceptions, however. We are 
surrounded with decided advantages when com- 
pared with those of our fathers and mothers. 
It is mainly our own fault if we do not obtain a 
tairly good education, as we live in an age of 
school and popular literature. We are enabled 
through newspapers, books and magaziius, to ob- 
tain a vast amount of knowledge, if we only 
make the proper application. Our best litera- 
ture is published within the reach of almost 
every one. Then let us appreciate our advan- 
tages and thus grasp the golden treasures that 
lie all around us. 



Grange Items. 

Placerville O range had a grand reunion re- 
cently, in which Bros. Coulter, Overhiser, 
Flint, Hancock and others were visitors. The 
occasion is described as very pleasant and 
profitable. 

Crand Island Orange has just administered 
the third and fourth degrees for the first time 
in several years. Old members are renewing 
their allegiance and new ones applying for en- 
trance. The outlook for the work in that field 
is very promising. 

San Jose Orange is wide awake as usual. At 
a recent meeting the project to build a horti- 
cultural hall for the purpose of holding exhib- 
itions, and also for general headquarters of the 
several societies representing different depart- 
ments of agriculture, was thoroughly discussed 
and met with unanimous favor. A committee 
consisting of Frank Dunn, Cyrus Jones and H. 
O. Keesling was appointed to ascer'ain prob- 
able cost of lot and building suitable for the 
purpose, and Mrs. O. J. Albee, Mrs. Jos. R. 
Holland and Mrs. S. T. In. ill- were appointed 
to interview absent members and others, with 
a view of obtaining subscriptions if it is de- 
cided to build. 

The last picnic of St. Helena Grange was a 
notable success.' It was held on a charming 
site about two miles north of St. Helena, where 
spreading oaks and graceful madrones shaded a 
carpet of ferns. Aside from the charms of the 
feast there were other good features. Short ad- 
dresses were listened to from W. M. Win. 
Peterson, Hon. Owen Wade, Rev. Wm. Stevens 
and Prof. Rogers, and the afternoon wore away 
too quickly. A popular young member 
kindly brought his camera and took views of 
the picnickers, while another exhibited a large 
portfolio of interesting views of scenes from the 
war of the Rebellion, which were highly ap- 
preciated and enjoyed. 

Monument tor Ruel C. Gridley. 

EDITORS PRESS: — Stockton Orange will, on 
the Fourth of July, give lunch and ice cream 
at Masonic Temple to help Rawlin's Post,*:. 
A. B., raise funds to build a monument to K. 
C. Oridley, who raised $275,000 in 1864 by sell- 
ing his "famous sack of flour," paying his 
traveling expenses and turning every dollar 
over to the Sanitary Commission, till health 
and business were ruined. His unselfish devo- 
tion honored our State and humanity, and ve 
appeal to every calling on this coast to help 
place suitable recognition of his patriotic work 
on his grave ere the eyes of his life-partner are 
too dim to read a people's gratitude to one who 
did more than all others for wounded and sick 
soldiers. Rawlin's Post will have the "sack of 
flour" on exhibition at the lunch. Ladies of 
Stockton are canvassing for subscriptions from 
citizens and public schools. 

Stockton, Jnii<- SO, 1885. Mks. W. D. A. 



Co-operation Among Fruit-Growers. 

It is beyond question that much of the ex- 
pected prosperity to our fruit interest must 
come through co operation among fruit glowers 
for their own benefit. The report of the meet- 
ing of the State Horticultural Society on an- 
other page shows that the idea is gaining 
ground. We are glad to know that a meeting 
of fruit growers was held in the Grangers' Hall, 
Sacramento, on Saturday afternoon, to consider 
steps to improve the prices of orchard and vine- 
yard products. It was unanimously agreed 
that an association was necessary to protect 
themselves against middlemen, and a committee, 
c insisting of Dr. Hughson, E Greer, G. W. 
Hancock, P. H. Murphy, A. B. Burns, David 
Lubid, T. D. Ludkin, G. B. Green and J. H. 
Butter, was • ppointed to draft a form of or- 
ganization. The meeting adjourned to Satur- 
day. July 11th. 



jlGr^lCULTURAL I^OTES. 



CALIFORNIA. 
Fresno. 

Poultry is Orchards. — Republican : The 
presence of large numbers of chickens, turkeys 
and ducks in orchards and vineyards seems to 
be the most effectual means yet discovered for 
combating the number of insect pests which are 
taxing the ingenuity and perseverance of or- 
chardists and vincyardists. While these fowls 
will undoubtedly not keep vines and trees en- 
tirely free from pests, they render a vast 
amount of assistance in that direction. They 
are proving especially valuable in case of in- 
vasion by grasshoppers. Indeed, where this 
pest has not appeared in overwhelming numbers, 
fowls are the most effective remtdy yet dis- 
covered for theii destruction. Thousands of 
dollars have been saved to the fruit and vine- 
growers of this county the present season by 
the keeping of fowls in their orchards and vine- 
yards, and when the management of the fowls 
is better understood they can be made still 
more effective in case of a visitation by grass- 
hoppers or similar pests. The sooner the 
poultry is on the ground after the hoppers are 
hatched out the better, for the double reason 
that they are much easier caught when small 
and the fowls will eat two or three times the 
number that they will when they have reached 
maturity, hence i 1 : is advisable to watch closely 
the alfalfa, stubble ground or waste land, which 
are hatching grounds for the grasshoppers, and 
have the fowls at work before the hoppers are 
large enough to move into the Rejoining or- 
chards and vineyards. When the hoppers be- 
come older and more active, the early morning, 
when the pests are stiff with cold and slow to 
move, is the best time for fowls to get away 
with them. Ducks have not yet been used 
here much for this purpose, but are said to do 
very satisfactory work. They have the most 
insatiable apppetites for grasshoppers of any of 
the domestic fowls. The raising of ducks in 
itself is very profitable. Hopper fed ducks sell 
readily to the Chinese at from 75 cents to $1 
apiece. Fruit culture and poultry raising seem 
destined to become inseparable industries in 
this country. 

Blackkirps ami Hoppers.— June 24: The 
best grasshopper eradicators that we know of 
are to be found among the California birds. 
The blackbirds and several species of the wren 
are particularly valuable for this purpose. 
They may be found at all times of the day on 
the trees and in the grass searching not only for 
grasshoppers but other varieties of bugs. They 
never attack fruit when they can get insects. 
As an illustration, in one part of \V. M. 
Williams' nursery where afield of oats had been 
grown and cut for hay, the grasshoppers 
hatched out in myriads. A tbek of blackbirds 
that had been in the vicinity discovered them 
and went to work on them, and to day hardly 
a hopper can be seen. It seems to us that our 
fruit-growers would do themselves service by 
protecting certain classes of birds. The lin- 
nets and a small sparrow are the only birds 
that we know of that do much harm to the 
fruit crop, about all the others overbalance any 
harm they may do to fruit by catching insects 
that arealike injurious to fruit and trees. 

Los Angeles. 
A Dealer's Views on Raisins.— Orange 
T rib iiw , June 27: Mr. Isador Jacobs, of the 
firm of A. Lusk & Co., San Francisco, called to 
see us last Tuesday. In an interview with the 
gentleman, who is making a tour of the raisin 
districts of the State, he said that the yield 
i promised to be large all over the State. Prices, 
however, he thinks will be higher than last 
year, for several reasons. Advices from Ma 
laga, dated the 7th inst., were to the effect that 
the crop was looking poorly, and that, coupled 
with the cholera in Spain, would, to a large ex- 
tent, limit importation. Large houses Kist, 
who had never handled anything but imported 
raisins, were now being convinced of the fact 
that some or our California London Layers 
were equal to the best impoited, as evidenced 
by one house in New York City, who last year 
bought from the firm 10,000 boxes of choice 
London Layers, as an experiment. This year 
the same firm has already engiged 25,000 boxes 
from them. Mr. Jacobs estimates the approxi- 
mate yield at about 400,000 boxes in round 
numbers, of which his firm will handle about 
200,000 luxes, having control of the Briggs' 
vineyard of 2,000 acres, the Butler vineyards 
at Fresno, the Woodland and American river 
vineyards, and the entire output of the Rock- 
lin Vineyard Co. Mr. Jacobs says, however, 
that raisins in the northern portion of the 
State are inferior to those of Orange, Fresno 
and Kiverside, and says that the outlook for the 
future of the raisin market has changed in the 
past two years, so that even if the imported ar- 
ticle rules a little lower our best raisins will 
rule higher, so as to equalize the prices; instead 
of the imported article selliLg from 70 cents to 
SI. 00 higher than ours, the difference should bs 
slight, if any, and this fact is now beginning to 
be appreciated by the people East, and it is 
proved by articles being continually published 
by the Eastern press, speaking in very flitter- 
ing terms of our California product. Mr. 
Jacobs suggests that, as the future of our raisin 
business is now bejoming assured, it behooves 
the growers to maintain and improve continu- 
ally the quality and standard of their raisins, 
| and be careful about the packing and grading, 
1 and then our raisins will "make a market for 



themselves." The best brands to pack are only 
the London Layer and Loose Muscatel, as the 
latter is also very popular East. Let the Lon- 
don Layer be extra choice, and all raisins 
packed to weigh the full twenty pounds, rather 
a few ounces over than light. 

Among the Driers. — Santa Ana Standard, 
June 27: Tuesday afternoon we took a drive 
to see how the country is looking and what the 
people are doing. We went by Orange and 
stopped in to see the fruit-drier of Pixley & 
Arne. It is t 1 c American drier, and though it 
does not dry to exceed 1,200 pounds of green 
fruit a day, yet it is turning out handsome 
fruit. The gentleman informed us that green 
apricots would produce about one-eixth of its 
weight in dried fruit. They had all the work 
they could do and run their drier day and night. 
From Orange we went to Joel Parker's to see 
the famous drier invented by Gilbert Dean of 
Santa Ana. It is a large drier and a tip-top 
concern. The fact that it was constructed un- 
der the supervision of Mr. Dean, who is one of 
the finest machinists we ever saw, is sufficient 
evidence that it is a grand success. We found it 
running in good order and doing splendid work 
] from the start, though so far the machine has 
I never had enough fruit to run it to its full ca- 
pacity. It can dry from five to seven tons of 
green fruit per day. The fruit is evaporated by 
hot air driven into the drier by means of a little 
engine, and from careful experiments Mr. Dean 
has got the work down to a fine figure. Fruit 
should be perfectly ripe before putting in the 
drier, and then the yield is from one-sixth to 
one-seventh of the original weight in dried fruit. 
They employ 12 cutters to prepare the apricots 
for the furnace and pay at the rate of 33J cents 
per hundred pounds for cutting or pitting and 
placing on the trays. This work is all done 
by women, who can earn from §1 to SI. 50 a day. 
The price paid for apricots at the driers is one 
cent a pound. Mr. Dean showed us samples of 
fruit sulphured and unsulphured. The latter 
sells the best in Chicago on account of its beau- 
tiful brightness but the former is best flavored. 
The cost of running the drier is less than was 
expected and if prices are fair it will pay hand- 
somely this year. From there we drove to 
Tustin to see the mammoth drier recently built 
by Judson, Newell & Maxou. It is a new pa- 
tent and is warranted to dry to perfection all 
kinds of fruit. So far the gentlemen have not 
been able to get it under headway, but are get- 
ing it in shape for doing excellent work. 
Its capacity is said to be five tons of green 
fruit per day. Our visit all around was highly 
satisfactory. It demonstrated that the dry- 
ing industry is the grand saving industry of 
this valley and means fair cash prices and a 
steady market in the future for every pound of 
fruit raised in the valley. Already the cannery 
men from Los Angeles are in the valley engag- 
ing whole crops of fruit while the drkrs are 
taking all they can get. 

Plumas. 

Farminc Notes. -Cor. Sacramento Bee: In 
Red Clover Valley there is nothing but stock 
rancht s. 1 remained there last night, and the 
temperature was 22 . Ice froze to the thickness 
of two inches, and to night iu Indian Valley it 
is 93'. There is about 4,000 feet difference in 
elevation between the two places, Indian Val- 
ley being 3,500 feet above the sea level. There 
are about 40 families here, and it is the best 
farming country I have ever seeu in the moun- 
tain distru-ts. The farms average from 100 to 
1,000 acres. No grain is harvested until Au- 
gust. OenesB Valley is owned by a few men. 
It is the most beautiful place I have ever seen; 
. I cannot describe the beauty and attractiveness 
[ of the level valley surrounded by the high 
] mountains covered with dense timber growth. 
The farmhouses surpass those of the Sacramento 
' valley. The mines have not been running 
. lately, consequently the farmers are overstocked 
with grain; hay oats being 1.J cents per pound, 
and hay $(i per ton. A large quantity of last 
year's Stain is still on hand, there being noway 
of hauling it out of the valley, and no sales for 
it in that vicini.y. The farmers depend greatly 
on the mines, and when they are not running 
there is hardly any market for the sale of their 
products. There is considerable talk of start- 
ing up the mines soon; and if they do, it will not 
be long before things are again booming. Ar- 
rangements are being made for holding a fair 
at Greenville in the fall. $3,000 have been sub- 
scribed, and indications for a successful fair are 
favorable. 

Santa Cruz. 

At the Rose Fair. — Sentinel: The fruit dis- 
play in the west wing of the pavilion is credit- 
able. In the northeast corner Owen Brothers 
have a display of canned fruit in A. Loomis' 
patent jars. Cherries on branches and in boxes 
are also exhibited. 0= two loDg tables, orna- 
mented with stands of flowers, is shown some 
fine fruit. Judge Logan exhibits peaches grown 
on his place this year, and apples that were 
picked lait year in Burl's orchard, near King's 
Creek. • >o a small c ver the Judge's new seed- 
liug raspberry, the Ruby, attracts much atten- 
tion. W. P. Young shows a box of large rasp- 
berries taken from vines planted last February. 
Boxes of gooseberries are exhibited by Alex. 
Mcl'herson and C. W. Piatt. Several plates of 
large strawberries were sent iu by T. Thomp- 
son. Oranges from F. D. Seelye's place are 
quite large, and the lemons exhibited by F. A. 
Hihn are fine specimens of that fruit. G. P. 
Laird has a box of new potatoes on the table. 
The potatoes are unusually large. L. K . Bald- 
win shows a plate of tine pears, and F. R. 
Runge several boxes of raspberries. R. Conant 



JdLt 4, 1885] 



fACIFie RURAL, f RESS. 



ever, the excellent and judicious farming of 
Mr. Usher is telling a tale that turns the laugh 
on his neighbors who last year laughed at 
what they thought his eccentricity. His mag- 
nificent field is yielding 40 bushels to the acre, 
or two crops in one. Of course Mr. Usher en- 
joys the joke. He very properly thinks it his 
time to laugh at his neighbors who, generally, 
this year have poor crops. 

Tulare. 

Apples in Tulare. — Register: Until with- 
in the past two or three yearsit hasbeen almost 
a settled conviction of the citizens of our coun- 
ty that apples were a failure here, and even 
now one hears such an opinion expressed oc- 
casionally. There is no longer any excuse for 
entertaining such an opinion. The evidence 
against it would be sufficient to hang every one 
who avows such a sentiment, to a sour apple 
tree, if to avow it were a capital offence under 
the law, and we are not sure that it ought not 
to Be, for the prevalence of this notion has done 




In ' C , G M v E S S> ~ -Juty A, ' J?7& . 

JlililBwiilBi 



■ By the '■«--^/> ; ^-:^''^^^y/f^B--i'.'' >/'; ■tba' ■ 



HEN in the Conrfe of hdman Evtnt:, it bccomesj neccffary 
for one People 10 diftblve the Political Bands which have con- 



exhibits a box of black raspberries. He also has 
other berries on exhibition. C. Gault's name 
is on a card that is over a lot of berries. Mr. 
Wharton, of Soquel, has a jar of preserved 
olives next to Judge Logan's exhibit. A. 
Noble's large cherries are in a box on the table. 
A box of Centennial cherries from the Napa 
valley are exhibited. These cherries are light 
red, marbled and mottled with black. They 
are sweeter than the Napoleon, and have a 
smaller seed. But one finds always something 
new in the rloral department redolent of the 
fragrance of the flowers. A ship, whose decks 
are made of geraniums, smilax and moss, stands 
proudly on a sea of roses, cactus and petunias. 
On the same table with the ship are a number 
of magnolias. A basket made from a variety 
of pinks and fuchsias, and a border of mar- 
guerite baskets and small flowers are also on 
this table. A large horseshoe of marigolds, 
supporting a smaller horseshoe of bachelor but- 
tons, is a delicate piece of workmanship. A 
basket of roses, surmounted by a crescent of 
geraniums and a star of hydringers, 
is one of the prettiest pieces in the 
room. The pillow of geraniums, 
marguerites and "bachelor's but- 
tons," attracts much a:tention. A 
circle and star of pansies, and a 
dove made of stocks, are much ad- 
mired. Over the fernery, in ever- 
green, is this: "We come from 
bosky dells and shady glades." 

Solano. 

Fruit Shipping. — Cor. Solano 
Republican: Mr. Hixson sent to 
Chicago a car loaded with apricots, 
peaches and plums, part of which 
Mr. Pleasant and others here fur- 
nished. They have just heard from 
the fruit. In a letter to one of the 
parties who sent some of the fruit, 
Mr. Hixson says: "Fruit arrived 
in tolerable good order. Apricots 
sell for eight and nine cents per 
pound. Peaches and plums for 12 
and 15 cents. This fruit was sent 
to sell on commission by the own- 
ers of it, the same as though sent to 
San Francisco. The cost of send- 
ing is 4A cents per pound. This 
will leave a much larger profit than 
it would to have shipped to the 
city. The feeling among the fruit- 
growers in this section against |Mr. 
Porter is very bitter. He came in 
and took the best of the fruit at 
very low prices, and tried to convey 
the impression that he was working 
in the interest of the fruit-growers 
in building up a trade with the 
East; when, in fact, he has been 
trying to kill it — except what he 
could control himself. Mr. Sauls- 
bury, Mr. Porter's agent, remarked 
one day that he would rather that 
the freight had been raised to $1,000 
per car than lowered to 8400, for 
then it would help to keep out 
the small fry-meaning the small 
shippers." In his letter Mr. Hixson 
says: "We think the prices realized 
were good, considering that Porter 
sent two cars on the same day our's 
was sent with the expressed deter- 
mination to kill our car. " Apricots 
have been selling in Chicago at 12J 
cents per pound. The fruit-raisers 
on Putah creek and in Pleasant 
valley are calculating to send their 
fruit East themselves in .another 
year, so if things turn out as they 
now look like, then Mr. Porter and 
Mr. Karl will not have as good a 
thing another year as they have had 
heretofore. There is quite a large 
demand for green tomatoes to ship 
to Denver and other points. It 
takes four or five days forthem to 
make the trip." 

Stanislaus. 

Summer-Fallow. — News: Last 
year Mr. G. Usher, one of the best farmers living much to retard the planting of apple orchards, 
in the Salida neighborhood, did notsowa grain of j The trouble with our apple growers has been 
wheat. To many inquiries as to the cause, he that they have tried to grow apples in Tulare 
replied that it was not going to be a good year, as they would in New England, Ohio or Miss 
Of course, his reply to the querists was only an i ouri, and, the conditions being different, the 
evasion. When the year proved propitious, results were different of course, and therein 



this year. Other apple growers will corroborate 
this statement, we are sure. There is no 
trouble about apples doing well in Tulare if the 
right varieties are planted. 

Potato Growing. — Times: Potatoes are 
among the many products which are peculiarly 
suited to the soil and climate of Tulare county. 
It is only of late years that our agriculturists 
have learned by experience how to adapt the 
culture of potatoes to the requirements of the 
soil. The result of increased knowledge on 
this point has been a marked improvement in 
the quality of the crop, and the potatoes raised 
here are fully equal, if not superior, to any 
grown.in the State. It was formerly the cus- 
tom to plant late varieties, which did not ma- 
ture till the end of summer. The result of this 
practice was that the potatoes, by passing 
through a long period of warm weather, were 
injured by the heat. The general rule now is 
o select the very earliest varieties, and plant 
in the latter part of .Tune and beginning of 
July. The crops sown in this way are ready 



\ For eroar;civ3£ larje Hodics cT armed Trccpsiroon* lis t ,' . * ■■, {k 
t For MOMB i qg tbrm.'by amuck Trial, trust Punifimen: "(or anjr May 



FT tweted them with another, andTo affume among the Powera/jfcncjfrnch-tne>~ibou!d commit on the Inliabi;cnts of thefc orates: ,''■"." '.'■ 
:'«f the EarU., the federate and equal Station ro which the Law9 of Nature . . F° r eut 'i 5 off our Trade T.irh a!! Parts of the Wot'ii. t, ;""'"''' ^ 
;. : 4n'cTof Nature's God entitle them, a decenr Rcfpect to the. Opinions of * . v Tor impefing Taxes on us without our Coufcne : ■ ' ' eft r ,\ 
^■-Mankind requires ffl*f they fiiould declare the Caufcs which impel them ' .* 'For depriving us, in many Cafts, of the Benefits of.Tr/al £$fr:ry i',\'S c . 
,;\to the feperation. - .VV '.7 : foa-ain*f orting « beyond Seas to be cried for pretended Ounces 

J*i \Vs.lioIdthe,'e Troths to.be 'feif-cvi'denr," that all Men Sre 'created; , ./For ab&liJhlrrg tbr tree iyllem of EngliihLaivs in a Dcieh'ooerir.g Province** 
: icrjual.' that they arc endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable cfhblilbing therein an arbitrary Government, and enlarging itsBouna.irics, fb -', 
i\ Rights, that among thefc arc Liie, Liberty, and the Purfuitaof Happr-,:as to render it at once an Example and tit loflrunxot fot icttoduciog the Tims 3 
..' r.c?T?rz That to fecure tfcefc Rights, Governments are inflituted .among- lahfol-jtc Rule into ■bcfo'Colonics i- 1 -- -V' ■■''*",*. :x.-''.4ij'-r>V 
'*,'A!en/3criving their juft Povrcrs v from the Confcnt of the Governed, that,, for caV.ing' away our Charters, abolifhing onr mofrHtV'blc Laa/s^'aBci"* 
^^nencver any Form of Government becomes dcfrYuciive of tlicfc Ends.y' altering fundamentally rfce Forms of ourGovcrnmcms ly'^'.T-c. 1 ■ 
.•"it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolifh it, and to inttitutc nerr, .-' For fufpending out own Lrgiflarurcs, aid declaricglthcmfcUciiavctiea--* 
f VCovemmcnr, laying irs foundation on fucft Principles, and Organizing irs.'c-ith Power to IcgiHatc for us in all Cafes tvharfoevcr.'. '; ... .. : . ! 

Powers in loch Forra«.as to them fhJl fecm mod likely to effect, their.".;, Hctas abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of bis P-oteilioi i 
\ -Safely and Happincfs. Prudence,' indeed, will dictate that Governments".^ waging War againft us. ■' t 'r:>'^':;~\-'-\ i . y ;y -V;; 1 . ■* .... ' 
V Jmis eftablilhcd fltonld not be changed foe light and tranfiene Caules s';". , He has plundered onr Seas,' ravaged our Coafli'bm.t our Totfns/MeN 



*;- .'»-".''■ _'."' and accordingly all Experience hath ihewn, -thatMankind^are more dip- ;d c nroycd the Lives of our People. 

L --\ .<• POfed .ofuife- while Evil; are fjfferable, than to Jlfiht thcmfelvcs b/'" ' H . : ja t thisTirtt !.ar.foortinf, lar«Araics offoreirtiKcrcfr 
A. ^- ,V atDlilhing tlicFcrras to which they are accuftorned. But when a long>p] cat t t. - 
lyft'J. f .Train of Abules and Ufurpatiorat, purfuing invariably the lame Objec>,-:;(_-j rcunI; 
Vi' evinces a Defign to reduce them under abfoluta Dcfpotifm, it is, their, ^rcus Ai 
- ". , "Right, it is their Duty, to throw off fuch Government, and to prcvilcj ft c |, 



. to OOOtr- 

"plcat the Works of Dcarh, Dcfofation and Tyranny^'alrcady bt>un v.-ini ^ ..j - i 
irafiances of Cruelty and Perfidy fcarccly paralleled in ihc r,i:>l barb u : ;. f , j 
Ages, and totally unworrhy the Mead of a civiiizccT Nation. ''; '.r r " ' ''Vi'" 
He has conitraiccd out fcllov/ Citiecns' taken Captivr.cn the hi^h Seas / l£\ "Y 



.:• *l« Guards for their future Security. Suctt has i been thepaticnt Sof-- :(inr 3 „ M lhc - a Country, to become the Eacutip.-ers o* dicir Friend 
;.!, prance of thefc Csbtpta > and fuch » tw 4> NewHJty •*>»,««>?', and Brethren.'or to fall rhemfclvcs hy their Han Js. >"■• ?>u:£ ->Jf -T\\- fL 
' ■ .'< . alrains them to alter theirformcr Syttetlu ol ^Government, 1 he Hitlory . Hc hls cscitcd DomcfUc Infarrcflions amongfi us. and bes errlavo«rai i 
i* t PI* ' ^'L'S ?f Creat-Bmam is a Hirtor^f r^cated In;a ri o ar^ - . (0 br! on lhc Ionjb!lam! of our From ;, rSj , hc ac!t , ki Indian 'SaK^i! 

.? .f furptticms, all ha.mg « iu»& Objctt the .Enablilh.nent. of af?M)« ; £, „ n Bu | c of Wjr£i , • 
• ; i lain Tyranny over there States. To prove thisj iet Facts be luhmittcd tr/,- 
.V/arieli* World., ■ ■ „ ' KKr^.^-i. ,:>^ , .r ■;-,:-M';ji.vi;V</Vti > 

-:cclTa-- 



re, is an undifli-guiibcil Defirucliori,. o.f alt-e 
'in every Sragc of thefc OpprefHons we have pctiu'onci for Rcdr^fs, in 'if:? 




the friends of Mr. Usher could not refrain from 
reminding him of his own predictions of a fail- 
ure. Mr. Usher bore the railing with good na- 
ture. Whiie his neighbors were saying sharp 
things at his expense, he was not idle by any 
means. His whole farm was thoroughly sum- 
mer-plowed. Some three or four times was his 
320 acres plowed, one of the plowings being 12 
inches in depth. It was sown to a good crop 
of wheat last fall. The field looked magnificent. 
Mr. Usher kindly called on two of his neigh- 
boring friends, Mr. Jeff Hentley and Mr. Mein- 
ecke, who jointly own one of the Houser com- 
bined headers and threshers. It is well-equipped 
with a fine team, of course, Bentley and Mein- 
ecke would have no other kind. The whole is 
well and carefully managed by young Mr. Ed. 
Meinecke, one of our best country boys. From 
all accounts, things are moving on finely at the 
Usher farm this year, even if no crop was har- 
vested last year. The harvesting crew at the 
farmer's table is small. They are entertained 
in a graceful way by the young ladies of the 
household, when not in the field, by music from 
the piano. They are well fed. But then "the 
Houser," under the efficient management, is 
doing excellent work. Better than all, how- 



FAC-SIMILE OF THE DECLARATION, AS FIRST GENERALLY DISTRIBUTED IN 1776. 



for market as soon as those cultivated in the 
manner jubt described. The land is so rich 
that it is practicable by sowing early to dig 
two crops in one year, and this is frequently 
done. But the great drawback to this industry 
is the prohibitory rates of freight, which are 
placed upon the transportation of potatoes by 
the railroad company. Potatoes are selling 
here now for 50 and (iO cents per cental. The 
best qualities bring in San Krancisco 85 cents 
per cental, leaving a margin of from 25 to .'{5 
cents between the price there and here. But 
1:8 the railroad company charges GO cents per 
cental for transportation, it will readily be per- 
ceived that potatoes cannot be profitably shipped 
from here to San Francisco unless the price 
there is at least as high as $1.15 per cental. 

Yuba. 

Harvesting. — Appeal, .lune 2C: We em- 
braced a good opportunity Monday af to' noon 
for a short drive into the country in a northerly 
direction. W. H. Harkey was busily engaged 
at heading his wheat, which is a good crop. K. 
M. Thomas had his all in the stack, and the 
headers were busy on the farms of Ceo. Harter 
and J. P. Ooatott. The BergB were running a 
Shippee near the road with apparent success. 
On the opposite side of the road we saw a very 
fine field of wheat belonging to A. B. Wood 
worth, which we estimate anywhere from 30 to 
40 bushels to the acre. We next drove into the 
farm of A, H. Wilbur, where another Shippee 



lies the difficulty. It was necessary, first, to 
ascertain the varieties that were adapted to our 
soil and climate; this could be done only by 
a practical test. One cannot reason by analogy 
in such matters. In New England the Baldwin 
and White Winter Pearmain are old stand-bys, 
both of them. Here, the Pearmains do as well 
as there but the Baldwin is an utter failure. 
The Russet is a standard apple in the East but 
would not do here at all. It gets spongy when 
half grown, and is of no account whatever. The 
Peawaukie is another total failure. But the 
Ben Davis, Komanite, Limber Twig and many 
others bear heavily and keep perfectly sound 
until February and March. "Off years" for 
apple crops are distressingly numerous in all 
parts of the East, and every other year is a 
light bearing year in New England. But the 
trouble with Tulare is that our orchards bear 
too heavily every year, and half the fruit has to 
be plucked off green to save the trees from 
breaking down under their burden of fruit. 
This is especially true along the foothills, as 
the orchards of Mr. J. D. Tyler, of Porterville, 
and Alfred Miles, of Piano, abundantly prove. 
We found both of these orchards overloaded last 
year and yet they are not less heavily loaded 



was running. The wheat was very heavy and 
the machine had about all it could do to get 
through it. Our friend, C. L. Douglas was com- 
mander and L. T. Stems was at the helm. A 
large stream of wheat kept the sack -sewer quite- 
busy. These machines are a vast improvement 
over all former methods of harvesting, but they 
are necessarily quite complicated and may re- 
quire several years yet to perfect them so as to 
overcome present objections. Other portions 
of Mr. Wilbur's extensive farm were visited 
and a glimpse was also had of the farm of Win. 
Sanders, and on both was seen as line fields of 
wheat as one could wish to see, much of it will 
certainly go 40 bushels to the acre. Winter- 
sown is very light, at least such as we saw, and 
maybe estimated at anywhere from 10 to 20 
bushels to the acre. Fruit trees and vines on 
our route appeared healthy and very thrifty, 
proving the adaptability of the soil to fruit as 
well as grain. 

Early Beakim: Vines.— One year ago last 
January R. O. McMillan planted 2,000 grape- 
vine cuttings of the Muscatel and Black Ham- 
burg varieties on his ranch adjoining the old 
Park place about three miles from town. 1'he 
young vines are all bearing and will produce 
this season about one-fourth as much as aged 
vines. A sample bunch of the Muscatel brought 
in yesterday weighs one pound, the grapes be- 
ing nearly half-grown and the stem about a foot 
long. 

OREGON. 

A Syrian Queen.— ( lustaf Murhard in Port- 
land OregoTiian: I had ordered from Mr. Frank 
Benton, an American queen breeder and shipper 
of foreign varieties of bees, residing at Munich, 
in Germany, a Mount Lebanon queen, to be 
shipped to me direct, without any stoppage for 
recruiting, from his Mount Lebanon apiary, in 
Beyrout, Syria, Asia Minor. On the 6th in- 
stant I received a post.il card from Mr. Benton, 
dated "Beyrout, Syria, May 10," in which 
Mr. Benton, then at Beyrout, informed me 
that I might expect the ordered queen bee 
within a week after the arrival of the postal 
card; and sure enough, the queen arrived on the 
13th inst. by the Northern Pacific express, safe 
and in fine order. This queen bee has traveled 
by steamship and railroad from Beyrout to 
Alexandria, Egypt; thence to Trieste, in Aus- 
tria; thence crossed the European continent to 
Bremin; thence to New York, thus far by mail. 
In New York she was transferred to express to 
go via St. Paul and the N. P. R. R. to Port- 
land, making the long trip in less than 28 trav- 
eling days, deducting delays. There were 
quetn btes successfully shipped last year from 
Asia to the Eastern State?, but this queen is the 
first that reached the whole way to the Pacific 
Slope alive and in fine order. 



One Great Cauh-e ok Business Depressions. 

— Somebody has truly said that the business 
prosperity of this country always depends on 
confidence. A panic never comes until this 
confidence has been destroyed. When a man 
fears to invest his money in any undertaking 
because he does not trust the public, that fear 
will be found to be coutagious, and other men 
will follow his example and help to briDg about 
the very thing he so much dreads. There is 
probably never a reason for hard times which 
does not find its inspiration in lack of confi- 
dence. A large class of business men are al- 
ways predicting great business stagnation, and 
thfcv could not do more if they set about it 
with a puipose to bring the very lesult they 
predict. Such things will come just in accord- 
ance with their faith. If ohey fill the public 
mind with doubt, if they destroy confidence, 
then hard times will come, and they will ha7e 
no one to blame but themselves. 



Comparative Value ok Different Foods 
kor Stock. — Experiments have been made in 
England as to the comparative value of good 
hay for stock, with the result that it is esti- 
mated that 100 pounds of hay are equal to 275 
pounds of green Indian corn, 400 pounds of 
green clover, 442 pounds of rye straw, 360 
pounds of wheat straw, 160 pounds of oat 
straw, 180 pounds of barley straw, 153 pounds 
pea straw, 200 pounds of buckwheat straw, 400 
pounds of dried corn stalks, 175 pounds of raw 
potatoes, 504 pounds of turnips, 300 pounds of 
carrots, 54 pounds of rye, 4(i pounds of wheat, 
5!l pounds of oats, 45 pounds of mixed peas ami 
beans, 64 pounds of buckwheat, 57 pounds of 
Iudian corn, 08 pounds of acorns, 105 pounds of 
wheat bran, 167 pounds of wheat, pea and oat 
chaff, 179 pounds of mixed rye and barley, 5!) 
pounds of linseed, and 330 pounds of mangel- 
wurzel. 

Los ANGELES. — We have received from .1 \l 
Davies, Secretary of the Kos Angeles Hoard of 
Trade, a copy of a very interesting pamphlet 
published by the Hoard, entitled "Kos Angeles 
city and county, resources, climate, progress and 
outlook," compiled by Mr. Davies and designed 
for gratuitous distribution, with a view of mak- 
ing this important district of our State better 
known. We find the publication very interest- 
ing and well adapted to aid in the result de- 
sired. 

Grain on the Seawall. — There is a de- 
cided increase in the quantity of grain under 
the seawall sheds. About 20,000 tons are in 
department 2, and a small part of it is of thia 
year's growth, 



6 



pACIFie rural* press 



[July 4, 1885 




The Choice. 

IWritten for ROEU Pkkss bj H.m'r Uaywooi>.| 



The spirit flies from spray to spray, 

Prom land to sea, from earth to star, 

And spans the living, loving heart and hand 

Of Nature, to find true happiness; 

For what doth Nature strive ? 

Kor power ! in peace and war 

Her elements unceasing strive, 

And man doth strive— for power ! 

Why should we strive 

Beyond the limits of life's noblest end? 

Kor wealth or fame, if happiness 

He power? and it mud be; 

Kor this the world doth strive it says, 

Korever. here and after; 

By all means and in all ways, 

Thro' time, eternity. 

The secret source of power 
Is difficulty overcome 
By strong determination ; 
By this all things are won 
That can be won. 
And happiness may be our own 
If we are but determined. 
Yea, duty done is heaven won. 

part n. 

What shall one day be worth to me 

Krom out the years to come ? 

What shall each day be worth, my soul, 

To life, to love and home? 

Shall it be happiness, true power 

Kor every creature's daily dower ? 

Yea, what should power be 
But gladness, happiness ? 
Are yonder stern and lofty mountains 
As hr.ppy as the humble earth 
That lives and loves with sun 
And summer's tender flowers — 
With uses sweet and calm content 
Kor man's and Nature's sake? 

The mountains, genius, aye shall be 

A help and barriers from life's sea 

Of storms and windy gusts, but cannot be 

The firm foundation of our homes ! 

Keep near to home, keep near to heaven, 

Kor home is heaven, and heaven is happiness ! 

What tho' the way is hard, 

The morning sun like love is here; 

Kaithful and soon he comes to help, 

And fjves himself for sympathy; 

And if he is not here, then he will come — 

The sun of truth and righteousness; 

And we may measure as we like, 

Our life, our love, our home and heaven, 

If we but choose to win 

The dawn of day and Eden ! 

Then grasp the gift; it is thine own, 
If strength and hope and love doth come; 
Duty and home are one, 
Duty is happiness. 

Yet love must sing. 

The mountains shine 

With glory bright and holy, 

And lend their rays to lowly ways 

And listen to life's story ? 

San Dicro. 



Anecdotes of Washington. 

Mr. 1'unch, who does a great deal of pleasant 
writing for the young people in the columns of 
the New Orleans Timiii-lh-morral, chatted as 
follows about George Washington last week: 

When the news of the battle of Yorktown, 
and the surrender of Cornwallis, which ended 
the Revolutionary War in the defeat of the 
British army, reached England, J/)rd North, the 
l'rime Minister, received it as he would a bul- j 
let in the heart. lie threw up his arms, strode 
backward and forward across his room, ex- 
claiming, "It is all over! It is all over! all ! 
over!" Yet, 20 years later, when the news of 
Washington's death reached that country, the 
British fleet lowered their flags at half-mast in 
his honor, and Napoleon Bonaparte, first con I 
sul of France, ordered that black crape should 
be hung from all the flags throughout the public j 
service for 10 days. 

I think it is because our hero was so pure 
and true, that he stands as a bright example 
for all time. Most great men have had some 
darker side and have tarnished their fame with 
deeds that we must regret and try to forget. 
But whether we look at Washington as a pri- 
vate citizen, as a soldier, or a statesman, we 
find nothing that lessens our respect for him. 
As Thackeray says of Abd el-Kader, I say of 
Washington: 

"I^ess quick to slay in battle, than in peace to spare 
and save, 

Of brave men wisest councilor, of councilors most 
brave; 

The eye that flashed destruction could beam gentle- 
ness and love, 
The lion in thee mated lamb, the eagle mated dove." 

I expect many of you are studying United 
States history or reading some life of Washing- 



ton, and that I shall run the risk of telling you 
something you know already if I repeat any of 
the stories that are told of him. Yet I have 
lately heard two that may be new to you. 

A man by the name of Kllrick lived near 
Washington's headquarters at Newburg. He 
professed to be very patriotic, but was a 
traitor, and determined to capture Washing- 
ton and give him up to the British. This bad 
man had a daughter, who overheard her father 
plotting with the enemy to invite the Amer- 
ican general to his house to dinner, and to have 
a party of British soldiers take him and carry 
him to the Hudson river, where in ten min- 
utes he would be under the guns of the enemy. 
.She went directly to Washington, told him of 
the plot, and begged him not to come. He 
could not believe Kllrick to be so wicked, and 
accepted the invitation, but ordered a company 
of his Life Guard to dress themselves in English 
uniform and ride up to the house soon after din- 
ner. When Kllrick saw what he supposed was 
a company of British soldiers he rose, laid his 
hand on Washington's shoulder and said: 
"General, I believe you are my prisoner." "I 
believe not, sir; but you are mine," was the 
answer, as the Life Guard filed into the room. 

The girl, who had been so good and true a 
patriot, was wild with grief. She had supposed 
that Washington would remain away, and not 
that her father would be in danger, and for her 
sake Washington let the traitor go on condi- 
tion that he left the country. 

The other is also about his treatment of a 
Tory, as the traitors are called in those days. 
This time it was a woman. She was poor and 
dependent upon her garden for a support, and 
this had been robbed and destroyed by three of 
the American soldiers. In riding through the 
country in citizen's dress he stopped at this 
woman's house, and without having any idea 
who he was she told him of her loss. He gave 
her money enough from his pocket to buy what 
she needed and immediately rode to Major Gen. 
I'utnam, who commanded the center division 
of the army, ordereda search for the men who 
had committed the theft, and that, when found, 
they be sent to his headquarters. The third 
day thereafter an aide -de camp conducted three 
soldiers into his presence. 

"Are you the ones who disgraced the uniform 
you wear by plundering a defenseless woman's 
garden?" asked Washington, sternly. 

"She is a Tory," was the reply. 

"So she told me, and also that her sons are 
in the British army. But she is a woman, 
nevertheless, and for that reason, if for no 
other, entitled to respect. Your conduct was 
worthy of oppressors rather than those who — 
as does the American army — aim to prevent 
oppression. Accompany them to the woman," 
addressing the officer having them in charge, 
"and see that they fully compensate her for the 
damage they wrought. Another offense of a 
like nature will not be dealt with so leniently.' 

Within the month two soldiers — this wo- 
man's sons — deserted the British standard and 
enrolled themselves with those who fought be- 
neath the flag which was emblematic of freedom, 
justice, equality. 

BlRTHS and Deaths in thk White House. 
— One of Thomas .lefferson's grandchildren was 
born in the White House, one of Tyler's and 
three of Andrew Jackson's. They were the 
children of Andrew Jackson Donaldson, the 
nephew and adopted son of Jackson. General 
Grant's granddaughter, Colonel Fred < Grant's 
daughter, was born in the White House. Gen- 
eral W. H. Harrison, General Zachary Taylor 
and Abraham Lincoln were buried from there. 
Garfield was buried from the rotunda of the 
Capitol. One of President Lincoln's children 
died in the White House. So did Mrs" Grant's 
father, Colonel Fred Dent. There have been 
more marriages than deaths in the White House. 
The first marriage was that of Miss Todd, a 
niece of Mrs. Madison, in 1810, the groom be- 
ing a Yirginia Congressman, John G. Jackson. 
The next marriage had for its contracting par- 
ties the daughter of President Monroe and Mr. 
Gouverneur, of New York. John Adams, the 
son of John Quiney Adams, married his cousin, 
Miss Kelley, in the White House in 1820. The 
feast, it is said, lasted an entire week. Next 
came the wedding of Mr. I'anquet and Miss 
Lewis, which was soon followed by the marriage 
of Miss Tyler and Mr. Waller, bothof Yirginia. 
The last wedding in the White House was that 
of Miss Nellie Grant and Mr. Algernon Sartoris. 
President Tyler proposed to h\s Becoud wife, 
Miss Gardiner, in the White House. The re- 
cords show but three christenings in the White 
House — Mrs, Wilcox, about eighty years ago; 
that of Julia, the daughter of Colonel Fred 
• Jrant, and the youngest daughter of President 
Hayes. In Grant's terms there was a wedding, 
a birth, a christening and a death in the White 
House.— X. T. If < raid. 



Women in Iowa.— That the women of Iowa 
are rapidly coming to the front is evidenced in 
the report of Mrs. Scott, one of the Iowa super- 
intendents at the New Orleans Exposition. 
There are in this State: Number of farms owned 
and directed by women, !(.">5: number managed 
by women, 18; stock farms owned and direct- 
ed by women, 6; dairy farms, 20; green houses, 
5; market gardens, !); number of women serving 
at present as county superintendents, IS; num- 
ber managing instisutions of learning, 37; num- 
ber of women physicians, 125; attorneys at 
law, f>; ministers, 10; dentists, .3; professional 
nurses, 110; civil engineer, 1. 



A Novel and Interesting Gift. 

IWritten tor Btnuti Pkkss by Maip-ofall-Work.) 

Rummaging in the garret one day, trying to 
restore order out of chaos, I found several 
years' copies of the BUBAL Pkkss that had been 
stored away up there to make room for the ac- 
cumulations of new papers in the closets and 
on the tables downstairs. There they were, 
slumbering away in the dark and doing no one 
any good. I was struck by the grea"; number 
of excellent pictures, many of them full page 
scenes from nature, that were hiding their 
graces up there in the dust and darkness. I 
thought I would get them all out anyway and 
and give them a farewell look before shutting 
them up again or taking them to the kitchen. 
But the more I examined them, the more un- 
willing I felt to see them destroyed. Ponder- 
ing them over, I very soon conceived the de- 
sign of a Ri RAi. Pkkss picture scrap-book. Tfie 
idea grew and took action, possessed itself of 
an old ledger — large and in good condition — 
and the old tiles very soon began to yield up 
their treasures. I found it impossible to con- 
fine myself to pictures, for there were many 
stories, poems and editorials too valuable to be 
lost. They were pieced in to fill up the pages 
and as the work progressed the more interest- 
ing and satisfactory it becane. It is not yet 
finished, but it is universally noticed and liked 
so far as it goes. The book, outside of its com- 
panionable presence in the house, already has a 
mission, and is being prepared for its work as 
fast as possible. It is to bo given to a young 
married couple (having first found a bride who 
will promise to take care of it and appreciate 
it). It will be read or looked over by everyone 
that comes near it, for the reason that no one 
begrudges the time to look over a book with a 
picture ou every page. I have tried the ex- 
periment on unsuspecting callers, and found it 
a success every time. 

In a new home, where not many books and 
papers have been gathered together, it will do 
a good work, not only by its pure and homelike 
teachings, but by its unlimited capacity to ad- 
vertise the paper from which all these good 
things were taken. If anything be pure, if 
anything be lovely and above reproach, put it 
where it can be seen, heard and felt. 

The Fourth of July. 

The following is an extract from an oration 
by Daniel Webster, delivered July 4, 1SO0, 
while Mr. Webster was a member of the junior 
class of Dartmouth college: 

The 4th day of July, 177<i, is now arrived; and 
America, manfully springing from the tortur- 
ing fangs of the British Lion, now rises majes- 
tic in the pride of her sovereignty, and bids her 
Kigle elevate his wings ! The solemn declara- 
tion of Independence is now pronounced, amidst 
crowds of admiring citizens, by the supreme 
council of our nation ; and received with the 
unbounded plaudits of a grateful people ! ! 

That was the hour, when heroism was proved, 
when the souls of men were tried. It was then, 
ye venerable patriots, it was then you stretched 
the indignant arm, and united swore to be free! 
Despising such toys as subjugated empires, you 
then knew no middle fortune between liberty 
and death. Firmly relying on the patronage of 
heaven, unwarned in the resolution you had 
taken, you, then undaunted, met, engaged, de- 
feated the gigantic power of Britain, and rose 
triumphant over the ruins of your enemies ! 
Trenton, Princeton, Bennington and Saratoga 
were the successive theaters of your victories, 
and the utmost bounds of creation are the lim- 
its of your fame ! The sacred fire of freedom, 
then enkindled in your breasts, shall be per- 
petuated through the long descent of future 
ages, and burn, with undiminished fervor, in 
the bosoms of millions yet unborn. 

Finally, to close the sanguinary conflict, to 
grant Amei-ica the blessings of an honorable 
peace, and cloth her heroes with laurels, Corn 
wallis, at whose feet the kings, and princes of 
Asia have since thrown their diadems, was com- 
pelled to submit to the sword of our father 
Washington. The great drama is now com- 
pleted — our independence is now acknowledged; 
and the hopes of our enemies are blasted for- 
ever! Columbia is now seated in the forum of 
nations, and the empires of the world are lost 
in the bright effulgence of her glory! 

Thrs, friends and citizens, did the kind hand 
of over-ruling Providence conduct us, through 
toils, fatigues and dangers, to independence and 
peace. If piety be the rational exercise of the 
human soul, if religion be not a chimera, and if 
the vestiges of heavenly assistance are clearly 
traced in those events, which mark the annals 
of our nation, it becomes us, on this day, in 
consideration of the great things, which the 
Lord has done for us, to render the tribute of 
unfeigned thanks to that God, who superintends 
the universe, and holds aloft the scale that 
weighs the destinies of nations. 

The conclusion of the revolutionary war did 
not conclude the great achievements of our 
countrymen. Their military character was 
then, indeed, sufficiently established, but the 
time was coming which should prove their 
political sagacity. 

No sooner was peace restored with England, 
the first grand article of which was the acknowl- 
edgment of our Independence, than the old sys- 
tem of confederation, dictated at first by neces- 
sity and adopted for the purposes of the mo- 
ment, was found inadequate to the government 



of an extensive empire. Under a full convic- 
tion of this, we then saw the people 
of these States engaged in a transaction, 
which is, undoubtedly, the greatest ap- 
proximation towards human perfection the 
political world ever yet experienced; and 
which, perhaps, will forever stand on this his- 
tory of mankind, without a parallel. A great 
republic, con: posed of different States, whose 
interests in all respects could not be perfectly 
compatible, then came deliberately forward, 
discarded one system of government and adopted 
another, without the loss of one man's blood. 

Pleasing, indeed, were it hereto dilate on the 
future grandeur of America; but we forebear, 
and pause for a moment, to drop the tear of af- 
fection over the graves of our departed war- 
riors. Their names should be mentioned on 
every anniversary of Independence, that the 
youth of each successive generation may learn 
not to value life, when held in competition with 
their country's safety. 

Wooster, Montgomery and Mercer fell 
bravely in battle, and their ashes are now en- 
tombed on the fields that witnessed their valor. 
Let their exertions in our country's cause be re- 
membered, while Liberty has an advocate, or 
gratitude has place in the human heart. 

Greene, the immortal hero of the Carolinas, 
has since gone down to the grave, loaded with 
honors, and high in the estimation of his coun- 
trymen. The courageous Putnam has long 
slept with his fathers; and Sullivan and C'iley, 
New Hampshire's veteran sons, are no more 
numbered wi h the living. 

How a Dinner was Gained and Lost. 

A butcher's boy carried a basket containing 
a big roast of beef, eight pounds of beefsteak 
and six chickens for the Sunday dinner into a 
boarding house in Klevcnth street last week. 
He had hardly mounted his cart and driven 
away down the street when a smooth-faced 
young man rang the basement bell. 

"There is some dispute at the shop over the 
weight of the meat sent here by the butcher," 
he explained to the landlady, "and I have been 
sent here to take it back to the shop and 
re weigh it." 

The landlady thought it was a shame that 
the butcher couldn't weigh her meats correctly 
the i.r.-i time. 

"If your stupid clerks can't do their work 
properly they ought to be discharged," she 
snapped out. 

' Would you be kind enough to loan me a tin 
pan in which to carry the meat back to the 
shop?" inquired the young man with an 
oleomargarine smile. 

The landlady took a new, bright tin pan and 
dumped the roast, the steak and the chickens 
into it. 

"There," she exclaimed, as she gave it to the 
young man. "You hurry right back with the 
meat, for I want to cook the roast for dinner." 

Tne smooth-faced youth took the pan with a 
"certainly, madam," and went out to the 
street. 

Two hours passed and the young man had 
not returned. , The dinner hour approached, 
and the cook was becoming furious. At last 
the landlady went post-haste to the butcher shop 
with fire in her eye. 

"Where's that young man you sent to my 
house to get the meat I ordered to have it re- 
weighed !"she shouted. 

"I haven't sent anybody to bring back the 
meat," replied the butcher. 

"Well,! never," said the woman, her face 
red with anger. "Do you mean to say I have 
been swindled?" 

"I should judge that you had," mused the 
butcher, as he proceeded to sell the landlady 
another dinner. — Eaxtern Paper. 

Lincoln as an Ofkice-Seekkr. — Meeting 
Mr. A. S. H. White, mentioned by Major 
Poore in his reminiscences, two weeks ago, he 
spoke of a fact concerning ex-President Lincoln 
that is not generally known. Mr. White, in 
184!), was Appointment Clerk in the Interior 
Department. (General Tom Ewing was Secre- 
tary of the Interior. Abraham Lincoln and 
Justice Butterfield were rival applicants for the 
position of Commissioner of the General Land 
Office. The fight for the place grew very hot, 
antl was continued for several weeks, if not 
more. Lincoln managed his fight personally 
and was a frequent visitor to Mr. White's of- 
fice. He filed a large pile of petitions and 
recommendations. The fight grew so warm 
that the clerks took sides. Lincoln would have 
won the fight, but for the fact that one of the 
clerks in the Appointment Office, Richard H. 
Caffey by name, abstracted some of his strong- 
est papers from the pile, and Butterfield won. 
Lincoln raised a big fuss over the loss of his 
papers, and Secretary Ewing discharged Caffey . 
Had Lincoln succeeded and filled the position 
of Commissioner of the Land Office for four 
years it is pretty safe to say that he would 
never have been President. 



"And bo you received a divorce from that 
vagabond husband of yours, Mrs: Smith?" 
"Yes, I am glad to say that I have." "Didn't 
you feel quite overpowered when you heard the 
decision of the judge?" "Not exactly. I felt 
sort of unmanned, so to speak." 

One-legged orators are always successful on 
the stump. 



July 4, 1885] 



fACIFie RURAL* fRESS. 



7 



Chaff. 

A swell gathering— A boil. 
A near relation — A whisper. 
The hire class — All sorts of laborers. 
A forger should always write a running hand. 
A wooden wedding — Marrying a block-head. 
Paper with the largest circulation — Bank- 
notes. 

The circus season is upon us, the saw-dust of 
the year. 

Although the porcupine is fretful, he's posi- 
tive on all points. 

When are watches easily stolen? — When they 
are off their guard. 

"Don't you love the little birdies?" entreats 
the poetess. Yes, indeed we do, but we want 
the toast well browned. 

A Spartanburg woman is so cleanly that she 
uses two rolling pins— one for the pastry and 
the other for her husband's head. 

There is said to be a married couple living 
in Norwich, Conn., who are both mute. They 
converse entirely with broom and bootjack. 

Boston people never purchase ink. They 
simply request the stationer to supply them 
with "a modicum of the dark possibility of 
right ideas." 

"How can I find out about the young lady 
towhom I am engaged?" asks a prospective 
Benedict. Has she a younger brothel? If so, 
consult him. 

Two Troy men have invented a machine that 
will make 1,500,000 matches in an hour. The 
thing should be in great demand at the fashion- 
able watering-places this summer. 

The summer has come. Do not keep little 
children penned up indoors, fearing fresh air 
will give them colds or the sunshine spoil their 
complexions. Turn the rascals out. 



Protecting the Washington Monument. — 
A dispatch from Philadelphia says: The cop- 
per rods ordered by Colonel Casey in this city, 
to guard the Washington Monument against 
further strokes of lightning, are now ready for 
duty. The rods, which are four in number, 
are three-quarters of an inch in thickness, and 
are to extend to the outside of the roof of the 
monument, one for each face of the roof, and to 
be in direct connection with the four copper 
rods which extend from the iron pillars which 
compose the frame work of the elevator to the 
base of the capstone. The four additional rods 
will each terminate in seven branching gilded 
needle points. It has been determined by ex- 
perience that the interior lightning rod ap- 
paratus is capable of conducting all the electri- 
city that could possibly come from any storm, 
and, with the additional outside facilities, it is 
thought that all danger from lightning will be 
averted. There will be, with the aluminum 
tips, twenty nine lightning rods on the roof of 
the monument for the lightning to strike, and 
be conducted thence without damage into the 
ground. It is almost impossible for a bolt to 
strike at such an angle as to escape the roof 
with its many attractions. 



Mr. Beeciier's Torn Trousers. — Toward 
the close of last evening's prayer meeting at 
Plymouth Church, Mr. Beecher, shaking his 
finger gravely at those who sat on his left, said 
to those who sat on his right: "The edification 
hasn't been evenly divided this evening. My 
friends on my left have been industriously en- 
gaged in laughing at me because I have a big 
hole in the left leg of my pantaloons. [Laugh- 
ter.] Allow me to inform them that these are 
a new pair. If they were old and I couldn't 
afford new ones I should be dreadfully ashamed. 
As it is i am not, but my wife is. [Renewed 
laughter.] In making a call this afternoon my 
leg came in contact with a barrel, and it had a 
nail in it; hence the tear. I tried to close it 
with a pin, but the pin dropped out. So it is 
with our sins. We can't pin them up. The 
pin will drop out and disclose the bare spot. 
— 2V. Y. Tim<s. 



Lincoln's First United States Court Case. 
— Of his first case in the United States Court 
the following story is told: He had secured a 
client, whose case was found to be bad, and 
when he got up to address the Court, Mr. Lin- 
coln spoke as follows: "This is the first case I 
have had in this court, and therefore I have ex- 
amined it with great care. The only question 
at issue is one of authority. I have found in- 
numerable precedents sustaining the opposite 
side, but have not found one in my favor. With 
these remarks I submit the case." [Laughter.] 
That a lawyer should have found himself on 
the wrong side is not strange, but that he 
should say so was strange indeed. He was per- 
haps the only lawyer of whom this epitaph 
could have been truthfully written: "Here lies 
Abraham Lincoln. He told the truth when it 
ruined his case." —Carl Schurz. 



Science has come to the aid of baseball play- 
ers, and announces, for the benefit of batsmen 
who are ambitious to make heavy hits, that the 
ball should be struck at the angle of 23 degrees 
in order to send it to the greatest possible dis- 
tance. Repeated experiments in artillery have 
proven that a ball fired from a cannon at this 
angle will carry farther than if fired at any 
ther angle with a like charge of powder. 



"YOUJYG BoLKS' QoLUJvlN. 

The Puzzle Box. 

A Military Puzzle. 

Ye puzzlers all, I pray you show 
How you nine men would so bestow, 
Ten rows to form — in each row three, 
My soldier lads, how can this be ? 

Riddle. 

I piled oyer a cord of wood and got it, but didn't 
want it. I picked it up but couldn't find it. I took 
it into the house, and found it. What was it ? 

Mythological Acrostic. 

The initials name the highest and most powerful 
deity of the early Romans. 

1. The Roman divinity who was supposed to 
watch over the fortunes of the female sex. 

2. The muse of astronomy. 

3. A mythological poet, much earlier than Homer. 

4. A messenger of the gods, who appears to have 
been originally the personification of the rainbow. 

5. The muse who presided over choral song and 
dancing. 

6. One of the three Graces. 

7. A daughter of Neptune and Venus, for whom 
a certain island was named. Uncle Ben. 

Blanks. 

[Fill the second blank with the first word be- 
headed.] 

1. "You are a ," says Pat. "Be "says 

Biddy. 

2. "What a queer pine ! I never saw 

like it before 1" Robin. 

Numerical. 

Treading carefully lest I should 1, 2, 3 some of 
the beautilul things about me, 4 walked through my 
friend's garden— which he prizes more than 5, 6, 7, 
8— and at length reached his 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. 8 
bed, which has received more careful attention than 
any of the other plants. Uncle Ben. 

Answers to Last Puzzles. 

Cross-Word Puzzle.— Glove. Planting a gar- 
den.— 1. Goose-berry. 2. Sage. 3. Flox (flocks). 
4. Crab-apple. 5. Witch-hazel. 

Riddle. — A dollar. 

Hidden Philosophers and Metaphysicians. 
—1. Socrates, Plato. 2. Locke. 3. Hamilton. 4. 
Thales. 

Washington's First Correspondence. 

Here are two letters that were written by 
two boys who became great and good men. 
Now, while we are about to commemorate the 
anniversary of our nation's birth, it is pleasant 
to look back to the days when those two great 
patriots were only boys like the rest of us. 

The first letter is from Richard Henry Lee, 
who spoke so boldly and acted so bravely for 
our country in the time of her great peril and 
need : 

Pa brought me two pretty books full of pic- 
tures he got them in Alexandria they have pic- 
tures of dogs and cats and tigers and elefants 
and ever so many pretty things cousin bids me 
send you one of them it has a picture of an 
elffant and a little idian boy on his back like 
uncle* jo's sam pa says if I learn my tasks good - 
he will let uncle jo bring me to see you will you 
ask your ma to let you come to see me. 

Richard Henry Lee. 

To this letter Washington sent the following 
reply : 

Dear Dickey I thank you very much for the 
pretty picture book you gave me. Sam asked 
me to show him the pictures, and I showed him 
all the pictures in it ; and I read to him how 
the tame elephant took care of the master's lit- 
tle boy, and put him on his back and would not 
let anybody touch his master's little son. I 
caa read three or four pages sometimes without 
missing a word. Ma says I may go to see you 
and stay all day with you next week if it be 
not rainy. She says I may ride my pony Hero 
if Uncle Ben will go with me and lead Hero. 
I have a little piece of poetry about the picture 
book you gave me, but I musn't tell you who 
wrote the poetry. 

" G. W's. compliments to R. H. L. 

And likes his book full well, 

And henceforth will count him his friend, 

And hopes many happy days he may end." 

Your good friend, 
George Washington. 

I am going to get a whip-top soon, and you 
may see it and whip it. 

In less than half a century after writing this 
child letter, this same George Washington 
stood before a vast assemblage of people, and, 
with his hand upon the Bible, took the oath as 
the first President of the United States. 

" Long live George Washington, President of 
the United States," shouted one who stood 
near, and the people caught and repoated the 
shout. But the first person to clasp Washing- 
ton's hand was his life-long friend, Richard 
Henry Lee. 



Employer to clerk: "I don't object to your 
going to a funeral once in awhile; but I think 
you might bring me home a fish or two." Sun 
blush on the clerk's nose extends rapidly to his 
ears. 



(£>OOD J^EALTH. 

Resisting Electric Shocks. 

Dr. A. L. Hummel recounts some curious 
cases of recovery from shocks which ought, ac- 
cording to all ideas upon the subject, to have 
proved fatal. One is that of an employe of the 
Brush Company, who, while still grasping the 
wire in his left hand, cut it with a pair of nip- 
pers held in the right. The current was at 
once established through his body and he was 
held to the wire at the top of a 30-foot pole for 
three minutes at least, by which time a ladder 
had been procured and he was released by a 
fellow-workman. During this time a current 
of 3,000 volts, or sufficient to run 50 arc lamps 
of 2,000 candle power each, had apparently 
passed through his body, yet he was able to 
reach the pavement with slight assistance, suf- 
fered little or no constitutional disturbance, 
save a slight rise in temperature, and was not 
confined to his bed. His punishment was lim- 
ited to the charring of three fingers on the left 
hand, and a small but deeply-burnt hole in the 
palm of the right hand. The only treatment 
was that applied for simple burns. Another 
case was afforded by one of the workmen of the 
Bell Telephone Company, who having climbed 
a pole belonging to the Brush Uompany, in or- 
der to carry a wire over it, grasped the tie 
wire of the positive line with one hand, and 
that of the negative line with the other. Here 
he was held until an assistant ran five squares 
to the electric light station, when the circuit 
was broken and he was released. A rope had 
had been attached to him and passed over the 
arm of the pole. This was held by another 
man and he was thus prevented from falling. 
Though unconscious for a while, he soon rallied, 
but his pulse never exceeded 86, nor his tem- 
perature 101°. The thumb of the left hand was 
burnt nearly off, as were also the index and 
middle fingers of the right hand. These were 
all amputated. 



The Approach of Age. 

The approach of age si ows itself about the 
eyes. Lines come, faintly at first, then deeper, 
until the incipient crows' feet are indicated, 
developed and revealed. The woman who, 
looking in her glass, sees these fatal lines, 
diverging from the outer corner of her eyes, 
knows that she has reached an era in her life. 
She recognises it with a sigh if she be a vain, 
a lovely or a worldly woman ; with a smile, 
perhaps, if she has children in whom she can 
live her own youth over again. But it can 
never be a gay smile ; none of us, men or 
women, like to feel youth — that precious pos- 
session — slipping away from us. But we should 
never be seen on the lookout for crows' feet or 
gray hairs. Looking for them is sure to bring 
them, for thinking about them brings them. 
Tears form a part of the language of the eye, 
which is eloquent enough when sparingly used, 
and which should be sparingly used for other 
reasons than that of adding to their mute elo- 
quence. Tears are a disfiguring expression of 
emotion, and those who get in the habit of 
weeping over every small vexation do much to 
acquire a careworn, miserable expression, and 
are sure to look old before their time. Exces- 
sive weeping has been known uot only to in- 
jure but actually to destroy the sight. Few 
women look pretty or even interesting in tears, 
though it has long been a pleasant fiction in 
poetry and romance to suppose that they do. 
Many women, some men, most children, make 
most disfiguring and distorting grimaces while 
crying ; and the lady who thinks she can work 
upon a man's feelings by a liberal display of 
tears, should carefully study a becoming mode 
of producing them before her looking-glass. 
Grimaces soften no heart, and tears, accom- 
panied by the usual distortion, have a harden- 
ing effect if not a visible one. 

In a prettily written work, now probably out 
of print, purporting to be the story of the life 
of one of Milton's wives, the author makes the 
poet say of his wife's eyes, after crying, that 
they resembled " the sun's clear shining after 
the rain," a very pretty natural object indeed, 
but during the rain itself the observer is not 
inclined to be complimentary. — Whitehall Rev. 



Curing Rheumatism With Celery. — A 
German correspondent of an English paper 
writes as follows: I have had a severe attack of 
inflajnmatory rheumatism and was healed in 
two days' time by a soup made of the stalks 
and roots of celery: therefore I desire to make 
this simple remedy known through the columns 
of your paper for the benefit of all suffering 
from gout or rheumatism of any form. I was 
induced to try it by seeing the following notice: 
Numerous cures of rheumatism by the use of 
celery have recently been announced in Knglish 
papers. New discoveries — or what claim to be 
discoveries — of the healing virtues of plants are 
continually being made. One of the latest is 
that celery is a cure for rheumatism; indeed, it 
is asserted the disease is impossible if the vege- 
table is cooked and freely eaten. The fact that 
it is always put on the table raw prevents its 
therapeutic powers from being known. The 
celery should be cut into bits, boiled in water 



until soft, and the water drank by the patii 
Serve warm with pieces of toasted bread, and the 
painful ailment will soon yield. Such is the 
declaration of a physician who has again aud 
again tried the experiment, and with uniform 
success. At least two-thirds of the cases 
named "heart disease" are ascribed to rheuma- 
tism and its agonizing ally, gout. Small pox, 
so much dreaded, is not halt so destructive as 
rheumatism, which, it is maintained by many 
physicians, can bo prevented by obeying na- 
ture's laws in diet. Here, in Germany, we boil 
the root and stalks, as the root is the principal 
part of it, and afterward eat it as a salad with 
oil and vinegar. I received such immediate ben- 
efit that I am anxious to let all the rheumatic 
sufferers know of it. 



X)ojviESTie QeojNjojviY. 



Cinnamon Buns. — After supper, at night, set 
to warm one pint of milk, a cup of butter and 
lard mixed, a cup of white sugar, and a little 
of two quarts of Hour, When warmed beat till 
it is cold, add a cup of yeast and the rest of the 
flour and set away to rise. After breakfast 
work in another cup of sugar, roll out the dough 
about half an inch thick; cover it with the mix- 
ture given below and roll it up like a roly-poly 
pudding. Set it to rise again and then cut it in 
slices one and one-half inches thick, and bake in 
a moderate oven. This is for lunch or tea cake. 
Layer for same — half a pound of butter, one 
pound of light brown sugar and two tablespoon- 
fuls of ground cinnamon; work this till it is all 
in a cream and spread over as directed above. 



Banana Cream. — Take one pint of milk, one 
cup sugar, two ta'olespoonfuls flour, one salt- 
spoonful salt, two eggs, one pint to one quart 
of cream, and six bananas sifted or cut in very 
thin slices. Boil the milk. Mix the sugar, 
flour and salt; add the whole eggs, and beat 
them all together. Add the boiling milk, and 
when well mixed turn into the double boiler 
and cook twenty minutes, stirring constantly 
till smooth; after that occasionally. When cool 
add the cream, bananas and sugar to make it 
quite sweet. This makes a smooth and delicious 
cream; and if the milk is boiling and the cus- 
tard cooked twenty minutes there will be no 
taste of the flour. 



A cake that is quickly made and pronounced 
by many as palatable as more elaborately pre- 
pared ones is made as follows: Break two eggs 
in a cake dish, add two cups granulated sugar 
and one cup of butter. Beat all to a cream. 
Then add one and a half cups of buttermilk, 
and flour enough for a thin batter. Flavor. 
This will make two cakes in common sized tins. 
To vary it two cups of raisins may be added. 



Sally Lunn. — One tablespoonful butter, one 
egg, one tablespoonful sugar. Rub these well 
together with a spoon, add one and a half tea- 
cupfuls milk and a little salt, flour to make a 
stiff batter, one teaspoonful baking powder 
thoroughly stirred into each cup of flour. Put 
into a greased tin and bake eight minutes in a 
quick oven. Send to the table whole. It must 
be broken, as cutting makes it heavy. 



Crumpets. — Early in the morning take a 
quart of very light dough; make it into a thick 
batter with warm water, three well-beaten eggs, 
and a cup of sugar, if you like sweet cakes for 
breakfast, if not, fruit it. Mix smoothly and 
set away to rise till breakfast. Then drop a 
large tablespoonful of the batter on a hot grid- 
dle. Have them round in shape but do not 
turn them. 



Eggs and Cheese. — This way of preparing 
eggs makes an appetizing luncheon dish. Boil 
the eggs hard and cut them in halves. Take 
out the yolks, and mix them with finely-grated 
cheese (Parmesan if you have it), fried bread 
crumbs, pepper and salt to taste. Refill the 
whites with the mixture, and serve the eggs on 
a bed of watercress. 



Beaten Tea Cakes. — Make a paste of one 
quart of flour, salt, one beaten egg; a cup of 
butter, and enough new milk to roll it handily 
on the pas'eboard, then pound the mass for half 
an hour with a pestle, roll the dough out thin, 
cut into round cakes and serve hot. These arc 
delicious tea cakes. 



Stale Cake. — A nice way to use stale cake 
is to make a thin custard and pour over the 
pieces while hot. If you wish it to look very 
nice, beat the whites of the eggs to a froth and 
cook them in milk. Spread over the top of the 
cake and custard, and ornament it with colored 
sugar sand or drops of jelly. 



A Plain Custard. — Beat two eggs with two 
spoonfuls of sugar. Add one pint of milk. 
Flavor. Place in a deep dish in a kettle con- 
taining a pint or two of boiling water and let it 
boil till the custard begins to thicken. If it 
boils too long it will be too watery. 

Angels' Food. — Two cups sugar, whites of 
eleven eggs beaten to a stiff froth, one tea- 
spoonful of cream of tartar and flour enough to 
make a thin batter. 



Fio Cake. — Make an ordinary layer cake. 
Stew the figs until tender, then lay them be- 
tween the thin cakes. 



7. 



fACIFie f^URAlo f> RESS 



[Joly 4, 1885 




A. T. DEWEY. W. B. EWER. 

Published by DEWEY & CO. 



Office, S51 Market St., N. E. cor. Front St., S. F. 
£T Take the Elevator, No. It Front St. la 



Our Subscription Rates. 

Our Scbsckiption Kates are three pollars a year' 
d advance . If continued subscriptions are not prepaid io 
advance, for any reason, fifty cents extra will be charged 
for each year or fraction of a year. CaT No new names 
plaoed on the list without cash in advance. Agents wanted. 



Advertising Rates. 

/ Week. 1 Month. 3 Montht. 1 Year. 
Per Line (agate).... I .25 $.80 * 2.20 $ 5.00 
Half inch Otqaa re). 1.50 4.00 10.00 24.00 

One lnoh 2.00 6.00 1 4.00 45.00 

Large advertisements at favorable rates. Special or read 
fug notices, legal advertisements, notices appearing in extra 
ordinary type, or in particular parts of the paper, at specla 
rates. Four insertions are rated in a month. 

• Entered at the S. F. Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



The N. Y. Oleo. Law Unconstitutional. 

Last week we noted in the I'kess that we had 
learned by telegraph that something had hap- 
pened to the New York law against the manu- 
facture of imitation butter. We now are fully 
informed by mail advices of the disaster which 
has befallen this enactment. The Court of Ap- 
peals which is the court of final resort in that I 
State, has decided that the following section of 
the laws contains legislation which i- in con- 
flict with rights granted by the State and na- 
tional constitutions: 

"No person shall manufacture out of any oleagi- 
nous substance or substances, or any compound of 
the same, other than that produced from unadulter- 
ated milk, or of cream from the same, any article 
designed to take the place of butter or cheese pro- 
duced from pure unadulterated milk, or cream of 
the same, or shall sell or offer for sale the same as an 
article of food. 1 his provision shall not apply to 
pure skim milk cheese, made from pure skim milk. 
Whoever violates the provisions of this section shall 
be guilty of a misdemeanor, and be punished by a 
fine of not less than $ioo norm jre th in $5 >o, or not 



ing of the law, gives pithily the grounds of the 

decision: 

"This prevents competition, and places a bar up- 
on progress and invention. It invades rights, both 
of person and property, guaranteed by the Consti- 
tution. The sale of a substitute for any article of 
manufacture is legitimate business, and if effected 
without deception, cannot be arbitrarily suppressed. 
The act is not aimed at deception, but goes further, 
and, in effect, creates monopoly destructive of rights 
protected by the Constitutions alike of the State and 
the United States." 

.ludge Pratt, who dissented from the Brook- 
lyn Court, and whose dissent is indorsed by the 
Court of Appeals, put the grounds still more 
forcibly, when he said: 

"It seem;, to me a citizen has a right to make any 
pure and wholesome article of food, and =ell it for 
what it actually is, and it is immaterial what lawful 
use shall be made of it afterward. If a man is too 
poor to buy good butter, I see no objection to his 
using oil, cheese, or honey, or any other substitute 
for butler. A law prohibiting the making of an iron 
rake to be used as a substitute for one made entirely 
of wood, could be passed with just .the same legal 
effect as a law providing that oleomargarine should 
not be made as a substitute for butter. ' 



SCIENTIFIC PRESS PATENT AGENCY. 
DEWEY & CO., Patent Solicitors. 

A.T. DEWEY W. B. EWER. G. H. STRONG. 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

Saturday, July 4, 1885. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



EDITORIALS— .lackson'* Advice to a Young Farmer; 
Soldiers of the Revolution, 1. The First Hall of Con- 
gress, 5- The Week; The N. Y. Oleo. Law Unconsti- 
tutional; The Washington Medal, 8. How Liberty 
Came to New York; Unveiling the Garfield Monument; 
Sericu'ture. 9. 

ILLUSTRATIONS —A Soldier of the Continental 
Army, 177B. 1. Assembly Hall of the First Continental 
Congress,; Fac-siinilic of the Broadside of the Declara- 
tion as First Generally Distributed in 17:0,5. told 
Medal Presented by Congress to Gen. Geo Washington, 
1776,8 Garlield Monument to be UnvcileJ on July 
Fourth, 9. 

ENTOMOLOGICAL.- A Satisfactory Grasshopper 
Killer; The Phylloxera in France; Arsenic for Grass- 
hoppers; Studying Our Insects, 10- 

CORRESPONDENCE. To Oregon by Wagon; The 
Advantages of Irrigation; Urban Farms at Sacramento; 
The English Sj arrow, 2. 

THE VINEYARD - Native Grapes of the United 
States, 'J 

POULTRY YARD.-Kaising Incubator Chickens; 
Hens and Chicks, 3. 4 

PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY.-Corporationsand 
the State; Rural Education; Grange Items; Monument 
for huel C. Gridley; Co operation Among Fruit Grow- 

THE HOME CIRCLE.— The Choice; Anecdotes of 
Washington; Births and Deaths in the White House; 
Women in Iowa; A Novel and Interesting Gift; The 
F'ourth of July; How a Dinner w„s Gained and Lo-t: 
Lincoln as an Office Seeker, 6. Chaff; Protecting the 
Washington Monument: Mr. Beeuher's Tom Trousers; 
Lincoln's First United States Court Case, 7. 

HORTICULTURE. -Meeting of State Horticultural 
Society. 10. 



Business Announcements. 

Land for Sale— Amos Adams, S. Y. 

Durham Bull Wanted — F., S. F. 

Rosendahls Nursery— C. P. Walton, Fresno, Cal. 

Fruit Evaporator — W. P. Haber, Fresno, Cal. 

Spray Pump Cal. Fuc Apparatus Utg Co., S. F. 

New Home Sewing .Machine Company S. F. 

Windmill* W,,odin , Si Little, S. K. 

Sheep -Mrs. K. McC. Wilson, Elk Grove, Col. 

i.i |„ - ( has. Rhine, Clayton, Cal. 

German Saving- and Lean Society— S. F. 

h in. Institute— Rev. E. B. Church, S. F. 

<*" See Advertising Columns. 



The Week. 

It is Fourth of July week, and the holiday 
feeling is at its hight. The Produce Kxchange 
has taken a whole week of it. The wholesale 
merchants of the city have agreed to take both 
Friday and Saturday, so that the greater busi- 
ness of the city will close on Thursday night 
and re-open on Monday morning. This long 
respite will send all city people who can escape, 
into the quiet of the country. For those who 
remain and for those from the country who 
come to hear the noise of the city for a change, 
there will be quite a demonstration in honor of 
the day. In the morning there will be the 
usual street parade of military, civic and trade 
organizations with the department of the prrv- 
tesqvtt or horribles, well developed. In the 
afternoon there will be the unveiling of the 
(iarfield monument at Golden Gate Park. Dur- 
ing the day there will be sailing and rowing 
contests upon the bay. In the evening the 
literary exercises will be held in the Mechanics' 
Institute Pavilion. Kight brass bands have been 
engaged by the committee, and there promises 
to be no lack of soul inspiring strains at all the 
exercises of the day. Fire works will be re- 
leased from Telegraph Hill and Central Park at 
eight o'clock in the evening. 

In the interior there will be local celebrations 
at many points in which the fire companies will 
occupy their usual prominent position. At 
Sicramento the celebration promises to be the 
best ever held in the city. The street parade 
will be followed by literary exercises at the 
Capitol, and in the afternoon there will be a 
host of attractive things at Agricultural Park. 
In the evening a Mardi (iras procession armed 
with blue lights and Roman candles will light 
the way for the rising moon. 




' put upon tbe market at 10 cents per pound, 
and for that reason is the article that so dis- 
astrously effects the dairy interests of the coun- 

■ try. This decision will enable the butterine 
manufacturers to place a great temptation be- 
fore retail grocers, and make it much more dif- 
ficult to prevent deceptive sales of dairy pro- 
ducts." 

It must be understood that the decision of the 
New York court of appeals does not militate 
at all against any enactment which provides 
that bogus dairy products shall not be "sold as 
genuine. Thus it does not affect the California 
law or other similar enactments which prevail 
in nearly all States of the Union. Of course 
the effect will be worse than if the New York 
dairymen had not insisted upon the prohibition 
of manufacturing and had met the material as 
California dairymen met it, by insisting that it 
be sold only for what it is, and that the con- 
sumer be made aware of the fact that he is 
buying or eating a bogus product. Nothing in 
the decision will prevent the New York Dairy 
Commissioner from proceeding with his suits 
against all who are deceiving people by selling 
tallow and lard emulsions as butter. It would 
be better, of course, to have made the entire 
group of imitations illegitimate from the mo- 
ment of their existence, bnt that, according to 
the New York decision, does not seem possible 
to accomplish. 



GOLD MEDAL PRESENTED BY CONGRESS TO GENERAL WASHINGTON. 



less than six months' or more than one year's im- 
prisonment, or both such fine and imprisonment for 
the first offence, and by imprisonment for one year 
for each subsequent offence." 

This act was signed by Governor Cleveland 
on April 25, 1884. Shortly afterwards, says 
the Kitral Xnc Yorb r, Morris Marx, a grocer 
of New York, was arrested for selling oleomar- 
garine under its own name in violation of this 
statute, and fined $100 in the Police Court. 
The case was appealed to test the constitution- 
ality of the law. A similar case also occurred 
in Brooklyn, and that together with a large num- 
ber of others brought against dealers in other 
places by the State Dairy Commissioner, has 
been held in suspense awaiting the decision of 
the Marx test case. The Supreme Bench, gen- 
eral term in New York city, affirmed the con- 
stitutionality of the law. The general term of 
the Supreme Court, Judges Davis, Brady and 
Daniels, sitting in Brooklyn, considered the law 
unconstitutional, but affirmed the sentence of 
the lower court in order that the case might be 
decided finally by the Court of Appeals. 

On Tuesday, June 22d, the Court of Appeals, 
which overrules all the lower courts, and is the 
court of final resort in New York State, de- 
clared the law unconstitutional. Judge Rapallo 
wrote the lengthy opinion, in which the whole 
court concurs. The following passage, in speak- 



The New York law was modeled upon that 
of Missouri, which the court of highest juris- 
diction in that State had declared constitutional 
before the passage of the New York law, and it 
was upon the opinion of that court that the 
New York Legislature based its prohibitory 
act. There was at the time considerable doubt 
among lawyers whether the Missouri decision 
would stand. 

In an interview with a reporter of the Albany 
Anjw, Dairy Commissioner Brown admitted 
that the law was objectionable, as it would 
prohibit the manufacture and sale of any ole- 
aginous substance, no matter how beneficial it 
might be. In that sense it shuts the door to 
inventive genius and its products, and becomes 
so sweeping in its prohibition that it exceeds 
the knowledge and power the Legislature has 
upon the subject. This decision will render it 
more difficult to prosecute violators of this law. 
"We have had," he went on, "but a few cases 
in which this legal question could be raised. 
Nearly all of our prosecutions have been baaed 
upon evidence where retail dealers have sold 
butterine for butter, and the deception was 
plainly apparent. Oleomargarine is not manu- 
factured any more, because it is too expensive, 
and cannot be produced and sold at a profit for 
much less than butter, while butterine can be 



The Washington Medals. 

Hardly any subject could be more appropri- 
ate to the celebration of the national holiday, 
and at the same time furnish information which 
the younger generation know little of, than that 
which we have chosen for illustration on 
this page— the Washington medals. The en- 
graving on this page shows the gold medal pre- 
sented to (ieorge Washington by Congress on 
the evacuation of Boston; also, Fi<».:l, the arms 
of the Washington family, and, Fig. 2, the seal 
used by General Washington. 

The gold medal commemorative of the evacu- 
ation of Boston became the property of George 
Steptoe Washington, the son of Samuel Wash- 
ington, who was the General's elder brother. 
The next owner of the medal was Dr. Samuel 
Walter Washington, eldest son of George Step- 
toe Washington. On the decease of the doctor 
at Hasewood, Virginia, in 1831, his widow be- 
came possessed of the relic. She is still living. 
She had given it to her only son, George Lafay- 
ette Washington, who had married the daughter 
of her brother, the Rev. JohuB. Clemson, of 
Claymont, Delaware. On the recent decease of 
George Lafayette Washington, the medal be- 
came the property of his widow, Mrs. Ann Bull 
Washington, from whom with proper certificates 
and vouchers, by the generous co-operation of 
fifty citizens of Boston, it has now been secured 
to the permanent ownership of the city of Bos- 
ton, with which it has been so gratefully ident- 
ified, and has been deposited in the public 
library. 

Thus it appears thai, the medal has been 
transmitted through the descendants, in suc- 
cessive generations, of General Washington's 
elder brother. They have fully appreciated its 
intrinsic and symbolic value, and have anxious- 
ly taken care for its safety under the risks and 
perils which have attended its preservation. 
It is, itself, a most beautiful and perfect speci- 
men of workmanship of the die and mint, and 
is without a blemish or any perceptible wear of 
its sharp outlines. During our civil war its 
then owner, George Lafayette Washington, 
was residing eleven miles from Harper's Ferry, 
on the main route to Winchester, where the 
belligerents held alternate possession. The 
medal, in it- original case of green seal skin, 
lined with velvet, was enveloped in cotton, 
and, deposited in a box, was buried in the dry 
cellar of a venerable mansion where General 
Washington usually spent many months of the 
genial portion of the year. The original case, 
which fell into decay by this exposure, accom- 
panies the medal in its present repository. 

The medal, of which the engraving gives a 
fac rimUe, was the only gold medal given by 
Congress to General Washington. Between the 
date of March 25, 1776, when this gift was be- 
stowed by a resolve of Congress, and the year 
178U, by votes of the same body, a series of 10 
more gold medals was struck at the Paris mint, 
commemorative of the great events and the great 
men of the War of the Revolution. All the 
"Washington Medals" are now in Boston, 



July 4, 1885.] 



fACIFie F^URAls f RESS. 



9 



How Liberty Came to New York. 



The Reception of the Bartholdi Statue. 
No theme could be more appropriate to an 
Issue of the Press, which is, in part, given to 
patriotic thoughts, than a sketch of the scene 
and incidents at the formal reception of the 
splendid gift of the French people to the 
United States. The arrival of the Bartholdi 
statue seems to have awakened the people of 
our great metropolis to some appreciation of 
what the gift was intended to signify, and the 
day the French ship "Isere," which bore the 
statue, reached New York harbor, was given 
to a grand pageant on the waters of the bay 
and the streets of the city. 

Thursday, June 18th, was Liberty's day. 
Bunting fluttered from nearly every building 
in the lower part of the city. Paris was trans- 
ferred to New York. The tricolor waved in 
triumph, intertwined with the stars ands'ripes. 
The sun rose in a red haze and the white clouds 
looked like snow banks in the distance. A 
gentle breeze stirred the flags and made the 
throngs hurrying to the various pleasure boats 
feel pleased. The waters of the bay danced in 
little waves and away in the distance the white 
hull of the "Isere," waiting for the great naval 
demonstration, looked like a graceful swan, 
floating at anchor. White sails and steam 
yachts passed to and fro, and monster pleasure 
steamers with bands playing and thousands 
cheering headed down the bay. 

About the middle of the forenoon a large 
ferry boat, the "Atlantic," steamed out from 
the B ittery, bearing the official welcoming 
party — the high functionaries of New York 
City and others of national fame, also French 
citizens of high repute. The "Atlantic" was 
decorated with the fligs of Germany, France, 
Russia, City and State of New York, and a 
pagoda at the head of the engine house was 
wrapped in the American flag, which also flew 
from the flagstaffs of the vessel. The "Atlan- 
tic" steamed down through the Narrows to the 
anchorage of the "Isere." The sight was very 
pretty. The French frigate "La Flore" and 
the "Isere" were at anchor, with the ships 
decorated with signal flags. In the distance 
were the United States' vessels also decorated. 
Excursion vessels, with thousands of persons 
on board and displaying numerous flags, were 
in the vicinity, and when the "Atlantic" ap- 
proached saluted her with whistles. At 10:30 
o'clock the "Atlantic" drew up by the side of 
the "Isere," whose officers were on the bridge 
in full uniform and saluted the vessel by raising 
their caps. The sailors, having on their caps 
the words "Flore and Isere," were in their 
"Sunday best," and waited at the side of the 
"Isere" until the "Atlantic" got alongside, 
occasionally saluting by raising and waving 
their caps. The "Fiore" was at anchor aomu 
distance off, but both vessels, "La Flore" and 
the "Isere," were decked with flags, with the 
United States rl ig at the main and the French 
flags at the fore and mizzenmasts. When the 
welcoming party began to board the "Isere" 
the Eleventh Regiment band played the "Mar- 
seillaise, "and werereceived with marked honors. 
The Mayor extended to the officers the hos- 
pitality of the city, after which the Mayor and 
Aldermen returned to the "Atlantic," the 
American committee, with Senator Evarts, 
remaining on the "Isere." 

The Naval Parade. 
The line of parade was then formed at the 
report of a gun from Sandy Hook. As the 
"Isere" got into line the band on 'he "Atlantic" 
played "See the Conquering Hero Comes." 
The "Omaha" and "Powhatan" led the line, 
and were followed by La Flore, the "Isere," 
the "Atlantic" and the other steam vessels, all 
gaily decorated. At the start there were only 
47 vessels in line, but before the parade reached 
the forts of the Narrows the parade had in- 
creased to several hundred craft of all kinds, 
and the line was over a mile in extent. Stead- 
ily the long line moved up through the Nar- 
rows, and as the foremost vessel neared the 
forts the "Powhatan" began a salute. Soon 
after "La Flore" bagan firing from both sides 
in rapid succession and with heavy guns. The 
"Omaha" discharged her guns. As the French 
vessel was nearly opposite the forts, the bar- 
bette guns of Fort Hamilton belched forth her 
thunders, responded to by the guns of Fort 
Wadsworth; the French frigate at the same 
time firing from both sides. It was like a 
mimic battle, occasionally relieved by the 
strains of music from the many pleasure vessels, 
loaded down with passengers, that had by this 
time joined the fleet. Amid the strains the 
sound of the "Marseillaise" could be plainly 
heard. The sounds and sights were very excit- 
ing, and on both sides of the Narrows and up 
on the hights of Staten Island, could be seen 
thousands of persons watching the parade. 

By this time vessels of all sizes had joined in 
the parade. Little tugs and launches, yachts 
propelled by steam and sail, and even rowboats 
were on all sides. The fleet moved slowly so 
that all could join in. The firing of guns was 
echoed back with curious effect, while over the 
harbor hung the smoke of the burned powder. 

The pleasure boats, with their thousands of 
passengers, moved along in the rear of the war 
vessels, and occasionally some yacht would 
belch forth a report from a gun. Looking back 
from the upper deck of the "Atlantic," the line 



of vessels seemed to be never ending, while on 
all side.s were vessels of every size. 

Off Bedloe's Island. 
As the fleet approached Bedloe's Island, the 
American men-of-war and the French frigate 
"Flore" drew on one side. The "Isere" moved 
out of line and dropped her anchor. Then be- 
gan a scene that exceeded anything ever before 
witnessed. Hundreds of steam vessels, with 
whistles of all sizes and sounds, were let loose, 
and the bands on all the vessels began to play. 
The sailors on the "Isere" seemed wild with ex- 
citement, and danced, jumped and waved hats 
and flags with great enthusiasm. The guns of 
the war vessels belched forth their thunders, 
which were answered with the barbette guns of 
Forts Columbus and Wood and the casements 
of Castle William. The "Isere" dipped her flags, 
the officers waved caps and handkerchiefs, the 
French sailors jumped with wild enthusiasm, 
and the echoes answered back the noise. Oae 
gun, in being discharged, sent forth a ring of 
smoke which floated for a long time. This was 
said to be the wedding ring between France and 
the United States. Bedloe's Island was 
crowded with people. The pedestal was deco- 



difficulties overcome in the cause of liberty, were eag- 
erly listened to, and an enthusiasm was aroused 
which added the point and meaning of practical 
demonstration to the speculations of French philoso- 
phy. From that time to this the bond of sympathy 
which united the two people has never weakened. 
Washington and Lafayette! Their names stand for 
all that has been highest and noblest in the political 
history of centuries. In the person of Lafayette 
was embodied the spirit of revolt against the dead 
systems of government of the past; in that of Wash- 
ington the spirit of hope for the future — a future 
of freedom which was to bring peace and prosperity 
to millions unborn; while in both were united the 
loftiness of purpose and unflinching courage in the 
face of difficulties, which are the indispensable requi- 
sites of greatness. 

The splendid gift of the French people which you 
have brought to our shores is, therefore, deeply sig- 
nificant. It is a pledge of the present existence of 
those friendly relations which mark the common his- 
tory of the two nations in the past, and is a pleasant 
augury of their continuance in the future. As it is 
to France, and through France to the United States, 
that the spreid of popular government in Europe is 
largely due, so it is but appropriate that an enduring 
monument at this gateway of the world's commerce 
should remind all comers of the fact. And the art- 
ist has caught the inspiration of history. The con- 



The bronze statue and the other metal poi 
of the monument arrived in this city aboi. 
month ago, and have been carefully guarded 
from view. 

The engraving on this page shows the statue 
as it will appear when the drapery is withdrawn 
on the Fourth. Mr. Happersberger's design is 
a massive pedestal of granite, surmounted with 
a bronze statue of Gen. Garfield, standing with 
a scroll in one hand, the other resting upon the 
arm which holds the scroll. A figure of Co- 
lumbia, sitting in a mourning attitude, and two 
bass-reliefs, all of bronze, are attached to the 
pedestal, the pedestal to rest on a solid founda- 
tion of concrete or brick. The total cost of the 
monument has been about $25,000. It will 
henceforth be one of th^ great objec's of inter- 
est in Golden Gate Park , 




GARFIELD MONUMENT TO BE UN VEILED ON JULY FOURTH. 



rated with French and American flags, which 
were lowered in salute as the French officers 
landed. The guns at the foot of the pedestal 
belched forth, and were answered with guns 
from "La Flore" and the U. S. vessels. The cere- 
monies at the foot of the pedestal were very 
impressive, and were enlivened by the music of 
the French singing societies. They were wit- 
nessed by hundreds of persons. 

Thus the great statue reached its future 
home. After the naval display was over, the 
French officers were escorted to New York 
City, the streets were paraded in the sight of 
thousands of cheering citizens, who lined the 
sidewalks and covered the buildings. F'inally 
came the grand banquet at Delmonico's, after 
which sentiment began to take words rather 
than expression by common and brazen instru- 
ments. We give the speech of Mayor Grace, 
of New York City, as a type of the sentiment 
which ruled the popular mind: 

Of the many causes, which during the last century 
operated in awakening in the people of France that 
burning desire for liberty which was to set all Eu- 
rope ablaze, and which finally found organized ex- 
pression in the constituent assembly of '39, two were 
permanent— one was the literary influence exerted 
by a school of writers, whose fierce blows shook to 
its foundation the fabric of absolutism so strongly 
reared by Louis XIV. , and found an echo on this 
side of the Atlantic in the teaching: of our own Jef- 
ferson and Franklin; the other was the example set 
by the new world in their successful struggle against 
the same absolutism which the English king sought 
to perpetuate over the colonies. The stories told by 
our allies on their return of the deeds done, and the 



ception of liberty enlightening the world is deeply 
poetic, because it is deeply true, and because the 
idea is great the grandeur demands its association 
with the gigantic in art, which has a beauty of its 
own above and beyond the canons of strict criti- 
cism. May it stand as an imperishable monument 
of the ideas with which it is associated, which are 
themselves immortal and unchangeable. 



Unveiling the Garfield Monument. 

One of the most notable features of the ob- 
servance of the national holiday in this city 
will be the unveiling of the Garfield monument 
at Golden Gate park. This monument was pro- 
vided for by popular subscriptions from citizens 
of California, and the corner-stone of the ped- 
estal was laid at the great Triennial Conclave 
of Knights Templar in 1883. The committee 
having the choice of design entrusted to them, 
arranged that all who desired, submit models 
for their examination, and the cnoice fell upon 
the design of Frank Happersberger, a native of 
San Francisco, and now 25 years of age. Mr. 
Happersberger has been engaged in Europe for 
the last two years or more in superintending 
the construction of the monument. The stone- 
work upon which the statue is to rest has been 
constructed for some time, and has no doubt 
been seen by all who nave visited the park. 



Sericulture. 

As has been ^previously stated in the Press, 
we have two agencies in active operation in the 
State in promotion of the silk industry. Lest 
any teader may have overlooked the former an- 
nouncement, we will repeat that the Ladies' 
Silk Culture Association of California, which is 
now under the patronage of the United States 
Government, has established itself at Pied- 
mont, on the hills back of Oakland, and will 
estab ish its filature there. They are prepared 
to buy cocoons, and any correspondence ad- 
dressed to Charles Wolcott Brooks, San Fran- 
cisco, will receive attention. 

The other California institution is the Cali- 
fornia State Board of Silk Culture, with offices 
and filature at 21 Montgomery avenue, San 
Francisco. They are also prepared to buy 
cocoons, or to reel them and return the product 
to the growers. Their reeling- school is now in 
operation, and we understand that 26 pupils 
have enrolled themselves up to date. Both our 
silk institutions are now working in harmony, 
and there is every prospect of good results. In 
other States there is also good work being done. 
We receive circulars and announcements from 
them, and shall give quotations from them from 
time to time to supplement the work of the 
local agencies, and increase the general informa- 
tion of our readers. 

The Woman's Silk Culture Association of the 
United States has its headquarters at Philadel- 
phia. We have just received from the presi- 
dent, Mrs. John Lucas, a circular in relation to 
the conditions existing in the cocoons which 
are received by that society, and which may 
contain hints to our own growers. We quote 
as follows : 

Complaints have come to the association of 
the small prices paid for cocoons, and this con- 
dition needs explanation. The small crops 
ranging from one pound upwards come to us 
from all sections of the United States, and are 
raised principally by inexperienced culturists. 
The seed (or silk worm eggs) is often of poor 
quality, especially if raised from imperfect co- 
coons. Such worms are feeble, aud produce 
only a sin ill quantity of silk; they are often fed 
on mixed food, or under fed, or over-fed, owing 
to the want of knowledge on the part of the 
culturist. In the next stage of the industry, 
we meet wi h similar difficulties in bad results 
from stifling. If the cocoons are allowed to re- 
main too long before they are stifled, the worm 
begins to eat through the cocoon, which ruins it 
for reeling. If they are stifled too soon or be- 
fore the chrysalis has dried, the cocoon is im- 
perfect. If heated to too high a temperature, 
or scorched in the stilling, the silk is damaged. 
All these conditions render the silk almost 
valueless. Again, another cause of deprecia- 
tion is the quality of waste silk. Commercial 
waste silk, properly prepared and shipped, 
should be worth from 50 to 80 cents per pound; 
but commercial waste silk is clean, well cured, 
well packed, pierced cocoons, from which the 
worm has escaped in the form of a moth; and 
for this product there is a ready market. Such 
waste as the association has generally received 
has been badly raised — badly cured cocoons con- 
taining the chrysalis, and from each of which 
the manufacturer must remove 'he chrysalis be- 
fore the cocoon can be utilized, an operation re- 
ducing the value still more, as additional labor 
must be paid to prepare it for the mills, and the 
imperfect product is valueless for reeling, and 
difficult to dispose of at any price — such waste 
compares very unfavorably with the standard 
waste of silk of commerce. To become a nation 
of silk-raisers, we have mush to learn; and the 
association will endeavor to issue quarterly 
bulletins to all correspondents to aid them in 
perfecting this new industry. The association 
is about to enlarge the filature, which will en- 
able them to run the cocoons off more rapidly 
and render more prompt returns. The first 
bulletin issued will be on the subject of trees 
and worm-food. The association is ready to 
give information and to receive the coming 
crops of cocoons at such values as reeling the 
silk will warrant; to direct the formation of 
auxiliary associations, asking those interested 
to remember we are all working to establish for 
our women and children a new industry that 
must eventually add wealth to our country. 



10 



f ACIFI6 f^URAb PRESS. 



[July i, 1885 



J^OF^TIQUbTUflE. 



Meeting of State Horticultural Scciety. 

The regular monthly mee iDg of the State 
Horticultural Society was held at the rooms of 
the State Board of Horticulture, June 20th. 
I 'resident Hilgardin the chair. 

Dr. S. H. Hall, 326 Kearny street, 0. Den- 
nis, of Mount Eden, and .Julius Chester, of San 
Francisco, were elected regular members. 

A. Block, of Santa Clara, and W. Barry, of 
Centerville, were nominated for membership. 
The Centennial Cherry. 

The committee appointed at the last meeting 
to examine this new fruit sent in by Leonard 
Coatee, of Napa, reported as follows : " We 
recommend the cheny as one of excellent keep- 
ing qualities and flavor, and confidently recom- 
mend it as a valuable acquisition to the fruits 
of California. W. C. Blackwood, James Shinn, 
Committee." The report was referred back to 
the committee to add a description of the fruit. 

W. A. Meeker exhibited some fine samples of 
fruit dried at Los (iatos by his new sun-drying 
apparatus. Also a sample of peaches smoothed 
by a brush-machine which he had invented to 
remove the objectionable fur from the fruit. 

Bsnjamin Sanford, of Smartsville, sent a 
cherry plum for identification, thinking it might 
hi the myrobolan. 

R. J. Trumbull, Chairman of the Memorial 
Committee, presented plans for the erection of 
a monument over the grave of ihe late W. H. 
Jessup, who had died at his post of duty while 
acting as the society's commissioner at the 
World's Fair. Mr. Trumbull stated that an 
appropriate monument of Scotch granite could 
be erected for the sum of $230. 

It was suggested that the amount due from 
premiums awarded at the New Orleans Exposi- 
tion would be rightly spent if devoted to this 
purpose. Senator De Long said that two pre- 
miums, amounting to about §40, had been 
awarded him, and he would donate that to the 
society. Colonel Andrews was asked by Judge 
Blackwood what was the prospect of the New 
< >rle.ins premiums being paid. He replied that 
the premiums would probably be paid first of 
all, as Congress had passed a bill appropriating 
$865,000 for premiums and expenses, outside of 
the Louisiana premiums, and the premiums 
were to be paid before the expenses. He said 
that the State Horticultural Society, for the 
fruit exhibition which preceded the ci rus fruit 
show, had been awarded eleven silver medals 
and thirty-six premiums, which would 
realize about SI ,,">00 cash. He spoke respect- 
fully and affectionately of his late associate 
commissioner at New Orleans and said that 
Mr. Jessup preformed every duty faithfully and 
honestly, in fact, did all in his power for the 
benefit of California. Col. Andrews explained 
bis dealings with the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Co. He felt that they had acted unfairly in 
claiming for themselves space which had been 
given to the State and in regard to freight 
rates. He returned thanks to Senator De Long, 
Filcher and Ready, who had worked hard at 
Sacramento, in getting the State appropriation 
for him, and especially commended the work of 
Mr. W. S. Klee, of the State University, who 
had been given 81,200 and had not expended it 
all, returning a considerable part of it; and that 
he (Col. A.) had triumphed over all the hinder- 
ances placed in his way and successfully exhib 
ited the products of this State at the World's 
Fair, in the Crescent City. He would be able 
to return to the State a part of the $10,000 ap- 
propriated by the laet Legislature. He also 
described his service to the citrus fruit interest 
by paying the expenses of the jurors while they 
were waiting for the California exhibits to ar- 
rive. 

The motion was made and carried that the 
memorial committee wait until it can be seen 
what money may be available, before takingac- 
tion on the monument. 

Fruit Shipping. 
The sul ject for the day— "The shipping of 
fruit by fruit growers". was taken up. W. W. 
Smith, of Vacaville, was the first to speak on 
the subject of shipping fruit East. He had 
shipped 300 pounds of cherries to Chicago, 
which had arrived in good condition and paid a 
little better than if he had sent thein to San 
Francisco — enough better to make him try it 
more extensively next year. A carload of his 
fruit had been sold by Hixon, J usti & Co., of 
Chicago; the peaches brought from 12 to 15 



cents a pound, plums 12 cents, and apricots 
from t> to 8 cents. The Alexander was a poor 
peach for shipment, he said, but the Waterloo 
and Strawberry peaches were excellent for that 
purpose. 

He packed apricots and p'.ums in five-pound 
baskets and these again in large crates so se- 
cured by cleats that they could not jar. Cher- 
ries he packed in shallow and well ventilated 
boxes with a sheet of paper placed over the 
fruit to absorb the moisture. He said it would 
be an excellent idea for the railioads to put 
rubber bumpers between the cats containing 
fruit, to reduce the injury from jarring. 

James Shinn stated that he packed his fruit 
in ten-pound cases, with air holes for ventila- 
tion, and packed the cases very closely to 
gether. Instead of ordinary brown paper he 
thought, as suggested by Col. \Yebb, that blot- 
ting paper should be used as it would take up 
the moisture better. 

J. S. Shearman of Vacaville, had been send- 
ing fruit to New York as well as Chicago. 
The fruit was sent to friends by express from 
Chicago. He presented the following letter 
that >t might "speak for itself:" 

Walworth, N. V., June 17, 1885. 
J. S. Shearman Esq. , Vacaville, C.il. DearSik: — 
Your card of the 10th inst. is received, and also the 
box of beautiful fruit, apricots and plums, in splen- 
did condition. 1 can hardly realize that they could 
come through so nicely. Accept my sincere thanks 
for the same. They are a splendid reminder of 
some of the wonderful sights 1 saw in Southern 
California in 1377. 1 think you have the most de- 
lightful climate on this continent, and I trust you are 
enjoying prosperity in such a beautiful country. 
Napa Valley is especially beautiful. 

F. G. Yeomans. 

W. C. Blackwood, of Haywards, stated he 
had shipped 12 boxes of cherries to Chicago, 
which had arrived in good condition. One car- 
load of fruit Ifcad been sent fro.riT Sin Lorenzo to 
Chicago which the consignee had reported to 
have arrived in prime condition, but later news- 
paper accounts said that two-thirds of the fruit 
was spoiled. The shippers had been telegraph- 
ing to f'ofter Brothers, the consignees, but 
could get no answer. They thought there was 
something crooked about the affair. If the pro 
ducers could lay fruit down in Chicago or other 
Eastern cities at freight rates of two cents a 
pouud, the market was open for plums, cher- 
ries, apricots and early peaches. It was neces- 
sary for a reduction of freight rates, as the pres- 
ent rates to Chicago averaged about four cents a 
pound. It they could get better terms from the 
transportation companies they could make 
Kastern fruit shipments pay. At the present 
rates none but the rich could consume California 
fruits in the East. There must be a concerted 
effort to compel transportation companies to 
reduce freight rates. If fruits could be laid 
down in the Eastern cities at reasonable rates, 
a very large trade might soon be worked up. 
The speaker believed that there was an under- 
current among old fruit shippers and dealers to 
have the railroatls keep fruit freight rates up. 
When the California producers can ship their 
own fruits to Eistern markets, there is no profit 
for speculators who do not want California 
fruit-growers to compete wi h them. As long 
as growers work through speculators they will 
always remain in the background. Co-oper- 
ation among growers is the only proper method 
for enlarging the market so as to inclq.de many 
cities that would depend on this State for an 
early supply of fruits. If the shippers can get 
freight rates down to two and two and a half 
cents per pouud, one and one-half cents profit 
per pound would pay the growers, and the con- 
sumers could get the fruit at about four cents 
to four and one-half cents per pounel. 

R. B. Blowers, of Woodland, thought that 
they should have a responsible agent in the 
East to receive the fruit, as they could tell but 
little of the conelition of the fruit upon arrival 
in the East, except what the dealers reported 
to them. 

A Report from Chicago. 

The secretary read selections from commu- 
nications from J. M. Hixson, of Chicago, pro- 
posing a joint stock fruit-shipping company 
among growers. The following letter was 
received too late to read at the meeting, but is 
here introduced in the report: 

To the Secretary of the State Horticultural 
Society: — As the subject for discussion by your 
society this month is "The shipment of fruit 
by growers," and as we feel a deep interest in 
all that concerns California and her fruit inter- 
ests, we think a few remarks giving our impres- 
sions, gained by our observations here this 
spring, would not be out of place. In the first 
place, it has been a recognized fact for some 
time past that the immense amount of fruit 
raised in California had far overtaxed the 



capacity of our local markets, and the disposal 
of the surplus becomes a matter of serious con 
sideration for the growers. Of course there 
will continue to be a large amount canned and 
dried, but in order to relieve the market of the 
surplus during the rush of the season, there 
must be a large amount shipped "green." The 
next question is, is it better for the growers to 
.study the shipping business thoroughly and 
intelligently, and where one has enough of his 
own ship that individually, and where a num 
ber of small ones are near together combine, j 
and by joining forces load their cars, each one 
bearing his pro rata of expense ; or is it better 
to sit back and wait for the Eistern specula- 
tors to come in and buy just what they know 1 
they can realize large profits on, and let the 
balance go to waste? 

After our arrival here last spring when we be- j 
gan talking of California fruits coming here in ' 
"large quaati'ies, ' the old conservative mer- 
chants of the street, as well as the general run 
of people we met, poohpoohed the idea, saying: I 
"You cm sell a small amount of your California 1 
fruits, bat only a limited amount, for they are ! 
so high no one but a bank president or a rela 1 
tive of Yanderbilt can use them. Soma of the j 
middle classes may buy them once as a curios- 

It seemed like a tale from the Arabian Nights 
when we told them that California cherries (the 
like of which they had never seen before) 
could be sold here at 12.J to 15 cents per pound 
and still leave the grower a fair profit, and 
when our solid car of cherries arrrYed here from 
Hiywartls it excited more talk and comment 
than anything from the Sta'e ti ice the fi st car 
of pears. Since the first introduction of Califor- 
nia fruits on this side of the Mississippi river, 
the main idea has been to only have them come 
in limited quantities and to keep prices up to a 
fancy figure, and to hold out the idea to the 
California growers that risks of shipment were 
so great that they had better sell at home at 
any price than *•• chance shipping on their own 
accounts. As the rule of our present world is 
"Look out for No. 1; never mind the rest" the 
argument waa a specious one and the growers 
readily accepted it. The experience we have 
had with cherries, peaches, plums and apricots 
has proven the fact that with the exercise of a 
little care and judgment, fruit can be shipped 
here by passenger train in four and one-half 
days' time with but little more risk than to 
San Francisco. 

There is one thing, however, that must be 
kept constantly in mind (and those of your 
members who have visited the World's Fair at 
New Orleans and the Eastern country this 
spring, will remember I, and that is, the fruit- 
growers on this side and the importers of 
foreign fruits, recogniz? in California the most 
formidable competitor that has yet appeared in 
the field. With that fact in view, it behooves 
our growers to use extra pains in selecting and 
packing their fruits, so as to sustain our repu- 
tation for good fruits, well handled. There 
must be no Chinese packing or false topping off 
it we wish to hold the market. 

Chicago to-day is the main distributing point 
for California fruits, and even right here in this 
city nine tenths of the people do not know 
what California fruit is, except from hearsay, 
and they probably never will if the old course 
is pursued; that is, selling to the speculators, 
who would rather sell 100 boxes at 50 per cent 
profit than 500 boxes at 10 per cent profit. 

When we think of the wonderful producing 
capacity of our glorious State, as compared 
with the sm ill population, and then look at a 
place like this with ten times the population 
within a radius of 100 miles, and nearly all con- 
sumers, not producers, it is time some organized 
effort was made by our growers to reap the 
benefits of this trade. 

Our Horticultural Society has dons a great 
deal for the fruit interests of our State, but to 
our minds they have touched on no topic that 
is of more immediate importance than the one 
now uneler discussion. By systematic adver- 
tising and pushing, and the hearty co-operation 
of the leading growers, California oranges have 
been forced to the front this season, and we 
have made a name for them and created a de- 
mand that by next season will result in an im 
mense business for the citrus fruit raisers of our 
State. Our raisin and dried fruit shippers first 
showed their ability to forward goods to this 
market, and this season have developed the 
fact that orange men could ship here as safely 
as to San Francisco, and reap the benefit of a 
market 20 or 30 times larger than the local 
market, anil there is no reason why our growers 
of deciduous fruits shoulel not be able to do the 
same thing. 

We will be pleased to corresponel with any 
of them individually, and to furnish every in- 



formation in our power to aid in developing the 
I fruit trade of "our glorious California." — Hix 

SON, JusTI & Co., .'*.'/ South Water St., Chicaijo. 

A Committee to Gather Facts. 

Dr. Oibbons said he thought it would be a 
good idea to keep in a permanent form all the 
important facts concerning the shipping of fruit 
East for future reference. A motion was made 
and carried that a committee of from 3 to 5 be 
appointed by the chairman for that purpose. As 
a great deal will be learned about the Bubject 
during the next three months, the chairman 
was directeel to use his own judgment regarding 
the time of appointment. 

The meeting adjourned at the usual hour, 
after selecting as the subject of the next meet- 
ing, "Co-operation in regard to fruit raising and 
shipping." . 

Can Brlght's Disease be Cured? 

Mr George W. Kd wards is a well kmwn t'hiladelphiaii, 
now in middle lt'e. Mi. father was one of the niOBt pub 
He spirited men of the e^uaker City, and did much to im- 
prove the place by the erection of a number of hotels and 
other costl. edifices. Mr. .a>.K Sr., died about 2<> 
years ajo of it.'i iht's Diseas -, and so did his wife. The 
prgieit Mr. Kdwards tins inherited the di«easp, and at 
an early period in his life bccimc a confirmed invalid 
with but Utile ho e of recovery. 

A gentleman connecud with tl ■ press, who was threat 
ened with the Dime disease and had heard of Mr. Ed- 
wards recovery, recently <alled upon him and gives the 
following account of his interview. To the ipiestioa if Ii 3 
hal reilly been as gre^t a sufferer as repreiented, Mr. 
Edwards rei lied : 

"Yes, I had Bright'* Disease. My father and mother 
died with it. So did two cf my brothers. It came on 
DM slowly. I pas ed much albumen and many epithelial 
casts, winch are the sure ind cations of the disease. Fcr 
threj yea-s I was so prostrated as to l>e unable to attend 
to business. I was utterly exhausted. Not only was I 
not able to walk with comfort, but actual!) could hardlv 
walk at al'. 1 hardly averaged an hour's sleep in the 24 
X arly all the while 1 suffered with severe neuralgic pain 
in my head and rheumatic pains in my joints. My di 
gestion was miserable. I was nervous and continually 
disturbed. At the fct. Gorge hotel, where 1 lived, I 
found it impossible to take my meals at the table, for 
my nerves were in such a state 1 t. r the rattling of the 
knives and forks ivtn I me and oinpelltd uie to leave 
the dining room. The little I was able to eat was 
brought to my room 

"I wns in this cxhaust-.d condition when my friend. 
Mr. Arthur ilagan, of Front street, who had been made a 
new man by trie use of Compou.id Oxygen, said to me 
that he believed there would be some chance for me if I 
were to t y that treatment. A drowning man will catch 
at a straw antl I caught at this in my despe-ation, regard- 
ing it as little more than a straw. In about trn da>* 
after 1 began using it, the severe pains in my head were 
greatly relieved, and before many more days they wen- 
gone. Then I began to gain strength. Gradually the 
rhtumatic pains went away. My appetite improved. I 
soon became able to enjoy re'reshing sleep. For two 

t iths I toik the Oxyg n Treatment, daily mining. 

When I first began ti take it I was so weak that 1 could 
not inhale for more than ten or fifteen stconds. 1 began 
in March, 1082, and finished in May. By this time 1 »«« 
so well that I needed no more Oxygen. 

"ftu» I am able to attend to my business regularly and 
cheerfully. I live in the countn and come to town evei \ 
day. I sleep soundly: take a good deal of active exe.- 
cise; eat everything 1 want and my digestion is good." 

A "Treatise on Compound Ox\ gen," c uitaining a his- 
tory of the discovery and mode of action of this remark 
able curative agent, and a large record of surprising 
cures in e'onsumption, Catarrh, Neura'gia, Bronchitis, 
Asthma, etc. , and a wi le range of diseiscs, will be sent 
free. Address Drs. Stabks:y k Paukn, 1109 and 1111 
Uirard street, I'hiladc'phia. 

Orders for the Compound Oxygen Home T eatment will 
be tilled by H K. Mathews, 621 Powell street, betwesn 
Bush and Pine, San Francisco. 



To Tan Skins With For On.— Inquiry is 
frequently made at this office for the beBt re- 
cipe for tanning the skins of animals without 
injury to the fur. Isaac H. Bailey, add he is 
authority in such matters, publishes the follow 
ing formulas for accomplishing this in his Shot 
and Leathi r Reporter: Take two parts each of 
alum and salt, and one of saltpeter, all well 
pulverizeel. Clear the flesh of fatty matter. 
Sprinkle it white with mixture. Fold in edges 
aud roll up; remain four days, then wash with 
clean water, and then with soap and water. 
Full the .skin when drying, to make it soft. 
Another recipe is: Lay the wet skin on a 
smooth slab or a hard board ; scrape with a dull 
knife nntil all loose flesh and film is removed; 
then wash off in soft water. Take a glass or 
stone jar, put in an ounce of oil or vitriol and a 
gallon of rain or river water. Let it steep in 
this for about half an hour. Take it out, work 
it with the hands until dry, when it will be 
pliable antl soft. The more worked the softer. 
Use no grease. 

Teachf.k excursionists to the Hawaiian Is- 
lands should provide themselves with M tiller's 
Tourists' < i lasses. Special reduction for teach- 
err. 13."> Montgomery street, near Bush, oppo- 
site Occidental Hotel. x 

For a family medicine Ayer's sugar Coated Pillt- 
a-e unrivalled. They root out disease, as if by magic 

A ■■■ ■ 1 ■ 1 - I.ivcr Pills cure rheumatism" and headache. 




"NEW HOME" 

Leads all Others in Sales and Popularity. 

GIVES LESS TROUBLE. IS MORE SATISFYING. 

THE MOST ATTRACTIVE FOR DEALERS TO HANDLE. 



geo. h.'root, The New Home Sewing Machine Co., 



Manager 
PACIFIC COAST, 



Nos. 108 and 110 POST STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



tr 1 

Ul 

»-3 



Best 


Stand, 


Best 


Feed, 


Best 


Shuttle, 


Best 


Attachments, 


Best 


Woodwork, 


Best 


Wearing. 




Joly 4, 1885] 



fACIFie F^URAb fRESS. 



Ms apd banking, 



UNION SAVINGS BANK 

OAKLAND. CAL. 

CAPITAL $200 000 

RESERVED FUND $100,000 

ASSETS $1,931,000 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: 
A.C.Henry. J. We^ Martin, G. J. Ainswortn, 
J. C. Ainsworth, S. Huff, R. S. Farrelly, 

R. W. Kirkham, Samuel Woods, D. Henshaw Ward, 

Hiiam Tubbs,. H. A. Palmer. 

Wbbt MiRTis, Pres. H. A. Palmer, V. Pres. & Treas'r. 

INTEREST allowed upon all deposits remaining 
three calendar months, beginning from the first ol the 
month succeeding the date of deposit. 

Remittances from the country may be made by Express 
or Check upon Banks in San Francisco, and bo;k will 
be returned. 

LOANS made only upon Mortgage of Real 
Estate and Bonda at currerjt rates. 

GRANGERS' BANK 

OF CALIFORNIA, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Authorized Capital, - - $1,000,000 

In 10,000 Shares of $100 each. 

Capital Paid up in Gold Coin, $645,360. 

Reserved Fund and Paid dp Stock, $21,178. 
OFFICERS: 

A. D. LOGAN President 

I. C. STEELE Vice-Presidett 

ALBERT MONTPELLIER Cashier and Manager 

FRANK McMULLEN Secretary 

DIRECTORS: 

A. T>. LOGAN, President Colusa County 

H J LEWELLING, Napa County 

J. H. GARDINER Rio Vista, Cal 

T. E TYNAN Stanislaus County 

URIAH WOOD Santa Clara County 

J. C. MERYFIELD Solano County 

H. M. LARUE Yolo County 

I. C. STEELE San Mateo County 

THOMAS McCONNELL Sacramento County 

C. J. CRESSEY Merced County 

SENECA EWER Napa County 

CURRENT ACCOUNTS are opened and conducted in the 

usual way, bank books balanced up, and statements of 

accounts rendered every month. 
LOANS ON WHEAT and country produce a specialty. 
COLLECTIONS throughout the Country are made 

promptly and proceeds remitted as directed. 
GOLD and SILVER deposits received. 
CERTIFICATES of DEPOSIT issued payable on demand. 
BILLS OF EXCHANGE of the Atlantic States bought 

and sold. ALBERT MONTPELLIER, 

Cashier and Manager. 

San Francisco, Jan. 15, 1882. 

STOCKTON 

SAVINGS and LOAN SOCIETY, 

(Incorporated August, 1867.) 
STOCKTON, .... CALIFORNIA. 

Paid up Capital, $500,000. 

Surplus, $152,634. 

L. U. SH1PPEE, President. 
F. M. WEST, Cashier. S. S. L1TTLEHALE, Ass't Cashier 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: 



L. U. SlIIPPEE, 

R. B. Lane, 
Ciias. Haas, 
A. W. Simpson, 
J. H. O'Brien, 
Wm. Inglis, 



R. Gnekow, 
Otis Perrin, 
H. T. Dorrancb, 
F. Arnold, 
M. L. Hewitt, 
Chas. Grupb, 
John Dlcker. 



Detachable Link Belting 



CONVEYOR 
CHAINS 

for the 

Pacific Coast Trade 

ALL SIZES 

Carried in Stock. 

ORDERS 

promptly killed. 

STEARNS 

MFG CO., 
Saw-Mill 

Machinery 



29 & 31 Spear 
St , S. F. 




SUREJEATH! 

ii D||U APU " G. N. MILCO'S California Universal 
DUn Hull; Insect Exterminator. Sure death 
to all Insects and harmless to human life A California 
production. Millions of people are enjoying its great 
usefulness. Directions with each package. Druggists 
and Grocers se 1 it at 25 cents, 50 cents, 75 cents, SI. 25 a 
can, and 6-pound cans at $4.50 per can. Never buy 
BUHACH in bulk, but In original cans, and see that they 
are sealed and covered by our trad -mark, as uiccess will 
not crown your efforts unless you use genuine BUHACH. 

Buhach Producing and M'f'g Co., 

Manufacturers, 
154 Levee Street, Stockton, Cal. 

and 49 Cedar Street, New York, N. Y. 

CONCRETE BUILDINGS. 

SILOS AND RESERVOIRS. 
R 1NSOMK. 102 Montgomery St., P. F. Send tor Circular. 



200 Acres in Close Cultivation ! 



J. LUSK & SON'S 



Oakland, Alameda County, Cal. 



1,000,000 NON-IRRIGATED FRUIT TREES 



FOR THE SEASON OF 1884-85. 



Embracing all the Leading Varieties of Apple, Pear, Peach, Plum, Prune, Apricots, Nectarines and Cherries 
Also tne Largest and Most Complete Assortment of 

3\TE3^\7\T JS^NJD RARE FRUITS 

On the Pacific Coast, including many California productions of great promise. 



KELSEY'S JAPAN PLUM, 

THE NOVELTY OF THE SEASON. 




THE LARGEST AND MOST VALUABLE OF ALL PLUMS. 



The Greatest Plum for Shipping Long Distances, 

Remaining Solid Longer than any other. 
Ripens in September. The Earliest in Bearing. 

The Largest Fruit. The Smallest Pit. 

The Finest Quality. The Best Shipper. 

The Most Attractive. A Regular Bearer. 
ONE OF THE MOST PRODUCTIVE. 

A valuable acquisition to our list of Eastern Shipping Fruits, possessing all the merits of our best Plums, with 
added firmness and brightness of color: hence, with its immense size, it is the most profitable for market, and the 
most desirable for general use of all Plums. 



Headquarters for the 

BERKELEY, NEW WHITE, FRENCH, AND ENGLISH 



LARGE STOCK OF 



SHADE and ORNAMENTAL TREES, 

EVERGREENS, SHRUBS, ROSES, 

Clematis and Flowering Plants, Small Fruits, Grapevines, Etc. 

Our Trees are grown on New Ground without Irrigation, and are 
FREE FROM ALL INSECTS and DISEASE. 

O" Before Purchasing elsewhere, people Intending to plant Trees will And It to their 
interest to come and see our Stock and learn our Prices. 

NURSERIES AND RESIDENCE— NORTH TEMESCAL. 

The University and Telegraph Avenue Street Cars Stop at the Nurseries, 
/t®- CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. Address all Communications to 
CATALOGUE for 1885-86 Free on Application. 

J. LUSK & SON, P. O. Box 9, North Temescal. 
Office at Nurseries, 45 h St. and Telegraph Ave-, Oakland, Cal. 



Dear Sir :— Having so many inquiries about prices ol 
Gates and County Rights, etc. , I herewith give prices of 
this celebrated Gate: 

For a Wood Frame Gate, Wire Rod $25 0) 

For a Wood Frame Gate, Wire Rod, Hog and Rab- 
bit tight 30 00 

For a Wiought Iron Plai i Gate 40 00 

Ff r a Wrought Iron Plain Gate, Hog and Rabbit 

tight 45 00 

For a Wrought Iron Plain Gate with fancy scroll 

on top 45 00 

For a Wrought Iron Frame, filled with Marsh Wire 50 00 
For a Wrought Iron Frame, filled with Marsh Wire, 

. with fancy scroll on top 60 00 

For a Tubular Iron Plain Gate 35 00 

ForaTubularlron Plain Gate, Hog and Rabbit tight 40 00 
For a Tulular Iron Plain Gate with fancy scroll on 

top 45 00 

For a Tubular Iron Frame, filled with Marsh Wire, 

with fancy scroll on top $50 00 to 60 00 

For Very Fancy Iron Gates from $60 00 to 100 00 

In asking for prices of County Rights, and discount to 
agents, etc., it is hard to make any fair impression on any 
person who has never seen the article they are inquiring 
about. Even if I quoted the largest discount given by 
any firm, or if I quuted the price of County Rights to you 
almost for nothing, yet any business man would not buy 
or handle any article before viewing it, and ascertain 
what it was. 

The question would naturally follow, "Will it pay to 
canvass for this; if it does, will it pay better to buy the 
territory in which he wishes to canvass in?" Those are 
questions any business man will ask himself before he 
embarks into any enterprise of this kind. And to place 
you on a fair basis, I will ship you a gate $5.00 less than 
the prices quoted. You put it up according to our direc- 
tions, and if the gate don't give satisfaction, send it back, 
freight paid, a d I will refund you the money, or you can 
deposit w ith Wells, Fariro & Co.'s express agent the price 
of the gate, less the $5.00, subject tomy order in ten days 
after receiving the gate. This will give you ample time 
to test the gate and see what it is. Should you return 
the gate, upon presenting the shipping receipt, freight 
paid, you can draw the amount from the agent with 
whom you deposited the money. I make this proposition 
because I know the gate will give the best of satisfaction, 
and I can show you figures whereby yon can make more 
money on the sale of this gate every year forfifteen years, 
than you can on the best 160 acres of land in your county. 
If you have any desire to enter into this business and buy 
County Rights, and thoroughly canvass, I will send you 
a confidential circular gi\ ing the bed-rork figures of the 
cost of these gates, which will show vou the large profit 
there is in them, and as to the sale of the gate, they are 
easily sold, more especially where they are introduced for 
any length of time, there is where they sell the fastest. 

For further particulars inquire of yours truly, 

JOHN AYLWARD, 
P. O. Box 88, Livermore, Alameda Co., Cal. 

XS"See my oth r advertisement in this paper. 



SQUIRREL and GOPHER 

EXTERMINATOR! 




This^Exterminator dispenses with all poi- 
sonous and dangerous preparations. 

THE MATERIAL USED COSTS NOTHING. 

For particulars, send for Illustrated Circular with 
Testimonials. Address: 

JOHN TAYLOR, or F. E. BROWNE 

44 So. Spting Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

EIFt-TIEIli'S 

IMPROVED HAY PRESSES. 




Bale Ten Tons of Hay a Day. 
Ten Tons to the Car. 



GEO. ERTEL & CO., 

Quincy, Ills., U. S. A. 
N B. —Any horse power hay press, whatever its name 
may be, is invited to be worked against an Ertel press, 
for an amount of from $500 to $1,000 a side, the press do- 
ing the most work (10 tons to the car) with the 'cast 
expense to take the money. — G. E. & <.o. £..■») 



12 



fACIFie RURAL, press 



[Jdly 4, 1885 



Lapds ht Sale and Jo Let. 



A BARGAIN. 



WE OFFER FOR SALE 80, 160 or 320 acres of Choice 
Land. Soil rich chocolate colored gravelly loam; all 
cultivated, located in the foothill*, -outh of and over- 
looking the town of Livermore. Will sell cheap t>> 
an immediate purchaser. Apply to or address 

McAFEE BROS., Land Agents, 
234 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

FRESNO COUNTY REAL ESTATE. 

SEEK A HOME in one of the best agricultural 
regions of the I'a ific Coast Fresno Comity, in the 
famous San Joaquin Valley, trie acknowledged fruit and 
vine-growi'ig region oT i antenna 

I AH dl in all sized Met*. Water, for irrigation, in 
abundance. Colony system gi eat buc-ess. Address 
S. N. GRIFFITH. 

Fresno City, Cal. 



2,506^ ACRES OF GOOD LAND. 

One-third Farming Land, balance good Vine, Fruit and 
Pasture Lands, in Mon«erey County, 40 miles S. W. from 
Sole ad; pait of the Milpitas Ranch. A living stream 
runs two miles through the land, and several fine springs. 
Jolon staae station is on the ranch. Price, S10 per acre. 
Terms, j cish, balance in one year at 7 per cent. For 
further particulars app'v to 

T. ELLSWORTH. 
22 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



30,000 ACRES TO LEASE FOR 

1 to 7 Years. 

Splendid grazing Lands, of which 1,500 acres are good 
agricultural lands, bting a portion of the Milpitas Ranch, 
Monterey County, watered by the San Antonio River, 
also by Mission Creek and scleral never-failing springs, 
w ell Umbered and on the stage road. Climate delightful; 
l!i cents per acre. For further particulars apply to 
T. ELLSWORTH, 
22 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

LAND FOR SALE. 

Five Hundred and T.venty five (525) acres. 5 miles of Fel- 
ton Depot, 8. P. C. R. R., Si>uta Cruz Co., on Ben Lomond 
Mountain ; 2 commodious dwelling-houses, 2 barns, out- 
houses, blacksmithshop, poultry-yard, 20 acies fruit-treer. 
beariug, 20 acres viuey-ird, 80 acres open fanning land, bal- 
ance heavy timber, r dwood, oak, et . Abundant nun of 
water; tine water in bouse from reservoir. A good mill site. 
$80 per acre. Terms liberal. 

P. PETERSON, Santa Cruz, Cal. 



In 12 Best Californian Counties. 



For descriptive price list of desirable Ranches, Farms, 
Vineyards and Californian Real Estate generally, apply 
to 

HENRY MKYRICK, Real Estate Kzchange and Mart. 
Sa nt a Crui, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR. 

1885. 

At Sacramento, September 7th to 19th, 
Two Weeks. 

The attention of the farming community of this State is 
particularly called to the lib ral awards offered for 

County Exhibits. 

The encouragement the Board met with in their first 
effort to establish a depattluent of this character, has in- 
duced them ti> iucre se the amount of premiums this year. 
The exhibits made in tin department at the last State Fair, 
were forwarded to New Orleans, and formed a greater part 
of Californi it exhibit at the World's Fair of 1881-5, w here 
they created a'l iuterest. and at the same time presented the 
practical results of farming in California. The object of the 
Hoard in offering these inducements, i-i to bring directly to 
the noti e of the world the superior lolvantages attaiued by 
California in farm products The tide of InUBlgnttoa DM 
turned this way. Those seeking homes among us are anx- 
ious to obtain a i much i formation as possible as to th? 
yield of various prodwts in diff rent localities, etc. No 
lietter method of showing the different resources of each 
county could lie devised T • this en 1 • he Boar 1 has offered 
i tin- most Ksienlre, Perfect, and Varied 

» vliil.it <>f I'arra I'loil ik-Ih i-\c u*ive of live stockl 

exhibited mm a Count] Production, the sum 
of 81. SOB. divided aa follow*: 

For the Best Display $500 00 

The remaining one t ousaud dollars will he distributed 
among the other count ; es in equitable proportion, consider- 
ing the merits of each coun'y exhibit 

Com etition to be between counties only. That is to say, 
that the entire exhibit made by one county must com- 
pete AOAINsT the entire EX II hut of another county. The 
premium awarded to each county exhibit will be paid to the 
committee iu charge of said exhibit. 

The State Board of Agriculture earnestly desires the 
hearty co-operation of the various subordinate Granges 
throughout the State, in making this exhibition of Cali- 
fornia s products a success, whereby the varied products of 
difl. rent localities may be fully shown. We would ask the 
appointment of a committee from the Grange In each 
county to call upon ar,d urge the Patrons to make a display 
representing their respective counties 

CsTSeku for Premium List 

..,,.„,„. _„ Im „ -IrHSE D.CARR. President. 
EDWIN F. SMITH, Secretary'. 



AMERICAN FRUIT EVAPORATOR. 




SCIENTIFIC IN STRUtTl-RE. A PRACTICAL SUC- 
_ ce«s. World-wide in us\ Easy and Economical to 
operate. S|c.ially suited for curing without sulphur. 
Highest merit and lowest price ever offered on the Coast 
Illustrated Manual free. Made bv Americas Mani fact- 
i rino Compact, Waynesboro, Pa. 

H. C. BRISTOL, Gen'l Agent. 
319 &321 Market St (Frank Bros.) San Francisco. 



Splendid ! —Latest Style chromo cards, name, 10c Pre- 
mium with 8 packs. F. H. PARDEE. New Haven.Ct. 




AUSTIN BROTHERS, 



IMPORTERS i>F. 



Hardware, Iron, Steel, 

Blacksmith Tools and Supplies, 

PUMPS, PIPE, Etc. 

310 and 312 MAIN STREET, - - - STOCKTON, CAL. 




PATENT 

LIFE-SAVING RESPIRATOR 

Entirely Prevents Lead Poisoning 
and Salivation 

Tl e most perfect appliance for people engaged in 
Smelting. l»ry ('mailing, Guano Works 
Ouicksilver Mines, I > ... I Corroding, and all 

other occupations where there is dust, poisonous vapor, 
or bad odor. 

In l->e<linfr Th resiling Machines, and simi 
lar work, they are indispensable, as no foreign substances 
can be inhaled when they are worn. 

The Respirators arc sold subject 'o approval after trial 
ami if not satisfactory the price will be refunded. Trice, 
«i 00 each or $30.00 per dozen. Sent post-paid to any 
address on receipt of price. 

Address communications and orders to 

T. E JEWELL. Sole Agent, 
330 Pine St (Room ."■) San Francisco. 

tSTSend for Descriptive Circulars eontaiirng Testi 
nionials of well known j arties who are at present us'ng 
tlieni . 



ESTABLISHED 1852. 



WILLIAM P. MILLER 

Stocltton, Cal., 




Carriage Manufacturer. 

Make to order and always have on hand a good assortment to select from. Make the Cele- 
brated DEXTER SPRING BUGGY, Several Styles of CARTS. Also sell: 

HARNESS, WHIPS, ROBES, 

And CARRIAGE MATERIALS, WHEELS, Etc. 

jySend for Catalogue and Prices. "Si 



CHEAP LANDS FOR SALE IN SAN LUIS OBISPO CO. 

575 Acres of Choice Fruit Land 

Wiihin six miles of the celebrated Paso Roblcs mineral springs and near the proposed railroad from San Francisco 
and San Luis Obispo. About one-fourth is valley, balance rolling laud. No irrigation needed, as the rainfall is 
sufficient. No better climate in the State; being 20 miles from the Coast, is free from the cold fogs and bleak winds 
which prevail near the coast, and of the intense heat of the interior valleys. Price, $10 per acre. Hern is an op- 
I ortnnity to buy ten acre* of Uud for the price asked for one acre in Santa Clara valley, with a better soil and better 
climate than can be found in Santa ( lira or Napa valleys. 

Adjoining the abive I have a stock ranch of 1,400 acres, covered with bunch grass and alflliera, the most 
nutritious of all native grasses. On the bottom land is clover and blue-joint grasses. A stream, with running water 
the year round, passes through it. Plenty of oak trees on both of the pieces for fence posts and fuel. Price, 88 per 
acre. Part of the purchase nionev can remain for two and three y ears. 

AMOS ADAMS, 110 Ninth Street, San Francisco 



CRYSTAL SPRINGS. 



This Dksirabi.k 

Summer Resort and Sanitarium, 

Situated on Howell Mountain, 2i 
miles N. W. of St. Helena, 
IS OPEN 

To those seeking health, or rest and recreation. Scenery 
is unsurpassed. Air balmy, free from fogs and malaria. 
Water pure and soft, from a fine spring. Bathing facili- 
ties first-class. Good Gymnasium. Carriage and horse- 
back riding. An experienced physician and surgeon, 
w ith gentlemen and lady assistants, will attend £.11 cases 
needing his caie. Excellent facilities for treatment. 
Terms reasonable. Send for Circular or "Come and see " 
Address RURAL HEALTH RETREAT. 

St. Helena, Cal. 



E. H TUCKER. 



Land Broker, 

MAIN STREET, 

Selma, Fresno Co., - California. 



OLIVES! OLIVES! 

I wish either to go in with some one, or form a com- 
pany to plant Oliies extensively. 
I have many thousand fine two-year-old trees. 

W. A. HAYNE, JR., 

Santa Barbara, Cal. 



tdlicatiopal. 



NAPA COLLEGE, 

NAPA CITY, CAL. 

The Fall Session Will Open 
JULY 29, 1885. 

238 STUDENTS LAST YEAR. 
Faculty Consists of 12 Members. 

OPEN TO BOTH SEXES 

With Classical, Philosophical, and Scientific courses lead- 
ing to the degrees of A. B., B Ph., and B. S. 
Thorough course in Musi •, Art, and Elocution. 
The several Departments are in charge of teachers of 

experience and ability, chosen with sj ecial reference to 

their work. 

The Commercial Department is well provided with 
facilities for acquiring a Thoroi on Practical Hi sinehs 
Education. 

Delightful climate, pleasant surroundings, with home 
on grounds where parents may know that their «ons and 
daughters are carefully guarded, and under the direct 
supervision of the faculty. 

fSTFi I Catalogue or iufoimatiou address 

A. E. LASHER, President 

CALIFORNIA MILITARY ACADEMY. 

OAKLAND, CAL. 




Term begins JMonday. JULY 20. 1885. 

COL. W. H. O'BRIEN, Principal. 




TRINITY SCHOOL-CHURCH. BOARDING AND 
Day School for Young Men and Boys, 1534 Mission 
St , San Francisco. Prepares for College and University. 
Christmas Session opens I hursday, July IS, UH Refers 
to— Win. K. Bibcock, Esq., CoL K. E. Eyre, Jos ph 
Powning, F?q , Gen. L. H Allen, Win. T. Coleman, Esq., 
Geo W. Gihbs, Esq. For information, add ess, REV. E. 
B. SPALDING, Rector. 



HOPKINS ACADEMY. 

OAKLAND, OAL. 

Rev. H. E. JEWETT, Principal. 

NEXT TERM 

Begins Tuesday, July 28, 1885. 

aVTSEND FOR CATALOGUE. H 



THE HARMON SEMINARY, 

Berkeley, cal. 

A BOABDINO AND DAY SCHOOL FOB 
YOUNG LADIES. 

Pupils taken at any time. 
For Catalogue or other informat on, address : 

THE MISSES HARMON, Berkeley, Cal. 

Or E. J. WICKSON, 414 Clay St., S. F. 

SACKETT SCHOOL. 

English, Classical and Commercial Courses 
of Study. 

STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS In all Respects. 

The next School Year will begin Monday, Jaly 20, 
1885. Send address, for Catalogue, to 

D. P. SACKETT, A. M., Principal, 

529 Hobart St., Oakland, Cal. 



BOWENS ACADEMY, 

University Avenue, - Berkeley, Cal. 

Prepiratory, Commercial, and 
Academic Departments- 

NKXT TERM BKGIN8 

Monday. July 20, 1885 Send for Circulars to 

T. STEWART BOWENS, B. A., T. C. D., Princi|«l. 



mm 



BUSINESS 

OOLLECE, 

24 Post St. S. F. 

Ijeod for Circular. 



July 4, 1885.] 



13 



3 



NTOMOLOGIGAb. 



A Satisfactory Grasshopper Killer. 

D. W. Coquillet, who is studying our locusts 
in the employ of the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, sends the following valuable notes to 
the Sacramento Bee: Among the numerous 
remedies for the destruction of grasshoppers 
which I have tried or seen tried, only one gives 
promise of accomplishing anything like satisfac- 
tory results. It consists of a mash composed 
of bran, arsenic, sugar and water, the propor- 
tions being one part of sugar, one and one half 
parts of arsenic and four parts of bran, to which 
is added a sufficient quantity of water to make 
a wet mash. A common washtubful of this 
mash is sufficient for about five acres of grape 
vines. Fill the washtub about three-fourths 
full of bran, add six pounds of arsenic, and mix 
it thoroughly with the bran; put about four 
pounds of coarse brown sugar in a pail, fill the 
pail with water and stir until the greater part 
of the sugar is dissolved. Then pour this sugar- 
water into the bran and arsenic, and again fill 
the pail with water and proceed as before until 
all of the sugar in the pail has bean dissolved 
and added to the bran. Now stir the latter 
thoroughly and add as much water as is neces- 
sary to thoroughly saturate the mixture, and it 
is ready for use. 

Throw about a tablespoonful of this mixture 
upon the ground beneath each vine infested 
with grasshoppers; and in a short time the lat- 
ter will leave the vine and collect upon the 
bran and soon commence feeding upon it. 
Those which are upon the ground six or eight 
feet from the bran will soon find their way to 
it, apparently guided by the sense of smell, as 
those to the leeward of the bran have been ob- 
served to come to it from a greater distance 
than those which were upon the side of the 
bran from which the wind was blowing. After 
eating as much of the bran as they desire, the 
grasshoppers usually crawl off, and many hide 
themselves beneath weeds, clods of earth, e c, 
and in a few hours will be found to be dead. 

The mixture cobts from 35 to 40 cents per 
acre of vineyard, including labor of mixing 
and applying it. In orchards the cost will be 
considerably less than this. One man can ap- 
ply it to eight or ten acres of vineyard in a 
day. 

I have seen this remedy tried on an extensive 
scale at the vineyard and orchard of Messrs. 
Kohler, West and Minturn, at Minturn sta- 
tion, Fresno county. In that part of the vine- 
yard which was the most thickly infested by 
grasshoppers from 30 to 50 dead grasshoppers 
were found beneath almost every vine, while 
beneath the adjacent weeds were hundreds of 
others, the greater part dead. It was also 
very effectual when placed beneath small fruit 
trees, the grasshoppers leaving the trees to feed 
upon this mixture. 

The addition of sugar to this mixture is 
merely to cause the arsenic to adhere to the 
particles of bran, and not for the purpose of in 
creasing its attractiveness, since it was found 
that the grasshoppers were not attracted to 
pure sugar. Middlings or shorts have been used 
in the place of bran, but are not so desirable, 
since in drying they assume a solid mass which 
the grasshoppers cannot eat, whereas bran in 
drying never assumes a solid form. — D. W. 
Coquillet, Alwaler, Merced Co., June :'7th. 

The Phylloxera in France. 

Mr. Tisseraud, Director of the Board of Ag- 
riculture in France, has presented his annual 
report to the Committee on Phylloxera in 
France for the year 1884. There is a decrease 
of the disease, though it has not been as rapid 
as expected and wished for. The phylloxera 
appeared only slightly in Loire, Inferieure, 
Loir et Cher, Savoy, Saone, Jura and Vandee 
Departments. It has been checked in ita pro- 
gress. Up to this epoch the loss of French 
vineyards was one million hectares, viz.,, 993,- 
104 hectares in twenty -eight departments which 
have received permission to plant American 
vines and 7,515 in the twenty-six departments 
which have been invaded by the phylloxera for 
the past six years. But 600,000 hectares, 
which have been treated, have been recon- 
quered from the phylloxera. The surface of 
vineyards before the spread of the phylloxera 
was 2,485,829 hectares; it is now of 2,056,713 
— therefore the lotal loss has been to the pres- 
ent year of 420,000 hectares. Therefore we 
must continue to fight it, as there is already a 
good victory. 

Studying Our Insects. 

We received a call the other day from Albert 
Koebele, of Washington, who is authorized by 
Prof. C. V. Riley, U. S. Entomologist, to make 
collections and studies of various insects which 
are now prominent in our agriculture and horti- 
culture. Mr. Koebele started out first to at- 
tack the grasshopper, or rather the several par- 
asites which are making life a burden to that 
pestiferous animal. He went first to the Fol- 
som neighborhood. 

Arsenic for Grasshoppers. 

El-itors Press: — I notice a correspondent 
from Vacaville in the last Rural Press recom- 
mends Paris green for the destruction of grass- 
hoppers. One pound of white arsenic prepared 
and applied as he describes will go farther in 
destroying these pests than five pounds of Paris 
green, and will not cost one-tenth as much. I 



have used large quantities of arsenic for the de- 
struction of the potato bug at the East, with 
the best of results. Where Paris green and 
London purple cost from 40 to 60 cents a 
pound, I could purchase arsenic at from 15 
to 20 cents a pound, and one pound of arsenic 
would go farther than five pounds of the other 
articles named. When using it the water 
should be frequently stirred, as it is not readily 
dissolved. — J. S. Tibeits, Santa Rita. 



The First Hall of Congress. 

The old State House at Philadelphia, where 
the Declaration of Independence was adopted is 
entitled to all the glory which it receives, but 
there are other buildings which are remembered 
as the lodging place of events which led up to 
the grand event of July 4, 1776. One of these 
is shown in the engraving on this page and 
known as "Carpenters' Hall" in Philadelphia. 
In this building assembled the "First Conti- 
nental Congress," on the 5th day of September, 
1774. Under its roof met Peyton Randolph, 
Samuel and John Adams, Roger Sherman, Pat- 
rick Henry, Richard Henry Lee, Christopher 
Gadsden, the Rutledges and our own John 
Dickinson. George Washington, too, was a 
member of this Congress. Within its walls are 
the relics of a hundred years. Here and there 
are faces dear to every American heart. Over 
the platform, where sat and so ably presided 




Assembly Hall of the First Continental 
Convention. 

the zealous Peyton Randolph, are painted these 
words: "Within these walls, Henry, Hancock 
and Adams inspired the delegates of the Colo- 
nies with nerve and sinew for the toils of war." 
At the east end of the hall hangs an engraving 
representing the "First Prayer in Congress." 
It was in this hall Washington was kneeling, 
and Randolph, Henry and Rutledge and the 
Puritan Patriots stood, bowed with reverence, 
as Rev. Dr. Duche prayed. 



A B C of Carp Culture. —From time to 
time we have been in receipt of letters from 
subscribers asking for information about the 
German food carp, the construction of ponds, 
and the best method of raising this class of the 
finny tribe. As the climate of this State is ad- 
mirably suited to the successful propagation and 
cultivation of the German carp we have spared 
no pains to secure and lay before our readers 
all the available information bearing on the 
subject we could obtain. Many have desired 
some handy and comprehensive manual treat- 
ing on carp culture, but such a work was not 
to be had. Such a book has just been pub- 
lished by Mr. A. J. Root. It contains 100 
pages in pamphlet form and has a copious in- 
dex, which will be found of great help to the 
reader. The author is Capt. Milton P. Pierce, 
secretary of the American Carp Cultural Asso- 
ciation. In looking over its pages we have 
found it a complete treatise in regard to the 
subject upon which it treats, and contains plans 
and instructions for the construction of ponds, 
and in fact everything pertaining to the raising 
of carp for food. Some 20 engravings illustrate 
its pages. We can ^furnish it to our readers, 
postage free, for 50 cents a copy. Address 
Dewey & Co., Publishers, S. F. 



Forest Preservation. 

A few weeks ago we published an open letter 
addressed to Congressman-elect H. H. Mark- 
ham, by Abbot Kinney, relating to the impera- 
tive needs of some general measures for forest 
propagation and protection in this country. 
Mr. Kinney has addressed his appeal in the 
right direction, for Col. Markham announces 
himself prepared to urge the proposed measure. 
From a reply to Mr. Kinney, which was pub- 
lished in the Pasadena ValUy Union, we quote 
as follows: 

Your interesting letter of May is now before 
me. The subject therein discussed, to wit: 
"Destruction of our Forests," is one demanding 
the early attention of our government. I am 
in full sympathy with you in the matter, and 
most gladly tender to you my earnest efforts in 
accomplishing the object therein sought. * * * 
I was born, reared, and have always lived in a 
timber country, and have watched the effect 
of timber upon natural water-courses, and I am 
thereby fortified in my belief that your position 
is correct. My brother owns a farm in Sheboy- 
gan county, Wisconsin, a county heavily tim- 
bered. He built a shingle mill on the creek 
passing through his farm and ran it by water 
power, but as the land surrounding him became 
shorn of its timber and cultivated, the stream 
diminished and soon became dry. He sold and 
purchased another tract in the next county 
north, and when I first saw it in 1861, there 
was a stream running through it containing 
sufficient water to allow him and others to float 
double length railroad ties by the hundreds 
down it to the market. The surrounding coun- 
try was rapidly cleared, and within six years 
the stream became dry, with no water except 
in rainy seasons. I will not take the time to 
repeat many other instances of a like na ure. 

I wish your letter might be extensively cir- 
culated. I believe it would have a beneficial 
effect upon those who consider our timber lands 
of little value except for wood and timber. As 
you have so ably commenced the good work, I 
would suggest that you follow it up by furnish- 
ing me with the draft of a bill embracing what 
you would deem sufficient to cover the points 
sought to be accomplished. 

The Coming Fairs. 

We give below a partial list of this year's 
fairs on this coast. We shall print the list from 
time to time with such corrections and addi- 
tions as may come to our notice. We trust the 
officers of all fairs, whether district, county or 
town, will inform us at once of locations and 
dates of their exhibitions: 

Bay District Association, San Francisco, August 
ist, 4th, 6th, 7th and 8th. 

Sonoma County Agricultural Park Association, 
Santa Rosa, August 17th to 22d. 

Sonoma and Marin District Fair, Petaluma, Au- 
gust 24th to 291I1. 

Mechanics' Institute Fair, San Francisco, will open 
August 25th. 

Petaluma Fair, August 25th to 29th. 

Golden Gate Fair, Oakland, August 31st to Sep- 
tember 5th. 

Seventeenth Agricultural District — Nevada and 
Placer counties, Glenbrook Rice Track, September 
ist to 5th. 

State Agricultural Society, Sacramento, September 
7th to 19th, 

Stockton Fair, September 22d to 26th. 

San Jose Fair, September 28th to October 3d. 

Mt. Shasta District Fair at , September 

-30th to October 3d. 

Nevada State Fair, Reno, October i2t)^ to 17th. . 

Pacific Coast Blood Horse Association races in 
November. 

A Precocious Jersey.— H. B. Berryman has 
upon his fine estate of North Berkeley, Alameda 
county, a nice band of registered Jerseys. One 
of the young things has exhibited rather excep- 
tional precocity. Belle of Berkeley was dropped 
June 10, 1884, dam Una of Yerba Buena. On 
June 17, 1885, Belle of Berkeley dropped her 
first calf, a vigorous young heifer. This deed 
makes her a mother at one year and seven days 
old. We are quite accustomed to early matur 
ity in this climate, but this is the youngest ma- 
ternity we have heard of. What is the observa 
tion of others? 



List of D. S. Patents lor Pacific Co 
Inventors. 

From the official list of U. S. Patents In Dewky & Co.'s 
Scibntific Press Patent Agency, 252 Market St., S. F. 

for week ending june 23, 1885. 

320.531. — Machine for Straightening Round 
Bars — Beauregard & Wheelock, S. F. 

320.532. — Liquid Fuel Apparatus— J. D. Bod- 
well, S. F. 

3 2 °. 533-— Liquid Fuel Apparatus— J. D. Bod- 
well, S. F. 

320,845.— Guide for Sawing Stair Rails — S. 
Burnell, Anacortes, W. T. 

320,463.— Egg Turning Device for Incuba- 
tors— L. Cutting, S. F. 

320,646. — Horse Collar Fastening — Fisher 
& Burgess, Sacramento, Cal. 

320,559. — Rock Crusher — C. W. Huson, Wea- 
verville, Cal. 

320,473. — Guide for Cultivators — S. P. 
Hutchinson, Saratoga, Cal. 

320,565.— Amalgamator — W. E. Koch, Souls- 
byville, Cal. 

320,569.— Pad Buckle and Trace Carrier — 
O. Mallory, Auburn, Cal. 

320,489.— Hose Carriage — S. R. McLaughlin, 
S. F. 

320,580. — Fruit Jar — C. Newman, S. F. 

320 586. — Cupola Furnace— E. Probert, S. F. 

Note.— Copies of TJ. S. and Foreign patents furnished 
by Dewey & Co., in the shortest time possible (by tele- 
graph or otherwise), at the lowest rates. American and 
Foreign patents obtained, and all patent business for 
Pacific Coast inventors transacted with perfect security 
and in the shortest possible time. 

Poland-Chinas. — John Gilmore, of Vinton, 
Iowa, secretary of the American Poland-China 
Record Co., announces that the American 
Poland-China Record, Vol. 6, will be ready by 
July 15th. The book is much larger than any 
heretofore published. The volume contains 
over 3,000 pedigrees, nearly 800 hundred pages 
with four pedigrees on each page; printed on 
heavy paper and bound same as the former 
volumes, only stronger, having leather back. 
The price of sixth volume is $4 net, 25 cents 
extra for carriage; or full set of six volumes to 
one address, $20, postpaid. There is now on 
file about 2,000 pedigrees for Vol. 7, and 
breeders are requested to send pedigrees in 
promptly so as to avoid the rush and many 
mistakes that would not occur if pedigrees 
were sent in time to have them properly looked 
over before the book closes. 

Los Angeles is to hold a special election to 
determine whether the city shall issue #245,000 
for improvement purposes. 



A VALUABLE REMEDY. 

The attention of our readers is called to Burnham's 
Abictene, which is an extract of a peculiar kind of Fir 
Balsam, which grows in a certain locality in the Sierras 
of California. It possesses remarkable curative proper- 
ties for many ills of the flesh that the human family is 
heir to. It is used both internally and externally, as a 
Liniment for the relief of Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Bruises, 
Sprains, Fresh Wounds, Headaches, etc., it has no supe- 
rior. Internally for Coughs, Colds, Sore Throat. Croup, 
Kidney Troubles, etc. Its effect in Croup is remarkable, 
and is considered quite a specific for it. Those who are 
aware of its merits are never without it, and look upon it 
as one of nature's remedies. It should he in every house- 
hold. Sells for 60 cents and 81 per bottle. Sold by all 
wholesale dealers in San Francisco and by dealers gener- 
ally. For Testimonials of its merits address W. M. 
HICKMAN, Druggist, Stockton, Cal. 



There is a war in lumber rates at Santa Cruz, 
and redwood is retailed at $11 per M. 



A Good Promise. — We notice that a Napa 
lawyer in his card in the Register says that he 
"will practice civilly." This assurance must be 
very pleasant to client, judge and jury, in view 
of the fact that lawyers sometimes have to be 
examined for concealed weapons before entering 
court. The same promise would also be accept- 
able from men in all kinds of business. 



Vineyard Laborers who understand their business, 
also Farmers, Teamsters, Carpenters, and others, fur- 
nished quickly by sending your orders to .1. F. CROSKTT 
& CO., 628 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 



At a preliminary meeting of the fruit-grow- 
ers' organization at Sacramento on Sunday, Asa 
Lowe was elected chairman and Mr. Ogden sec- 
retary. The general opinion among those pres- 
ent seemed to be that prices are now too low, 
and that the only remedy is for fruit-growers to 
combine and become shippers themselves, in- 
stead of Belling to middlemen or commission 
merchants. 



IS 



THE 



WORTHY 

Of Confidence. 

* yCD'C Sarsaparilla is a medicine that, 
M T Cat o during nearly 40 years, in all 
parts of the world, has proved Its effi- 
cacy as flic best blood alterative known 
to medical science. 

SARSAPARILLA ffiSSKFSS 

genuine Honduras Sarsaparilla) is its 
base, and its powers are enhanced by 
the extracts of Yellow Dock and Stii- 
lingia, the Iodides of rotassium and 
Iron, and other potent ingredients, 
your blood vitiated by derangements 
of the digestive and iissiinilatory func- 
tions? is it tainted by Scrofula? or 
does it contain the poison of Mercury 
or Contagious Disease'/ 

leading physicians of the United 
States, who know the composition 
of Ayer's Sarsaparilla, say that 
nothing else so good for the purifica- 
tion of the blood is within the range of 
pharmacy. 

ami w by "the use of this remedy is it 
UNLY possible for a person who has 
corrupted blood to attain sound health 
and prevent transmission of the de- 
structive taint lo posterity. 
TUODfllirUI V effective renovation 
InUnUUbrlLT oft he system must 
include not only the removal of cor- 
ruption from the blood, but its enrich- 
ment and the strengthening of the 
vital organs, 
rjri i Am r witnesses, all over the 
KLLIADLC. world, testifv that this 
work is better accomplished by Ayer's 
Sarsaparilla than by any other 
remedy. 

Dl nnn " Iat is corrupted through dis- 
bLUUU ease is made pure, and blood 
weakened through diminution of the 
red corpuscles is made strong, by 
Ayer'S Sarsaparilla. 

DIIDirx/IMP 1,1 1 •'""' building 

rUnlrYIPIU up the system require 
time in serious cases, but benefit will 
he derived from .the use of Ayer's 
SaksapaRIXLA moro speedily than 
from anything else. 
urniPIMC for which like effects are 
WILL) lb! lit. falsely claimed, is abun- 
dant in the markel , under many names, 
but the only preparation that has stood 
the test of time, and proved worthy of 
the world's confidence, i^ 

Ayer's Sarsaparilla, 

PREPARED by 

Dr. J. C. Ayer &. Co., Lowell, Mass- 
Sold by all Druggists: Price $1; 
Six bottles for $5. 



14 



pACIFie RURAL, p RESS. 



[Joly 4, 1885 



breeders' tlireclory. 



bi\ linen or less In this Directory at 50c. a line per month 



POULTRY. 

MRS D. C VESTAL. San Jose. Brown Leghorns, 
Langshans and Plymouth Rocks. Eggs and Fowls. 



CALI FORNIA POULTRY FARM. Stockton, Cal. 
Innwrters and breeders of Thoroughbred Poultry. Eggs 
and chicks for sale. Cutting & Kobinson, P. O. Box 7. 



R. G. HEAD, Napa, Cal , breeder of high-class Land 
and Water Fowls and Berkshire Pigs, Brahma', Cochins, 
I.augshans, Plymouth Kocks, Leghorns, Geese, Ducks, 
Turkeys. Send Scent stamp for Circular. 



A PROVO KLUIT, Kruitvale avenue. Alameda Co., 
(M., P. O. Box '-'IS, Oakland, breeder and importer of 
line Thoroughbred Poultry. Circular free. 



O. J. ALB BE, Santa Clara, Cal., breeder of Lang- 
shans, Partridge Cochins, Pedigreed Scotch Collies, 
White Crested Black Polish, Wyandottes, Brown Leg- 
horns, and Black B. K. Came Bantams. 



D. H. EVERETT, 1616 Larkin St., San Francisco, 
breeder of Langshans exclusively. Eggs and fowls. 



MRS. J. H. SMYTH, Oil Montgomery St., San Fran- 
Cisco. Thoroughbred Langshans; Kggs jiuo per 13. 

C. H- NE4L, Lodi, San Joaquin Co., importer and 
breeder of Thoroughbred Poultry for 20 years. Has 
all the leading varieties anil birds of all classes for sale, 
aa well as Eggs for hatching . 

W- C DAMON, Napa, White and Brown Leghorns, 
B. Spanish, P. Rocks, Light Brahinas, Langshans, Pe- 
kin Ducks; eggs 10 cts.; fowls each. Circulars 
free. 



MRS. L. J. W ATKINS, San Jose, Cal. Pure bred 
Fancy Poultry. White and Brown Leghorns, Plymouth 
Rocks, Langshans, Uoudans, Light Brahmas, and 
Black Spanish. Kggs and Fowls 



AXFORD'S IMPROVED INCUBATOR. For 
further information address I. P. Clarke, Mayfleld, Cal. 

MRS. M. E. NEWHALL, San Jose. White and 
Brown Leghorns, Langshans, Plymouth Rocks, Light 
Brahmas, Pekin Ducks anil Bronze Turkeys. 



SMITH'S POULTRY YARDS, Blanding avenue, 
Alameda, Cal. All the leading varieties of Thorough- 
bred Fowls, and Eggs tor hatching. Also the Alameda 
Brooder and agent for the Relief Incubators. Address, 
Chas. W. Smith, P. U. Box 57, Oakland, Cal. 



GEO. B. BAYLEY, 1317 Castro St., Oakland, Im- 
porter and Breeder of all the best known and most 
profitable Land and Water Fowls. Publisher of the 
Pacific Coast Poulterers' Hand Book and Guide. Price 
40 cents. Send 2-cent stamp for Illustrated Circular. 



D. D. BRIGGS, Los Gatos, Cal., importer and breeder 
of Langshans, W. F. Bl. Spanish, Bl. Hamburgs, Ply- 
mouth Rocks, Black Japan Bantams, Golden Spangled 
Poland's, Pekin Ducks. Circulars free. 

T. D MORRIS, Sonoma, Cal. Tuolouse and Embden 
Geese, Bronze and W. Holland Turkeys, and all leading 
varieties of Thoroughbred Poultry. 



HORSES AND CATTLE. 



COTATE RANCH BREEDING FARM, Page's 
Station, S. F. & N. P. R. R. P. 0., Pcnn'B Grove, 
Sonoma Co., Cal. Wilfred Page, Manager Breeders 
of Short Horn Cattle, English Draft Horses, Spanish Me- 
rino Sheep and Berkshire Swine. 

S. SCOTT, Cloverdale, Cal. , Importer and Breeder of 
high-breed Short Horn Cattle of the best milking quali 
ties. Imported Duke of Auckland (S3o)at head of herd. 
Jacks and Spanish Merino Sheep. All kinds of stock 
for sale. 

ROBERT BECK, San Francisco, Breeder of Regis- 
tered Thoroughbred Jerseys. 

MRS. M. E. BRADLEY, San Jose, Cal. Breedei 
of recorded thoroughbred Short Horn Cattle and Berk- 
shire Hogs. A ohoice lot of young stock for sale. 

PETER SAXE & SON, Lick House, San Francisco, 
Cal. Importers and Breeders, for past 14 years, of 
every variety of Cattle, Horses, Sheep and Hogs. 

J. A. BREWER, Centerville, Alameda Co., Cal. 
Short Horns and Grades. Correspondence solicited. 



GEORGE BEMENT, Re Jwood City, San Mateo Co., 
Cal. Breeder of Ayrshire Cattle, Southdown Sheep and 
Berkshire Hogs. All kinds of stock for sale. 



WILLIAM NILES. Los Angeles, Cal. Thorough- 
bred Poultry, Cattle and Hogs. Write for oircular. 



J. R. ROSE, Lakeville, Sonoma Co., Cal. Breeder 
of Thoroughbred Devons, Roadsters and Draft Horses. 



SWINE. 



WILLIAM NILES, Los Angeles, Cal. Thoroughbred 
Poland-China and Berkshire Pits. Circulars free. 

JOHN RIDER, Sacramento, Cal. Breeder of Thor- 
oughbred Berkshire Swine. My stock of Hogs are all 
reoorded in the American Berkshire Record. 

F. W. SCOFIELD, Santa Cruz, Cal., breeder of 
thoro ughbred Duroc Jersey Sw ine. Pigs for sale. 

TYLER BEACH, San Jose, Cal. Breeder of Thor 
outrhhred Berkshire 



SHEEP AND GOATS. 



L. U. SHIPPEE, Stockton, Cal. Importer and breeder 
of Spanish Merino Sheep, Durham Cattle, Red Duroc 
•*nrt Rerkahlre Swine HUrh erarieri Rams for aula 



JULIUS WEYAND, Breeder of pure-blooded An- 
gora Goats, Little Stony, Colusa Co., Cal. 



BEES. 



WM. MUTH-RASMUSSEN, Independence, Inyo 
County, Cal. , dealer in Honey, Comb Foundation, and 
Italian Queens in season. Bee-hive and frame ma- 
ter ial sawed to order. 

J. D. ENAS, Sunnyside, Napa, Cal., breeds Pure 
Italian yueens. No foul brood. Comb Foundation, 
Extractors, etc. "Cook's Manual of the Apiary." 



DOGS. 



CHARLES M. HAMMOND. Lakeport, Lake Co., 
Cal. Thoroughbreil Chesapeake Bay Duck Dogs for 
sale. Price, $5u.U0, when 3 mouths old. 



Houses ^nd G^jtle. 

FINE IMPORTED 

Pare Bred & High Grade Animals 

FOR SALE 

BY TUB 

PETALUMA STOCK BREEDERS' ASSOCIATION. 

location: 
PETALUMA, SONOMA CO., CAL., 

BOARD or directors: 
J. R. ROSE, THEO. SKILLMAN, E. DENMAN, 
ROBERT CRANE, J. H. WHITE. 

Everything Guaranteed aa Represented. 
Fine Breeding Animals a Specialty. 

HORSES: Draft, Carriage and Roadsters. 
CATTLE: Holstein, Devon, Jersey, Ayrshire and Short 
Horns. 

SHEEP: Merinos, Shropshires, Southdowns and others. 
SWINE: Berkshire, Duroc and Poland-China. 
POULTRY: All approved varieties. 

Call on or address .1. II. Mr N A HB, Ser'y, 

Module's Block, Petalunia. 



ONTARERANCHO. 

Imported French Coach Horses, 

CLYDESDALE HORSES, 

Trotting Bred Roadsters, 

AND 

IMPORTED 

HOLSTEIN CATTLE 

F. T. UNDERBILL, Proprietor. 

Address C. F- SWAN, 

Santa Barbara, Cal. 



BADEN FARM HERD. 
Of Short Horn Cattle and Dairy Cows. 

Catalogues and Prices on application to 

ROBERT ASHBURNER, 
Radon Station. ... Han Mateo On 




Importer and Breeder of choice Poultry — Langshans, 
Light Brahinas, Partridge Cochins, Plymouth Rocks. A 
trio of Langshans, imported direct from Croad's Yard, 
England. Eggs and young stock for sale. Send for far- 
ther information. 




CALI FOKNIAf POUL- 
TRY FARM. 

Headquarters for Thor- 
oughbred Poultry and Eggs 
Wc have all the leading and 
most profitable b reeds, 
thicks for delivery Sept. 1. 
1885. Agents for White 
Mountain Incubator. Send 
2o. stamp for price list. 

CUTTING a ROBINSON, 
P. O. Box 7, Stockton, Cal. 




D. H. EVERETT, 

1616 Larkin Street, 

San Francisco, 

BRBBDBR OP CR0AD STRAIN 



LANGSH AN S 

Exclusively. 

Eggs and Breeding Stock for 
Sale. Eggs, S3 for 13. 



EAGLE POULTRY FARM. 

Fruit Vale, Alameda County, Cal. 

RDUBERNET, BREEDER OF THO- 
• roughbred Fowls. Eggs and Fowls for sale. Brown 
and White Leghorns, SI per setting. Plymouth Rocks 
and Houdans, #1.60 per setting; White Face Black 
Spanish and Langshans, S*2 per setting; Pekin Ducks, $1 
per setting. Money to accompany order. Address, 

R. DUBERNET, 
P. O. Box 75. Brooklyn. Alameda Co.. Cal. 




TX7TANDOTTES, FLI- 
* » mouth Rocks, Light Brah 
nas, Langshans, Brown Leg- 
horns, B. B. R. Game Bantams, 
Pearl Guineas, Homer Antwerp 
'igeons. 

J. N. LUND, 

Cor. Piedmont Av. & Booth St., 
P. O. Box 110. 



HILLSIDE POULTRY FARM 

Headquarters for Pure Langshans — the 
Great Egg Producers. 
Early Chicks for sale— single pairs, trios or pens. 
Also, a few choice Light Brahmas and Plymouth Rocks. 
Stock large, strong and i igorous. Eggs that will hatch 
?::."" per 13. 

MRS. J. RAYNOR, 
Frultvale, Alameda Co., Cal. 
OVVisltors tako horse cars at East Oakland. 



>00 HEAD ON HANI). 



The Largest and Choicest Herd in this Country. 



Over thirty yearly records 
made in this herd average 
14,212 lbs. 5 ounces; average 
age of cows 4J years. 

In 1S81 our entire herd of 
mature cows averaged 14,164 
tbs. IS ounces. 

In 1S.S2 our entire herd of 
eight three-year-olds aver- 
aged 12,38s lbs. 9 ouuees. 

April 1, 18S4, ten cows in 
this herd had made records 
from 14,000 to 18,000 each, 
averaging 15,808 lbs. 6 3-10 
ounces. 




For the year ending June, 
1884, five mature cows aver- 
aged 16,621 lbs. 1 2-5 ounces. 

Seven heifers of the Ne- 
therland Family, five of them 
I years old and two 3 years 
old, averaged 11,556 lbs. 
1 2-5 ounces. 

BUTTER RECORDS: 

Nine cows averaged 17 lbs. 
6f ounces per week. 

Eight heifers, 3 years old, 
averaged 13 tbs. 4} ouuees 
per week. 



(BUTTER RECORDS CONTINUED.) Eleven heifers, two years old and younger, avenged 10 lbs. 3 
ounces per week. The entire original imported Netherland Family of six cows (two being but 3 years old) averaged 
17 lbs. 6 16 ounces per week. 

Every animal selected by a member of the firm In person. 

*"3rWhen writing always mention the Pacific Rural Prbbb. 

SMITHS, POWELL & LAMB. Lakeside Stock Farm, Syracuse, N. Y. 



LIVE STOCK SALT ROLLER. 




The Only Practical Salt-Feeding Device. 
Always Ready. Never Wasted. 
Cheapest in the End. 

There is nnthing more essential to man and beast than 
salt. To comply with this want we offer the SALT 
ROLLER, in the shape as shown above. Being round, 
and placed in a strong iron bracket, it revolves easily 
when licked, and the animal is enabled to partake of it 
when it has the desire for it. The animal is left to itsown 
instinct as to quantity, and is not dependent upon the 
old irregular method of salting stock. Our brackets are 
arranged so they can be fastened to a post, barn, house, 
in or out of doors, in fact anywhere, as the Roller is fully 
protected from the elements, thus making sure that your 
stock is supplieJ for acertain time to come. The Roller 
will last ordinarily three months, being made of the 
choicest, hue dairy salt, and it heingsubjected to an enor- 
mous pressure, is as solid as stone, but the saliva of the 
animal enables it easily to obtain all it wants. 

Roller ami bracket complete, 25 cts. New Rollers easily 
inserted in old brackets, only 15 cents each. 

G. G. WICKSON & CO., 

— DKALKKS IN — 

Dairy and Agricultural Implements. 

539 Market St., San Francisco. 



Swine. 




DUROC SWINE. 

Fine Pigs of the Above Breed 

FOR SALE. 

£9~Eight of my Pigs are now on record as foundation 
stock in the RECORD BOOK of the American Du- 
roc Jersey Swine Breeders' Association, of 
which I am a member. 

F. P. BEVERLY. 
Mountain View, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



JONESA POLAND CHINA FARM. 




ELLAS GALLUP, Hanford Tulare, Co., Cal. 

Breeder of pure-bred Poland China Pigs of the Black 
Beauty, Black Bess, Bismarck, and other noted families. 
Imported boars King of Bonny View and (told Dust at head 
of the herd. Btock recorded In A. P. O. R. Ptgs sold at 
reasonable rates. Correettondeuce solicited. Address as aboTe. 



IncJbajo^s. 



LONG LOOKED FOR COME AT LAST ! 

THE PACIFIC 

INCUBATOR 

Hatches Ekes Better than 

a Hen. 
Send Stamp for Illustrated Cir- 
cular to GEORGE B. BAYLEY, 
Manufacturer, 1817 Castro St., 
Oakland, Cal. 

N l : \ large line of Poultry 
Appliances, such as Wire Netting, 
Bone Mills, Chopping Machines, 
etc. , for sale at the lowest rates. 

The Pacific Coast Poulterers' 
Hand Book and Guide; price 40c. 




$25 to $300 per MONTH 

Made by Families Using the 

CALIFORNIA INCUBATOR AND BROODER 

Sold on Installments. 

A success guaranteed in raising poultry with our ma- 
chines. Automatic supply of moisture and self-regulat- 
ing. Turns eggs instantly. Best percentage of hatch 
and best chicks obtained. Machines warranted. Send 
for Circular. 

CALIFORNIA INCUBATOR CO., 
401 Tenth St (cor. Franklin), Oakland, Cal. 




I, M. HALSTED'S 

INCUBATORS 
From (20 up. 
The Model Brooder 
from $b up. Send 
for circularcontain- 
ing much valuable: 
information. 

Thoroughbred 
Poultry anil Eggs. 
1011 Broadway, 

Oakland, Car. 



NO MORE DISEASE, BUT PLENTY OF 




EGGS! EGGS!! EGGS!!! 

Ask any Grocer or Drugget for 

WELLINGTON'S IMPROVED EGG FOOD 

for POULTRY. Atao 

OP EVERY 



VARIETY I 
425 Washington Street, San PraDcisco. 




COOK FEED £& STOCK 



With the TRIUM I' II 
STEAM GENERATOR 

It will save | to * of your 
Feed, and your Btock will 
thrive better and fatten 
quicker. Send for Illustrated 
Circular. Address Truman, 
lsham & Co., 609 Market 
Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



CALVES and COWS 

Prevented suoking each other, also, self-sucking, by 
Rice's Patent Weaner. Used by all Stock Raisers. 
Prices by mail, | wet paid; For Calves till one year old, 
65 cents; till two years old, 80 cents; older, 1 1. 12. Circu- 
lars free. Agents wanted. 

H. C. RICE, Farmlngton, Coon. 



July 4, 1885.] 



pAClFIG f^URAb PRESS. 



16 



E. W. PEET, 

Importer 

£ AND 




Breeder 



THOROUGHBRED 



SPANISH MERINO SHEEP. 

400 Head for Sale. 



E. W. PEET, 
Haywards, Alameda Co.. Cal. 



LITTLES 



CHEMICAL 
FLUID 




SHEEP DIP. 

Price Reduced to 
$1.25 

PER GALLON. 



Twenty gallons of fluid 
mixed with cold water will 
make 1,200 gallons of Dip. 
It is superior to all Dips and Dressings for Scab in 
Sheep; is certain in effect; is easily mixed, and is applied 
in a cold state. Unlike sulphur or tobacco, or other 

fioisonous Dips, it increases the growth of the wool, stim- 
ates the fleece, and greatly adds to the yolk. It destroys 
all vermin. It is efficacious for almost every disease (in- 
ternal and external) sheep are subject to. 

FALKNER, BELL & CO-. 

San Francisco. Gal. 



Calvert's Carbolic 

SHEEP WASH. 

$2 per Gallon. 

After dipping the Sheep, la use- 
ful for preserving wet hides, de- 
stroying the vine pest, and for 
wheat dressings and disinfecting 
purposes, etc. T. W. JACKSON, 
S. F.. Sole Agent for Pacific Coast. 




ITALIAN 




SHEEP WASH. 

EXTRACT OF TOBACCO. 

Free from Poison. 

Cures thoroughly the SCA B 
OF THE SHEEP. The 

BEST remedy known. Costs 
Less than 1 cent per head 
for dipping. Reliable testi- 
monials at our office. For 
particulars artply to 
CHAS. DUISENBERG & CO.. Sole Agents, No. 314 Sacra 
mento Street, San Franci.'co. 

THOROUGHBRED 

SPANISH MERINO SHEEP. 

The Premium Band 
of the State. 

Took five first prem- 
iums exhibited at 
the State Fair in 1881, 
188,2, 1883, and all the 
Premiums in 1884. 

Ihis stock has no superior in the United States. I 
will sell my Bucks and Ewes at prices to suit customers, 
and in all cases guarantee satisfaction. 

Correspondence solicited. Address 

FRANK BULLARD, 

Woodland, Yolo Co., Cal. 




Thoroviglitorcd 

SPANISH MERINO SHEEP. 



We are of- 
fering this 
season 400 
head of 
year ling 
and two 
year old 
rams and 
ewes in 
lots to 
suit, bred 
from the 
leading 
registered 
flocks of 
jjUm V'e rmont 

Our stock is without superior in the State ; in good 
condition, free from all disease. Prices reduced to suit 
the market. Orders solicited, and filled with prompt- 
ness and satisfaction. 

E. W. WOOLSEY & SON, 
Pulton, Sonoma Co., Cal. 




8TUDEBAKER BRO.S M'PG CO., 



MA1WF1CTURERS OF AND DEALFES IX 




FIRST-CLASS CARRIAGES, BUGGIES AND WAGONS 



Send for Catalogue. 



WAREHOUSE, S. W. Corner) 
(75,240 feet.) 5th & King Sts. ) 



(OFFICE AND 301 &303 C fl „ Tpo nfMCPfl C.Stl' 
( SALESROOM, Market St., *>Oil ll CMll/IOl/U; Uai„ 



SOLE AGENTS FOR 

W.W. GREENER'S BREECH-LOADING 

Doulolo Guns. 

For Strength, Durability, Style, Finish and Extraordinai-y 
Shooting Qualities those Guns are unsurpassed. 

COLT, PARKER, SMITH, and REMINGTON 

Double Guns. 

Champion, Forehand & Wadsworth, and 
Remington Single Guns. 

Winchester, Billiard, Colt New Lightning, Marlin, and Kennedy Repeating Rifles. 

BALLARD and REMINGTON SPORTING and TARGET RIFLES. 
Colt and JSirxi tli cfc "Wesson PistolH. 

AMMUNITION AT LOWEST PRICES. 

N. CURRY & BRO., - 113 Sansome St.. San Francisco. 

Pacific Coast Agents for the Merino Elastic Felt Gun Wads. 




LARGE PAY FOR ACTIVE AGENTS, 

The People's Cyclopcedia ! 

New 3- Volume Edition. $5,000 per year earned by one Agent. 

STODDARD'S LIFE OF LINCOLN. 

Just ready. Immense sale. 
Full Line of Choice New Books by Subscription. 

PHILLIPS & HUNT, - - 1041 Market St., San Francisco. 



THOROUGHBRED MERINO 



mm 





We Have on Hand and JT"C^n .«-» /"V T » F! 

OVER 500 TWO-YEAR-OLD 

THOROUGHBRED AMERICAN MERINO 
RAMS,"f ouxown breeding, in splendid condition. Also, 
aliout the same number of Yearling Kama. 

<3TTo reach us, come via Stockton to Milton, where a 
conveyance to the ranch will he furnished on Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fiidays. Correspondence will receive 
prompt attention. Circulars sent on application. Address : 
KIRKPATRICK & WHITTAKER. 
Iron Mountain Ranch, 

Knight's Perry, Cal. 

April 25, 1885. 



DEWEY & CO. { ^e^t^F^tl/- } PATENT AGENTS. 



Dr. Ricord's Restorative Pills. 

BUY NONE BUT THE GENUINE. 
A Specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces, etc. 

Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Pari*, and by 
medical celebrities of the world. Agents lor California 
and the Pacific States: 

J. G. STEELE & CO., 
635 Market St., (Palace Hotel) San Fkaucitco, Cal. 
Sent by Mail or Express anywhere. 
PRICES. REDUCED-Box of 50, 81.26; of lOO, $2.00; 
of 200, *S.50; of 400, jftOO. Preparatory Pills, »2.00. 
laTScnd for Circular. 

A P F M TQ WANTED for the History of Christianity, 
HUulllO '>y Abbott. A grand chance. A $4 book 
at the popular price of tl.16. Libeial terms. The re- 
ligious papers mention it as one of the few great religious 
works of the world. Greater success never known by 
agents. Terms free, ST1NSON $ CO., Publishers, Port- 
i land, Maine. 



ills, ttc 



HORTON & KENNEDY'S 

FAMOTJ3 

ENTERPRISE 

Self-Regulating 

WINDMILL 

(s recognized a 
tub Bust. 

Always gives satisfaction. SIMPLE, 
STRONG and DURABLE in all parts. 
Solid Wrought-iron Crank Shaft with 
double bearings for the Crank to 
work in, all turned and run in adjust- 
able babbitted boxes. 

Positively Self-Regulating, 

With no coil springs, or springs of any kind. No little 
rods, joints, levers, or anything of the kind to get out of 
order, as such things do. Mills in use 6 to 12 years in 
good order now, that have never cost one cent for repairs. 
All genuine Enterprise Mills for the Pacific Coast trade 
come only through this agency, and none, whether of 
the old or latest pattern, are genuine except those bear- 
ing the "Enterprise Co." stamp. Look out for this, as 
Inferior mills are being offered with testimonials applied 
to them which were given for ours. Prices to suit the 
times. Full particulars free. Best Pumps, Feed Mills, 
etc., kept in stock. Address, 

HORTON & KENNEDY. 

GENERAL OFFICE AND SUPPLIES (as always before), 
LIVERMORE, ALAMEDA CO., CAL. 

San Francisco Agency-JAMES LINFORTH 
116 Front St., San Francisco. 





REDUCED PRICES OF 

THE HALLADAY WIND-MILL 

WITHOUT TOWER: 

10-foet wheel $65 00 

12-foot wheel 85 00 

13,foot wheel 100 00 

OSend for Circulars. 

AUSTIN BROS., Agents, 

Stockton, Cal. 

THE IMPROVED CYCLONE 

WIJJD3VIIT.T.. 

Requires less atten- 
tion, is more durable, 
nnd less complicated 
than any oth6r mill. 

The machinery is constructed 
on scientific principles, and 
so well proportioned and 
securely fastened that break- 
age is impossible. Took first 
premium at the San Mateo 
and Santa Clara Fair of 1883. 
4ST Aoknts Wangec. Correspondence Solicited. 

BENTiLEY & SMITH, Prop's & Mf'ra., 
San Jose, Cal. 





HOKKI'. POWERS, WINDMILLS, TANKS 
a-nd all kinds of Pumping Machinery built to order 
jBP"SondiforiCataloguc and Price List. 

F. W. KROGH & CO., 

51 Beale St., San Francisco. 



OThe BUYERS' GUIDE U 
issued March and Sept., 
«ach year, tt .■>■ 216 page*, 
<8%xll% lnches,wlth over 
3,500 illustration* — a 
whole Picture Gallery. 
GIVES Wholesale Prices 
djrwet to Mrnnnnm on all (roods for 
personal <>r family use. Tells how to 
order, and gives exact cost of every- 
thing you etse, eat, drink, wear, or 
have tan with. These INVALUABLE 
BOOKS contain information gleaned 
from the markets of the world. We 
will mall a copy FREE to any ad- 
dress upon receipt of tO cts. to defray 
expense of mailing. I.« » us hear from 
you. Respectfully, 

MONTGOMERY WARD & CO. 

827 ifc 229 Wabash Avenue. Chicago, III. 



\25* 



jjomic Transparent and 25 (no 2 alike) Chromo Cards, 
name on, 10c Present free. A. Hines, Cassville, O, 



16 



PACIFIC RURAL* p>RES 



S. 



[July 4, 1885 



S.H.CDaRKEtJ^ejpqiit 



Note.— Our quotationsare for Wednesday, not Saturda) 
the date which the paper bears. 



Weekly Market Review. 

DOMESTIC PRODUCE, ETC. 

San Francisco, July i, 1885. 

The markets are of very little account this week. 
The Produce Exchange closed last night and will 
not reopen until next Tuesday. There has been no 
general business except for immediate needs and 
the great staples are as a rule repo'ted dull and 
weak. The buyers are holding off, advices from 
abroad favor indolence and there does not seem 
reason to expect much for the next lortnight. The 
latesr from foreign part- is as follows: 

Liverpool, June 30.— The spot market is dull at 
6s iod@7S id. Cargoes are lower, at 35s for off 
coast, 36s 6d for just shipped, and 35s for nearly 
due. 

City Grain Stocks. 

How little the visible supply of grain has changed 
during the last month m;iy be learned from the fol- 
lowing: The stock of ( irain in the city warehouses 
on the 30th of June, as furnished by A.J. Gove, 
grain inspector of the San Francisco Produce Ex- 
change, was as follows as compared with June 1st: 
June 1st. June 30th. 

Wheat, tons 7.375 99&° 

Barley 7.571 7,486 

Oats 3.3 8 3 3.479 

Corn 5 2 9 785 

Bran 4.653 4. '5' 

The Foreign Review. 
London, June 29.— The Mark Lane Express, in 
its review of the British grain trade during the past 
week, says: There have been violent changes of 
temperature and cold winds have prevailed. The 
Wheat acreage is covered with good crops. The 
cold weather has been detrimental to the later sown 
crops. Foreign Wheat is firmer. The off coast 
trade has been on a small scale. Four cargoes ar- 
rived, five cargoes were sold, seven withdrawn and 
six remained. Thirty-five cargoes are due. The 
feeling in the market to-day was disappointing to 
sellers. More money was asked for English Wheat, 
but no advance was obtainable. There was limited 
inquiry for foreign descriptions. Flour was difficult 
of sale. Corn was 3d cheaper. There was notiiing 
doing in Birley. Oats were dull. Beans and Peas 
were unchanged. 

Eastern Wool Markets. 
New York, June 28. — The condition and ten- 
dency of business on the local market seems to be 
about as for some little time past. Buying is con- 
fined entirely to a basis of secured orders for goods 
and there seems to be no attraction to move beyond 
that limit. The week's movement has been extreme- 
ly moderate in pretty much all kinds of stock and 
all hands grumble somewhat over the condition of 
trade. On the business made public, old rates were 
shown and the tone is nominally steady. From the 
rountry there is not much news, except in some sec- 
tions of Ohio. A few Eastern buyers and a number 
of local speculators have commenced handling the 
clip at 28 cents and growers are becoming stiffer 
again in their views. Foreign accounts are easy. 
Sales include 13,000 pounds scoured California at 
36@40 cents. 

New York Hop Trade. 
New York, June 28. — The market shows no 
signs whatever of animation. There are no export 
inquiries and brewers buy in a hand-to-mouth way 
only, dealers making no efforts to force trade, in 
view of these conditions, but more than one holder 
would quickly clinch a bu)e. who might offer prices 
that are said to be paid in some sec. ions of the inter- 
ior. A very good article can be secured here at 12 
cents, but over that is seldom bid, and then only 
fo~ goods that are not to be found. There has been 
an effort made to ascertain the amount of stock here 
in a quiet way, the purpose of which is problemati- 
cal. Pacific Coast crop, 1884, poor to choice, 8(eti2 
cents. 

London Agricultural Seed Trade. 

I Reported by .Iohn Shaw s Sons, Seed Merchants. | 
Wednesday, June 10, 1885. 

As usual at this period an exceedingly quiet leel- 
ing now characterises the trade for farm seeds. 
Hardly any variety is for the moment actually 
wanted, and all speculation being dead, there is con- 
sequently just now nothing moving. A few small 
sowing orders for mustard, rapeseed and tares come 
to hand which are executed on former terms. The 
demand for bird seeds is very languid. Feeding 
linseed is rather dearer. 

37 Mark Lane, London, Eng. 

The English Wheat and Flour Market. 

[Reported by Anton Ki kkkk .v. Co., Liverpool, England.) 

Business still remains in the state of suspense re- 
ported last week, but signs of animation are begin- 
ning to appear; shippers are lowering their limits, 
and are endeavoring to come to a basis on which 
business is possible. Freights have been reduced and 
we are nearer to common ground than we have 
been since before the war scare. The arrivals this 
week amount to 353,220 quarters, and though on a 
very reduced scale as compared with recent weeks, 
are still equal to the week's requirements. The total 
imports since SepL 1st are now 12.586,065 quarters, 
which is nearly 1,000,000 quarters too much compu- 
ting the requirements at 16,000,000 per annum. 
The crop report continues very bad and the shortage 
in Europe will be very considerable as compared 
with last year. The harvest is likely also to be late, 
and these facts added to the undoubted deficiency 
that there will be in America would seem to make 
present prices very sound. 

Liverpool, May 28, 1885. 

BAGS — Stocks heavy. Holders are reasonably 
firm. Calcutta Wheat, sfes^'c; California fute 
5%c; Potato Gunnies, io@iic. 

BARLEY -All seem to be holding off on barley 
at present and a low nominal rate is given. On 
call there is considerable doing. Yesterday's sales 
were: Buyer season— 100, $1.28)4 ; 100, $1,285^; 



100, $i.28Mi; 100, $1.28. Seller season -100, $1.11 M 
Buyer, '85 1,000, $1.21 % ; 200, $1.22:100, i.2tK 
200, $1.21 y, ; 300, $i.2i?4; 100, <i -m ; , Seller '85 
— too, $1.12; 100, $i.n#; 100, $1.11/5; 309 
$i.nM:do, new crop -200. Buyer season- -100 
$i.27Ji; 400, $1.28. Buyer '85 -100, fi.ai; 400, 
$1.22; 100, $1.22!^! 100, fi.BiK; 1,000, ft.aifi 
Siller '85— ioc, $.12; do, new crop — too, %i.Jl% 
200, $1.12^; do, after Sept. ist--ioo, $145,^; 100, 
$1.15. Sales on the California Exchange were 
5ars, July, $1,075$; 3 at $1.08; 4iosks feed, $1.08^ 
coo, $1.10. 

BEAN'S — Dealers report trade unsatisfactory and 
rates for some sorts, especially pea and small white, 

lower. 

COKN — There is considerable supply of large 
yellow, with other sorts not so abundant. Good 
lots go at $1.25 $? ctl, and inferior about 5c ctl 

less. 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. — Butter prices have ac 
cumulated again and receivers have marked prices 
down 15c per pound all around. Cheese is un 
changed and plentiful. 

FEED. — Bran is lower this week. Hay receipts 
are large and prices considerably reduced. Choice 
wheat and wild oat, $14 per ton. Fair to good lots 
run as follows: Wheat and wild oat, $io(a 12; bar 
ley, %j(ti 10; stable, $io@ 13; alfalfa, $io@i2; cow 
$ic@ 13 per ion. 

FRFSH MEAT — There is no change except in 
live pork. Supplies of hogs have declined and 
prices improved a little. Sales of live stock for the 
week as reported to the Grocer as fellows. 

San Francisco Stock Yards. 396 Cattle (large; 
goodl $42 00, 568 Cattle (medium; fair) $34 00, 
351 Cattle mixed; rather thin $30 00, 634 Calves, 
$5 75. $ 8 °°. $'° 5°. $'3 °°. S'° 00. $18 00. 5178 
Sheep $1 75, $2 25, $2 50. $2 75, $3 xo. 2591 
Spring Lambs, $1 25, $1 50, $1 75, $2 10. 1464 
Hogs, 354c, 3^c, 3HC, 4HC 

Oakland Stock Yards. 173 Cattle (large; fat 
$43 00, 205, Cattle (medium; fair) $32 00, 179 
Calves, $5 75; $8 60, $12 50, J14 00, $17 50. 86a 
Sheep, $2 25, $2 50, $2 75, $3 15. 598 Lamtte,. 
$1 50. $' 75. %z 25- 340 Hogs, 3 Kc, 3 ft c , 4C 
4^c. 

FRL'IT — Apricots are lessening in amount and 
steadier this week. Currants are also decreasing, 
but there are plenty for the demand. Blackberries 
are largely in excess this week. Grapes are of all 
qualities and prices from 25 to f 1 per box. Water- 
melons are declining. Peaches are holding up 
pretty well, and figs are less in amount. Ruling 
prices are given in our table. 

HOPS— Prices are unchanged here. Telegraphic 
advices gives interviews with New York dealers who 
generally talk down prices and predict a large crop 
at the East. There is time enough to have that 
proved first. It is said that New York growers are 
contracting for ioc fcf ft— it does not say how many. 
OATS— Oats are very dull and prices unchanged. 
ONIONS— There are not many onions in and 
prices hold at $2.50 for white and $2.25 for reds — 
for the best lots. 



POTATOES— All kinds arc about 5c ctl lower; 
the best Early Lose and Chile bring 70c $ ctl in 

boxes. 

POULTRY AND GAME. — Turkeys aie selling 
well. Roosters are lower because of large supplies, 
and there is complaint of the experienced character 
of some of the "young roosters." Ducks are lower 
and hens a little higher than last week. 

PROVISIONS — Provisions are reported low and 
weak. California hams are marked down a fraction 
because of large supplies. 

VEGETABLES — String beans and peas are hold- 
ing up well. Most other vegetables are more abun- 
dant and lower than last week. 

WHEAT. Wheat has been a little higher since 
our last report, but has settled back to the rates 
given a week ago. Call sales to-day were: Bayer 
season 100, $1.66; 700, $1.65^; 200, $1.65^ 
Buyer, '85,-100, $1.57*; 300, $156^; 400, $1.57 
Buyer season— 100, fl.65%. Buyer, '85 — 100, 
$1.65^. Buyer, '85 100, '$1.5754. Seller '85 - 
100, $1.41. 

WOOL.- Trade is reported very dull and prices 
shaded in some cases. Defective stocks are neg- 
lected. 



Domestic) Produoe. 



PACIFIC COAST WEATHER FOR THE WEEK. 

[Furnished for publication In this paper by Nelson Ooroh, Sergeant Signal Service Corps, TJ. S. A 



DATE. 



June 25 ,Inly 1 



Thursday ... 

Friday 

Saturday..., 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 
Totals 



Portland. 



71 NW C>\ 



Red Bluff 



B 

N W 
N 

\ W 
8 W 
W 

8 



Sacramento. S. Francisco. Los Angeles. San Diego 



sw 

w 

w 

w 

w 

8W 
SW 



a n 
h 

sw 

72 SW 
81 



CI. 
CI. 
Cy. 
Fr. 
CI. 
Fr. 
Fr. 



Explanation. — CI. for clear; Cy., cloudy; Fr., fair; Fy., foggy; — indicates too small to measure 
wind and weather at 12:00 «. (Pacific Standard time), with amount of rainfall in the preceding 24 hours! 



Temperature 



Cornmeal 28 00(830 00 Quail -3 - 

Hay 8 00 «n 00 Rabbits 1 25 I 1 50 

Middlings 20 00 322 50 Hare 2 00 I 2 25 

Oil Cake Meal, n Venison - § - 

Straw, bale 60 3 65 PROVISIONS. 

FLOUR. Cal. Bacon, 

Extra, City Mills 4 25 @ 5 00 Heavy, lb 9«a 10 

do Co'ntry Mills 4 00 S 4 62J Medium 9l@ 10 

Superfine 2 75 3 3 50 Light 12]3 12j 

FKESH MEAT Extra Light . . 13J3 - 

Beef, lift qual., lb 8 t» Lard '.lift? 119 

Second 5»3 — CaLSraokedBeef Uj3 H» 

Third if 5 Shoulders lug 13 

Mutton 413 5 Hams, Cal lojl 151 

Spring Lamb.... 513 6i do Eastern.. 1213 131 
Pork, undressed. 313 5« SEEDS. 

Dressed 5J3 6 Alfalfa. 12J@ 20 

Veal... 713 U do Chile -@ 

CHAIN ETC Canary 3)3 4 

Barley, feed. ctl. 1 15 3 1 15 Clover red 4 3 16 

do Brewing.. 1 20 ■ 1 30 White 46 3 60 

Chevalier 1 » 3 1 30 Cotton 203 

do Coast... 1 10 3 1 20 i Flaxseed 213 2J 

Buckwheat 1 25 3 1 30 Hemp ':■;■< 3] 

Corn, White.... 1 22Jg 1 25 Italian RyeOrasa 28 3 — 

Yellow 1 22 3 1 25 Perennial ■ 3 — 

Small Round. 1 25 3 1 2,1 Millet, German.. 10 W IS 

Nebraska 1 05 3 1 10 do Common. 7 8 10 

Oats, choice 1 40 3 1 15 Mustard, white.. 2)3 3 

do No 1 1 25 3 1 35 Brown 3{3 3{ 

do No. 2 1 10 3 1 20 Rape 2 6* 2i 

do black 1 10 3 1 12} Ky. Blue Grass.. 

do Oiegnn 1 17i3 1 25 

Bye. 1 30 i 



2d quality 16 3 

1 35 iSweet V. Oi 



Wheat, No. L.. 1 45 
do No. 2... 1 42I3 
Choice muling 1 4713 1 
HIDES. 

Dry 1613 

Wet sakWl 713 

HONEY, ETC. 

Beeswax, lb 25 3 

Honey in comb. 6 3 
Extracted, light. — 3 
do dark. 4 3 
HOPS. 

Oregon — 3 

California 4 3 

Wash. Ter — 3 

Old Hops — 3 

ONIONS 

Red 1 75 3 2 

Silversktn 2 25 «> 2 50 Oregon. Eastern 

do Oregon.... — 3 — di Valley, 
do Utah — 3 — 



75 3 

Orchard- 20 3 

Red Top 16 3 

Hungarian. ... 83 

Lawn SO 3 

Mesouit 10 3 

Timuthy 6 3 

TALLOW. 

26 Crude, lb 5 3 

10 Refined 7r3 

U WOOL, ETC. 

— I 8PRIN0— 1885. 
Mendocino and 

— 1 Sonoma 18 3 

7 Northern 15 3 

— San Joaquin. .. 11 3 

— South Coast.... 10 3 
Calaveras and 
Foothill 



1.00 

.60 
.26 
.75 



14 3 

13 c<r 
16 (o> 



Fruits and Vegetables. 



WHOLESALE. 



FRUIT MARKET 
Apples, box..... 10 3 40 

AprU Ota, bx 48 3 65 

ISanauas. bunch. 1 50 (« 2 50 



Cherries, bx 40 <<* 

Cherrypluiua 20 (c* 30 

Cantalonpes.daa 2 00 (jr 4 00 

rabapplea. box 25 iff 

l,s, bx 25 40 

Gooseberries 5 c* 8 

rapes, box 50 3 75 



Wednesday. 


.inly I, 1885. 




743 




do pared. . . 


.. 12!^ 


13 


Pears, sliced. 


2 3 


3 




1 3 


1 




23 


3 


Plum 1 pitted. 


4 3 


5 




.... 5 3 


1 


do French . . 




Raisins, Cal. bx. 2 25 3 ! 


5U 



halves.... 
quarters. . 
eighths. 



urrauts, chst.. . 2 25 <rt 2 75 Zaute Currants. 



Limes. Mex 11 00 <?12 00 



VEGETABLES 



do Cal. box ... 75 3 1 25 Asparagus bx 



Lemons, Cal.,bx 1 00 < 
do Sicily, box. 7 00 1 
do Australian. 

ectariues box. 50 1 



3 00 Artichokes, doz. 

; 01) Beets, ctL 

- Cabbage, 100 lbs. 

1 00 Carrots, sk. 



oranges, Cal . In 1 00 3 2 00 Cauliflower, dor. 



do Tahiti, M y 00 
do Mexican, M 
do Panama... — 3 

Peaches, bx . . . 35 3 

lo basket.... 2i 3 
do Crawford.bx 50 



10 00 Celery, dox 60 fj - 

— Cucumbers box . 50 <S 1 25 

— Eggplant, ft. 8 (<t 10 

50 Garlic, lb 2}3 31 

40 Green Com, doz 83 18 

Green Peas, sk 



Pears bx 25 la 60 I do Bweet, lb. 

Pineapples, doz. 6 00 <g 7 00 Lettuce, dox 

Plums It. 1 (St 2 Mushrooms, lb... 

spberries, ch 4 00 O 6 00 Okra, green lb... 



4 00 

3 



BEANS AND PEAS. 

Bayo, ctl 2 60 3 2 75 

Butter 75 3 1 25 

Castor 4 00 3 — 

Pea 1 50 3 1 80 

Red. 1 50 3 1 65 

Pink 1 35 3 1 50 

Large White.... 3 00 3 — 
Small White.... 1 50 3 1 80 

Lima 1 CO 3 1 75 

F id Peas.blk eye 1 25 3 1 50 

do green 3 00 3 

BROOM CORN. 

Southern 3 3 

Northern 4 3 

CHICCORY. 

California 4 3 

German 6)3 

DAIRY PRODUCE, ETC 

BUTTER. 

Cal fresh roll, lb. 17)3 

do Fancy br'nds 21 3 

Pickle roll 15 3 

Firkin, new 15 3 

Eastern 16 § 

New York - <§ 

CHEE8E 

Cheese, Cal . lb.. 6 3 
Eastern style... 

EOOS. 

Cal., ranch, doz.. 

do, store 

Ducks 

Oregon 

Eastern, by ex . . 
Pickled here.... 

Utah 

FEED. ~ 
Bran, ton 15 00 018 00 



16 3 



16 1 



WHOLESALE 

I Wednesday. July 1, 1886. 

NUTS-Jobbino. 
Walnuts. Cai.Ib 7 3 
do Chile. 7t3 
Almonds, hdshl 7 3 

Soft shell 10 (tt 1 

Brazil 10 (ft 1 

Pecaus •> 3 1 

Peanuts 3 3 

Filberts 14 3 

POTATOES. 

Bnrtans — @ 

Early Rose 35 (ft 

Cuffey Core — & 

Petaluma — & 

Tomales — 3 

River reds — 3 

4} Humboldt — 3 

7 do Kidney.... — 3 

do Peachblow. - 3 

Jersey Blue 3 

M Chile 50 3 

do Oregon... 3 

17 j Peerless <a 

17j Salt Lake — <§ _ 

18 Sweet ctl _ <a 

— POULTRY AND GAME. 

Hens, doz 5 00 3 7 00 

Roosters r i 00 3 7 00 

171 Broilers 8 50 3 4 00 

Ducks, tame 3 50 3 5 00 

n Geese, pair 1 25 

18 Wild Gray, doz - 
White do... 76 

— Turkeys, lb 15 

18 do Dressed.. — 

— TurkeyFeathers, 

— tail and wing.. 10 
Snipe, Eng., doz. 1 50 

do Common.. 75 



70 



1-1 



1 50 



1 00 

19 



20 



R 

Strawberries ch. 3 50 3 5 00 
Wutenncl.m.doz 3 10 3 4 00 
DRIED FRUIT 
iples, sliced, lb 2 3 
Lo evaporated. 6 3 
do quartered 
Apricots 

Blackberries.... 8 

Citron 28 

Dates 

Figs., pressed.... 4 

Figs, loose 2 

Nectarines 9 



Parsnips, ctl. 



1 00 

Peppers, dry lb. . 
do green, Iwx 1 00 3 2 00 
3 Rhubarb b,x... 75 3 1 50 
6 Squash, Marrow 

2 fat, too 5 00 <» 

8 do Summer bx 20 (ft 

do Bay 

30 Tomatoes box . . 
104 String beans. . . 
5 do Fountain. 

2i Turnips ctl 

10 I 



25 3 
25 3 
3 3 

75 tit 



17 



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"One or our host interibtiko exciumoes," ia the way 
the Southern'^Planter, of Richmond, Vs., apeaka of the 
Rural Press. 



INSURE YOUR GROWING GRAIN 



CROPS 



IN THE FIREMAN'S FUND OF CALIFORNIA. 



July 4, 1885.] 



fACIFie RURAId f>RESS. 



17 



Stockton Notes. 

Bv J. C. H.] 

A Rukal representative made a tour of Stock- 
ton and vicinity and found the crops in that 
section much better than has heretofore be<n 
represented. Some of the well-tilled farms will 
produce from twenty to thirty bushels per acre, 
and on the west side the grain crop, while it is 
a failure there, is good feed for stock. Mr. J. 
P. Archibald, of Merced, is harvesting one 
thousand acres of wheat that will -average thirty 
bushels to the acre. Although this crop is an 
exception, it may here be stated that Mr. 
Archibald summer- fallowed and double plowed, 
while some of his neighbors who sowed their 
crop on stubble will hardly get their seed back. 

Combined Harvesters. 

The Stockton combined harvesters are giving 
satisfaction. Although crops have been a par- 
tial failure, and farmers have retrenched in 
farming machines, yet the most of the machines 
manufactured last year and this in Stockton 
will be sold. The Stockton Combined Har- 
vester Works are hurrying all they can to finish 
seven that have been ordered of the "Minges" 
patent, which has been secured by this com- 
pany. It is a "Full" machine, and is built 
from 18 to 27 feet wide according to order. 
Mr. Tully, Ceres, Stanislaus Co., is running a 
26-foot machine of the "Minges" patent, and 
he informed our reporter that he had cut and 
harves ed 700 acres this year and on an aver- 
age of 50 to 60 acres per day; four men per- 
forming the labor with twenty-six horses. He 
estimates that with these "Minges" patent 
harvesters, he can harvest his grain better and 
at less than half the cost of the old way. The 
"Push" machines, manufactured by the Stock- 
ton Combined Harvester Works, with the im- 
provements made this year, are bringing in 
reports of perfect work and entire satisfaction. 
The encouragement given to the promoters of 
this industry is such that the manager, Mr. E. 
P. Palmer, concluded and contracted for 100,- 
000 feet of sugar and Oregon pine, for the com- 
ing season, for manufacturing these harvesters. 
It is the purpose of this company to build three 
different classes of machines suited to the con- 
dition and capacity of different farmers. The 
"Shippee," combined with Gratton's improve- 
ments, is adapted to the rancher with small 
farms and their own use; while those who have 
large ranches, or wish to engage in harvesting 
for hire, prefer the "Pull" machine, manu- 
factured under the "Minges" patent. 

Our representative paid a visit to the Houser 
Combined Harvester Works and found a full 
force, the men putting the finishing touches on 
machines that had been built or ordered for this 
year; Mr. Houser informed us he had already 
sold 44. In conversation with several farmers 
who were using them, they spoke in highest 
terms of their efficiency and economy in har- 
vesting their crops. It seems to be no longer a 
mooted question, that the combined harvesters 
are displacing the header and thresher univer- 
sally. 

Poultry. 

Our representative, at the request of Mr. 
Cutting, paid a visit to the California Poul try 
Farm, near Stockton. To those who have never 
seen the system of carrying on a poultry farm, 
it will well pay them to make a visit and see the 
manner in which it is conducted. This farm 
covers ten acres of grouni fenced off in lots, 
and each compartment having a small poultry 
house with over fifty different varieties of land 
and water fowl. The White Mountain incuba- 
tor is used exclusively in hatching, and in the 
nursery, so called, we found 600 young fowl 
from the size of a quail to a small chick, sepa- 
rated iu families of about thirty, each provided 
with the ingenious apparatus of an artificial 
mother, working out their existence alone. We 
saw several baskets wi'h eggs rc ady for ship- 
ment to different parts of the country outside 
the State, and perused a letter from Honolulu 
from a poultry raiser, stating that in a shipmeDt 
of eggs that had traveled 2,000 miles by water, 
100 miles by rail, and 3 miles by ox teams in 
the interior of the Sandwich Islands, a satisfac 
tory return of 70 per cent was had on all eggs 
shipped by Messrs. Cutting & Robinson. The 
interest in thoioughbred and fancy fowl is grow- 
ing every year, and Messrs. Cutting & Robinson 
informed us that the amount for eggs and 
chicks had been quite satisfactory this year. 
Parties wishing to engage in the business of 
poultry raising would do well to call and see 
this model farm. Mr. L. Cutting is quite will- 
ing and ready to escort visitors who desire, 
daily on the trip from Stockton, which can be 
made in two hours. 



HALL'S 

SARSAPARILLA 

Cures all Diseases originating from 
a disordered state of the BLOOD or 
LIVER. Rheumatism, Neuralgia, 
Boils, Blotches, Pimples, Scrofula, 
Tumors, Salt Rheum and Mercurial 
Pains readily yield to its purifying 
properties. It leaves the Blood pure, 
the Liver and Kidneys healthy and 
the Complexion bright and clear. 
J. R. CATES & GO. Proprietors, 

417 Sansome St. San Francisco 

Dewey & Co.'s Scientific Press 
Patent Agency. 



ANDERSON 



Nkbkaska State Fair. — We have received 
from Hon. R. W. Furnas, secretary of the 
Nebraska State Board of Agriculture, an invi- 
tation to attend the Nebraska State Fair, to be 
held at the city of Lincoln, the capital of the 
State, September 11th to 18th, inclusive. The 
premium list which is a well arranged pamph- 
let, shows a fine schedule of awards and fore- 
shadows a grand display of agricultural pro- 
ducts and materials. 



On Mvrobolan Stocks. — James O'Neill, of 
the Myrobolan Nursery at Haywards, asks us 
to invite any parties wishing to see the peach 
and apricot bearing on myrobolan root, to visit 
his nursery at Haywards. The trees are two 
and three years old, large and thrifty, and 
loaded with fine fruit. 




Our U. S. and Foreign Patent Agency 
presents many and important advantages as a 
Home Agency over all others, by reason of long 
establishment, great experience, thorough sys- 
tem, intimate acquaintance with the subjects of 
inventions in our own community, and our 
most extensive law and reference library, con 
taining official American and foreign reports, 
files of scientific and mechanical publications, 
etc. All worthy inventions patented through 
our Agency will have the benefit of an illustra- 
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tific Press. We transact every branch of 
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tries which cjrant protection to inventors. The 
large majority of U. S. and Foreign Patents 
issued to inventors on the Pacific Coast have 
been obtained through our Agency. We can 
give the bfst and most reliable advice as to the 
patentability of new inventions. Our prices 
are as low as any first-class agencies in the 
Eastern States, while our advantages for Pacific 
Coast inventors are far superior. Advice and 
Circulars free. 

DEWEY & CO., Patent Agents. 
No. 252 Market St. Elevator 12 Front St. 

S. F. Telephone No. 658. 

A. T. DEWEY. W. B. EWER. GEO. H. STRONG. 

THE DIXON CRUCIBLE CO 

JERSEY CITY, N. J. 

■ Manufacturers of 

DIXON'S BLACK LEAD CRUCIBLE J. 
DIXON'S LEAD PENCILS. 
DIXON'S STOVE POLISH. 
DIXON'S AXLE GREASE. 
DIXON'S PLUMBAGO. 
DIXON'S BLACK LEAD. 
DIXON'S GRAPHITE. 

J. G. ALLEN, 

Sole Agent for the Pacific Cosst. 
106 Davis St. (near California), San Francisco 
£S"Prices same as at Factory. 



IRVING INSTITUTE, 

A Boarding and Day School 
FOR YOUNG LADIES, 

1036 Va'encla Street. San Francisco. 

TUB KBIT SESSION 

Will Begin July 27, 1885. 

Rev. EDW. B. CHURCH, A M., Princii al. 



SPRINGS 



SO Dolla 



WILL BUY A 



Rival Wind-Mill! 



FAVORITE 



Summer Resort of Lake County, 



The well known Anderson Springs, four miles from 
Middletown, Lake County. Good accommodations, home 
cooking, iron springs, cottages for families, and all the 
advantages of a first-class summer resort. The finest 
steam baths in the world. Pure cold sulphur water. 
Dyspeptics, consumptives, and those affected with torpid 
liver, rapidly improve here. 

The Anderson Springs Stage visits Middletown daily 
for the accommodation of guests coming from S. F. via. 
Calistoga, or from any part of Lake County. 

HaTSend for Circulars and further information. Address 
the proprietors, 

ANDERSON & PATRIQUIN. 

Middletown, Lake Co , Cal. 

DEDERICK'S HAY PRESSES. 

„ • the customer 

^ V o<**\e** e gj\ ke. ping the one 



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532 California St., cor. of Webb -For the half year 
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and after July 1, 1885. 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society, 

For the half-rear ending Jnrie 30, 1885, the Board of 
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By order. GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 



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in 




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crq 



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§ 
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3 

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er 

o 

§ 



We have, through the solicit itinns of many of our cus- 
tomers, constructed a cheaper Mill than the Althouse, 
which we are prepared to supply at a very low figure. It 
w_ill be found strong and serviceable, and for ordinary 
work wdl very efficiently supply the place of more ex- 
pensive Mills. Its construction is simple, and it runs 
with the lightest winds. It is easily erected, being de- 
void of all complication Every part is accurately dupli- 
j cated and extra parts, if required, can always be pro- 
' cured. #gf For further particulars address 
WOODIN & LITTLE 
509 and 511 Market S:reet, San Francisco. 



Order on trial, address for circiil ir and location of 
Western and Southern Storehouses and Accdis. 

• •- p'oesics ft ca. / ■■ — • • " 



$2,000 BURNS 

HOT-AIR FRUIT EVAPORATOR 

Of Pour Sections, 
With good buildicg 20x40 and two town lots in city of 
Fresno. Must b3 sold. Now is the time to buy, as the 
Fiuit S jp >son is commencing. One-half interest for 
■•51,0.(0. Apply to 

FRESNO LAND OFFICE, 
W. P. HABER, Manager. Fresno, Cal. 

Ritchie's Safety Attachment 

FOIt HORNED AMIMALS, 

Or Bull Conqueror. 

Pat. April 8, 1884. Entire 
Patent or Territory for 
sale. $5 and $5 no per set. 
Sent to any part of TJ. S. 
on receipt of price. Circu- 
lar and testimonials sent 
on application. Fin-lose 
stamp for reply. Address 

OKO. W. It ITCH IK, 
Arrous-nidt, - ll||not«. 




FARMERS, ATTENTION ! 

USB ONLY 

Will & Fincrs Hand-Forged and Hanl-Finisiied 

SPRING-EYE NEEDLES. 

Best in the World. Ask your dealnr for thom. 

GRIND YOUR OWN BONE, 

Meal, Oyster Shells & Corn in the 

yHAND MILL 
(F. Wilson's Patent.) lOO 
per ct. more made in keepincr Poultry. Also Power 
IHills and Farm Feed Mills. Circulars and testi- 
monials sent on application. WILSON BROS. 
EASTON, Penna. The Pacific Coast supplied by 

HAWLEY BROS. HARDWARE CO., 

U^t- **> 309 JUHlifiT St. San Francisco. Cal. 





This is a cut of our very elegant and excellent abdom- 
iiii.il support for ladies. It fits the form perfectly, and 
for the support it gives is worth all we ask for it. It is 
not only a support and protc Hon to the spine and abdo- 
men, but it contains our Magnetic .Shield, which 
relieves all aches and pains in a few minutes; strengthens, 
tones and revitalizes all the weak organs and tissues in a 
few months. 

There ate thousands of women in all parts of the coun- 
try who a*e rinding these belts their only relief. There 
is warmth, comfort, life and action secured from wear- 
ing thtm. They wear for years, and do not lose their 
virtue. 

We have tried all kinds and classes of curative agents; 
we have had years 01 experience in treating all forms of 
female complaints, and this b It is worth all the drugs, 
manipu'ation, bandages, supports, pads and plasters on 
the market. When the back is lame, tender or sore, wear 
this belt. When the kidneys are too active, too sluggish, 
inflamed, or are diseased with any form of kidney 
troubles, put the belt on. When there is inaction of 
the bowels, put the belt on. When there are any abdom- 
inal troubles, known as female ailment.), put the belt 
on, and we will risk our reputation that re'ief and euro 
will come quicker than by the application or use of any 
other treatment. Ladies, try these magnetic belts, for 
in them is eomlort and help for you in all your special 
ailments. 

£3fSend for "Plain Road to Health." Free. 

CHICAGO MAGNETIC SHIELD CO., 

106 Post St., San Francisco. 



TO WINE-MAKERS. 



A RARE OPPOlTl.'Niry to purchase l, r >0 to 200 tons 
of the finest CJra; es, with the privilege of manufacturing 
them into wine on the premises; ce'lar and other facili- 
ties giv.n. Very little outlay to make wine. 
iTSTFor particulars address 

X , care CHAS. RHINE, 
Clayton, Contra Costa Co., Cal. 



CLADDING. M: BEAN &C0. 



SEWER, WATER AND 



CHIMNEY PIPE. 



LINCOLN PLACER CO.CAL.&L 



*£\358 MARKET ST. S.F. 




D. N. & O. A. HAWLEY, 

501 to SOI IWAUKKT ITRRrT-San Francisco 



WANTED. 

A 2 -Year-Old 

THOROUGHBRED DURHAM BULL. 

State price to F., "Rural Press" Office. 



Dewey & Co. W^t 1 Patent Ag'ts 



The Only Perfect Insect Bradicator 

IS THE 

CLIMAX SPRAY PUMP. 

F r all kinds of Fruit Trees. Vines, Shrub', and all 
plants la any way infested with injects. A galvanized 
iron can. Capacity, 6 gallon*! 6 feet best lubber hoso. 
Brass pump with only metal valves that cannot 1 e affe t- 
cd by chemica's, while the Climax Cyclone Spray Nozzle 
has no equal as a sprayer. 

TbH Pump has been recommended as superior to all 
others by S. F. Chapin, State Inspector of Fruit; C A. 
Wetmore, of the Vitlcultural Society; A. T. Hatch, of 
Sonoma; and over 800 others who have made a personal 
trial of and are using this Pump. For sale by generil 
dealers in Hardware, Seedsmen, and at the office of the 
CAL. FIRE APPARATUS MFG CO., 
211 &«13 California St., San Francisco. 
JAS. S. NA1SMITH, Manager. 




RAMS FOR SALE. 

200 THOROUGHBRED 
And Qraded 

SPANISH MERINO 

Rams for Sale. 

Bred from the first, minor 
tations of Spanish Merino 
Sheep to California, iu 1854. 
horoughbred and High-tirade Ewes for sale. Prices 
reasonable. Residence, une mile north of McConnell's 
Station, Western Pacific Division C. P. K. R. P. O. address 
MRS. B. McCONNELL WILSON. 

Elk Grove, Sacramento Co., Cal, 

WINE 

Should send for our N KW CDCC 
1885 Catalogue, mailed^ ntfc. 

Boomer & Boschert Press 
Company, Syracuse, N. Y. 



MAKERS 



This paper is printed with Ink Manufac- 
tured by Charles Eneu Johnson & Co., 600 
South 10th St., Philadelphia. Branch Offi- 
ces 47 Rose St., New York, and 40 La Salle 
St., Chicago. Agent for the Pacific Coast- 
Joseph H. Dorety, 520 Commercial St. S. F 



18 



f ACIFI6 RURALo f RESS. 



[Joly 4, 1885 



Copissiop flerchapts. 



CHRISTY & WISE, 

AGENTS Full 

WOOL GROWERS 

AND 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

FOR THE SALE OF 

Wool, Hides, Tallow, Grain, Live 
Stock, etc. 

A Large Supply of Bucks Constantly on 
Hand. Also, Wool Bags, Twine, Dips, 
and all Ranch Supplies, fur- 
nished customers at 
Lowest Rates. 

OFFICE AND WAREHOUSE : 

N. E cor. Fifth and Townsend Sts., S. F. 

tiW Long experience warrants us in promising satis- 
factory results. 

tSTVi'c are always prepared to make liberal advances 
on Wool at lowest rates of interest. 

MOORE, FERGUSON & CO., 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

WOOL, GRAIN, FLOUR, 

ETC., ETC. 
Members of the San Francisco Produce Exchange 

810 Calllornia St., San Francisco. 
tif Liberal advances made on consignments. 



Geo. Morrow. [Established 1854 ] (J eo. P. Morrow. 

GEORGE MORROW & CO., 

HAY and GRAIN 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

39 Clay Street and 28 Commercial Street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
tig' SHIPPING ORDERS A SPECIALTY. "Si 



Jackson Hart. 



JAMKS P. Hl'LMK, 



WOOL, GRAIN 

AND 

General Commission Merchants, 

10 DAVIS ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

gST Personal attention given to all sales, and liberal 
advances made on consignments at low rates of interest. 
A 11 orders/or ranch supplies filled a t the lowest market 
rates. 

REMOVAL. 

DALTON BROS.. 

Commission Merchants 

AND DIALERS IN 

CALIFORNIA AND OREGON PRODUCE, 

GREEN AND DRIED FRUITS, 

Grain, Wool, Hides, Beans, and Potatoes. 

308 and 310 DAVIS ST., 
P. 0. Box 1938. SAN FRANCISCO 

tr CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. -» 

Grangers' Business Association, 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION HOUSE, 



No. 38 California St., 



San Francisco 



Consignments of GRAIN, WOOL, DAIRY PRODUCE, 
Dried Fruit, Live Stock, etc., solicited, and liberal ad- 
vances made on the same. 

Careful and prompt attention paid to orders for the 
purchasing of Grain and Wool SackB, Wagons, Agricult- 
ural Implements, Provisions, Merchandise, and supplies 
of all kinds. 

Warehouse and Wharf: 

At "THE GRANGERS'," Contra Costa Co 

Grain received on storage, for shipment, for sale on 
onnsignmcnt. Insurance effected and liberal advances 
made at lowest rates. Farmer* may rely on their grain 
being closely and carefully weighed, and on having their 
other interests faithfully attended to. 



I'KTKR MKTKR. 



LOUIS MBYKh 



MEYER BROS. & CO., 

Importers and 

Wholesale Grocers 

And Dealers in 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS. "» 

412 FRONT STREET. 

Front St. Block, bet. Clay & Washing-ton, San Franotsoq 
U'BjX'ii&l attention glvon to country trade* 
P. O, BOX 1940. 



LAND CLEARIN G WITH JUD SON POWDER. 

RAILROAD MEN, FARMERS AND VITIOULTURISTS HAVE, 

by practical experience, found that the JUDSON POWDER especially, is the best adapted to REMOYE 

STUMPS and TREES. 

FROM 5 TO 20 POUNDS OF THIS POWDER will always bring any sized stump or tree with 

roots clear out of the ground. The EXPENSE IS LESS THAN ONE-HALF the cost of Grubbing. 

In most instances, Giant Powder, or any other "High Explosive," is too uick, and ordinary Blasting Powder 
not strong enough. 

£S~Foi particulars how to use the same, apply to 

BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., General Agents 

GIANT POWDER COMPANY, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



MERY'S IMPROVED PIONEER 




BARLEY CRUSHER 

Using the Benoit Corrugated Rollers. 



» STILL AT THE FRONT! 




This Mill has been In use on this Coast for 6 years, 

TAKEN THE PREMIUM AT THE STATE FAIR 



wars in sue 



ssion, ami has met with general favor, 
there now being 



OVER 175 OF THEM IN USE IN CALIFORNIA! 

It is the most economical and durable Feed Mill in use. I am sole manu- 
facturer of the Corrugated Holler Mill. The Mi'ls are all ready to mount 

on wagons. 

I thank the public for the kind patronage received t tin- far, and hope fur a continuance of the same. 

2VC. L. MERY, CHICO IRON WORKS, Chico. Oivl. 




CALIFORNIA 

Wine andCider Press 



Was awarded FIRST PREMIUM at all 
Fairs throughout this State wherever 
exhibited during the season of 1*84, in- 
cluding a silver medal at the Mechanics' 
Fair of San Fiancisco. Also the highest 
premium at the California State Agri- 
cultural Fair. Address 

HENRY TYACK, 

31 Ninth St., San Francisco., 

Where o-e of the Presses can be seen. 

This Press weighs about 1150 ft*., is 
easily operated, extremely powerful, 
and is in general use throughout this 
St.it i . 

Circulars and price sent on applica- 
tion. 



Booth's Sure Death Squirrel Poison 

For Squirrels, Gophers, Birds, Mice, Etc. 

£9~Endorsed by the Grange and Fam.:rj wherever ->l 
The Cheapest and Best. 
Put up in 1-pound, 5-pound, and 5-gallon tint. 
Every Can Warranted. 

This Poison has been on the market less than two years, yet 
in this short time it has gained a reputation of "Sure Death," 
equaled by none. By its merits alone, with very little advertising, 
it is now used extensively all over the l*acific Coast, as W3ll as in 
Australia and New Zealand. 

SEND FOR TESTIMONIALS. 




MANUKACTTRKD BY 



Patented Jan 23d, 18(3. 
For Sale hv all Wholesale and Retail Dealers 



A. R. BOOTH, San Louis Obispo, Cal. 



Special Terms on Quantities inBulk. 



PACIFIC MACHINERY DEPOT. 

H. P. GREGORY & CO., 

a dt 4 California St., San Francisco, 

Importers and Dealers in all kinds of 

MACHINERY. 

ENGINES AND BOILERS 

On Hand from 2 to 100 II. P. 



Threshing Engines. 

Pumps of all kinds, from the 

ORCHARD SPRAYING PUMPS 

To the Largest Class of . 

IRRIGATING PUMPS. 
Saw-Mills, Wood and Iron Work- 
ing Machinery. 

THE EQUITABLE GAS MACHINE. 

Something that every farmer onght to have in his 
house. Cheaper than Kerosene or Candles. Safe, 
Simple, and Efficient. 

43TSKXD FOR DSKCRllTIVK CATAU 01 K. 



POWELL'S PAT. DERRICK 

-A-Micl STots. 
Indispensable to be a Successful Farmer. 




OVER 5,000 IN USE ! 

Fully Guaranteed in every particular or no sale. Never 
had a rig returned. Do not question the merits of this 
machine, but order at once of 

THOMAS POWELL, 

Patentee and Manufacturer, 

Stockton. Cai. 



WORTH'S IMPROVED 

Combined Toggle Lever and Screw Press. 

I desire to call the 
attention of Wine and 
Cider makers to my 
Improved Press. 
With this Press the 
movement of the fol- 
lower is fast at the 
commencement, mov- 
ing one and a half 
inches with one turn 
of the screw. The last 
turn of the screw 
moves the follower 
one-sixteenth of an 
inch. The follower 
has an up and down 
movement of 261 
inches, with the 
double platform run on a railroad track. You can have 
two curbs, by which you can fill one while the other is 
under the press, thereby doing double the amount of 
worit of any other press in the market. I also manufac- 
ture Horse Powers for all purposes, Ensilage Cutters, 
Plum Fitters, Worth's System of Heating Dairies by hot 
water circulation. tifSenii for a Circular. W. H. 
WORTH, Petaluma Foundry and Machine Works, 
Petaluma, Sonoma Co., Cal. 




MRS. E. E. KELSEY 

Practical Dress and Cloak Maker, 

CUT BY THE S. T. TAYLOR SYSTEM. 

ALSO, PATTERNS CUT TO ORDKR. 

Three Doors South of Poetnfflce, BERKELEY, CAL. 



McLEAN'S GRAIN-SAVING ATTACHMENT. 




Out Representing McLean's Graln-Savln* Attachment as 



appears when attached to a Separator. 



THESE ATTACHMENTS 

AKE 

Guaranteed 

TO 

SAVE GRAIN 

ON 

Any Separator, 

No matter what make or 
how much improved 
it may be. 

*r K"i further informa- 
tion, prices, etc., addreBa 

n. Mclean, 

Watsonville, Cal, 



Joly 4, 1885.] 



fACIFie I^URAb f RESS. 



19 



fieed?, Wapts, ttc. 



LEONARD COATES. 



S. M. TOOL. 



NAPA VALLEY 

NURSERIES 

COATES & TOOL, Prop'rs. 

For Season of 1885-86 

We offer a splendid assortment of 

FRUIT TREES AND GENERAL 
NURSERY STOCK. 

OUR LEADING SPECIALTY WILL BE: 

THE 

"CENTENNIAL" CHERRY, 

A California Seedling of Napoleon Bigar- 
reau, fruited first in 1876, and now 
for the first time offered 
for sale. 

The "Centennial" Cherry resembles the Napoleon in 
color, but is nearly one-third larger, the seed is much 
smaller, and it is so fiim that it will stand shipping to 
almost any part of the United States. It is known and 
recommended by all the leading horticulturists who have 
seen it. A. T. Hatch, Esq. , of Suisun, the well known 
fruit grower, and Vice-President of the California Horti- 
cultural Society, says, after seeing the fruit on the trees, 
and thoroughly testing it: "It far exceeds my highest 
expectations; it could not be better, and is all and more 
than you claim for it. " Full particulars on application. 

ALSO 

500,000 ROOTED RESISTANT 
GRAPEVINE STOCKS 

AT LOW RATES. 

PR^SPARTURIENS WALNUT, 

In bearing in our Orchard at 3 years old. 

"Muir" Peach, Glaister Plum, Marshall's 
Seedling, or Red Bellflower Apple, 

And other noted fruits, etc. 4®"Send for Catalogue. 

COATES & TOOL, 

Napa City, Cal. 

N. B.— A few good Agents wanted to can- 
vass for us. C & T. 

ROSENDAHL'S NURSERY, 

Washington Co'ony, Fresno, Cal. 

200,000 Fruit Trees and Vines 

Or ALL KINDS. 

Particulars on application. Lowest rate i to the trade. 
Address C. P. WALTON. Sole Agent. 

Box 570, Fresno, Cal. 




AUTOMATIC E N CINE 



1,300 Engines now in use. 
40,000 Horse Power now running. 
Sales 2,000 H. P. per month. 

farScml for Illustrated Circu'ar and Reference List. 

PARKE & LACY, 

Sole Agents for Pacific Coast & Territories, 
21 and 23 Fremont St., San Francisco. 



SECOND HAND SEPARATOR 

For Sale at a Bargain. 

A 35-Inch Buffalo Pitts Separator 

With Jackson's Self- Feeder. 

Has bpen used about 60 days. Apply to 

p. HORTOP & CO., 

Rutherford, Napa Co,, Cal. 

Or to D. N. k 0. A. H.»\vt.i:v. No- Ml Market Street 
Han Francisco, 



?eed$, MaM, ttc. Seeds, Hants, ttc. 



If You Want to Save Money and avoid a life of trouble, buy Trees Free from Scale. 

. ■ 



03 
O 

£ 

C9 



W. M. WILLIAMS' 

SEMI-TROPICAL and GENERAL NURSERIES. 

375,000 TREES. 1,000,000 ROOTED VINES. 

FOR THE SEASON OF 1884-85. 



Apples, Pears, Peaches, Apricots, Nectarines, French and Hungarian Prunes, Plums, Figs 
and Cherries. Cypress, Gums, Acacias, Ornamental Shrubs, Greenhouse Plants. 

3,000 of the Genuine Smyrna Fig, imported from the Mediterranean, and proven in Cali- 
fornia this season. Sixty varieties of Grapes, rooted and cuttings, including all the best Wine 
and Raisin varieties. Catalogue free. 

•W. JVL. X\7"XT«T.IATVi:i5t, 

Fresno, California. 



P. O. BOX 175. 





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Kieffer's Hybrid, Le Conte and P. Barry Pears, at Reasonable Prices. 



SEEDS 



ALBERT DICKINSON 

DEALER IN 

Timothy, Clcer, Flax, Hungarian, Millet, Red lop s 
Blue Grass, Lawn flrass, Or;hard Grass, Bird Seeds, 4c, 
POP CORN. 

Office, 115 Kinzie St., 

noi, 106, 108 & no Michigan St. CHICAGO. ILL 



WAREHOUSES 
»S, 117 & 119 Kinzie St 



ALL ABOUT FIGS. 



THE WHITE ADRIATIC, 



SAN PEDRO, 



WHITE GENOA. 



esr Send for New Descriptive Circular.*®* 
GUSTAV EISEN (FANCHER CREEK NURSERY), FRESNO, CAL. 




Washington Navel 

ORANGrES 

EUREKA LEMONS. 



SEND FOR PRICES. 



Will also contract to bud 
special varieties for future 
delivery in quantities to suit. 

Address : 
BYRON O. CLARK and 

RIGGINS BROS.. 
Box 88, Pasadena, Cal. 




S. W. Corner Kearny and Montgomery Avenue, San Francisco. 

Free Coach to and from the House. J. W. BECKER. Proprietor. 



KELSEY HOUSE, 

OAKLAND, CAL. 

This large and well-known villa has been leased by C. C. Wheeler, of the Winsor. It has 
been thoroughly renovated throughout. The House and Cottages are situated on large and 
beautiful grounds. The Billiard and Reading Rooms have been handsomely fitted up for ladies 
and gentlemen. In close proximity is the Perry Seminary for young ladies, the Sackett School, 
the MiBses Field's Home School for Young Ladies, California Military Academy, Hopkins' 
Academy, Pagoda Hill Kindergarten, and many other Schools. Cars pass the House every 
seven minutes from Broadway Station to State University. Ten minutes from Broadway and 
forty minutes from San Francisco. Special rates to regular boarders and families. Telephone 
communications to local points free. 

C. C. WHEELER, Proprietor. 



ZIMMERMAN 



EVAPORATOR 



M a uaivanUoiJIror] FIVK *I«§5*, I3.0WO sol o K«>B»mlf»l, Durable ami rira , 

Proof. Will pay loritHplf in :«> days use, out of sale of 1 IB own pro :u«t». Fit kk ! <'ur Illustrated 1 
Catalogue and Treatise, Address, Jlliai I I \« 'OKI 'll. J»»u l'rnaei»eo. California. 

or Pacific Fruit Co., Sacramento. F. H. Page, 120 Front St., Portland. Or. 



DEWEY & gO., : {X^Al^nt bT '} PATENT AGENTS. 



MONAhOM CAH H R^So 
IOTONS BOX CAR £600 

MONARCH JRo«oi U A«y.i L tsS5CO 

0**P- ISTMEBtSTSM 
BALE CA R PRESS IM1 
. 'WORL 




THE MONARCH 

— AND — 

JUNIOR MONARCH 



Hay Presses 



(Patented July 22nd, 1884.) 

NO TRAMPING REQUIRED ! 

Parties who think of buying Hay Presses the present 
season, should not fail to send for circulars of the above 
machines, which are destined in a short time to super- 
sede all other baling machines. 

The first named, the MONARCH, is intended for 
making those small bales for loading box cars with ten 
tons. It is the only Press made that will do this, without 
crushing, grinding, or otherwise damaging the hay. Its 
bales are known in the San Francisco market as the 
three-quarter bales, and they bring from one to two dol- 
lars per ton more in that city than those bales which are 
tied endwise. The MONARCH is fed in large charges 
(two or more forkfuls) and the bales are pressed and tied 
sidewise, like the large common bales, which explains 
why the bav is not crushed or damaged. 

The JUNIOR MONARCH is just about the size 
of my Petaluma Hay Press, and makes a similar bale,, 
but it can be run by two men, and does its own tramp- 
ing, and is one-third faster than the Petaluma. The bales 
can be made 50 pounds heavier than Petaluma bales. 

The wooden levers used last year are replaced with 
wrought-iron ones, and the action of the feed door has, 
been greatly improved. 

A remarkable improvement, which is called 

THE IMPROVED AUTOMATIC HORSE POWER 

Has been applied to both the Monarch and the Junior 
Monarch presses this season (18SS). Heretofore the de- 
scent of the follower, after each charge, has been gov- 
erned by a brake on the horse-power operated by the 
driver Now, by means of a compact, solid little attach- 
ment, weighing but 40 pounds, the descent of the fol- 
lower is controlled in the most perfect manner without 
the attention of anybody, thus saving the labor of one 
man. The action of this improvement (which though 
very simple, is not easily explained on paper,) is really 
very extraordinary. 
Price of Monarch. - $600 
Price of Junior Monarch, - - $500 
Genuine Price or Petaluma Presses made of clear, 
sound White oak, and with Norway iron chains, at 
greatly reduced rates, an I as low as the bogus affairs. 

Address : JACOB PRICE, San Leandro, Cal. 
Inventor of the Monarch, Junior Monarch, Petaluma, 
Wizard, Climax and Eagle Baling Presses. 



CAMPTOKT'S 




SELF-OPENING AND CLOSING 

AUTOMATIC GATE. 

For simplicity and durability it is the only reliable 
Gate now in use. No complex machinery about it. By 
a simple lever it is thrown off the center of gravity, and 
opens and closes itself by its own weight. A child six 
years old can open and close it sitting in a buggy. 

It is TBI Gatk when driving a skittish horse or young 
colt, or when ladies do their own driving. No Fancy 
Residence should be without them, and every Farmer 
should have them where there is a Gate used! He will 
save time, besides taking the chances of his team leaving 
him while closing the old common Gate. 

These Gates are almost as cheap as any common Farm 
Gate. They are durable, never get out of order, and will 
last a lifetime. 

Send for Circular giving references and Price List 
Address JOHN AYLWARD. 

P. O. Box 88. Livermore, Alameda Co., Cal. 

Or JAMES STANLEY, Mission San Jose, Cal. 

County Rights for sale, apply to John Aylward. 



EXCELSIOR FRUIT FITTER 




PITTING 

PLUMS, 
APRICOTS, 

NECTARINES, 

Etc , Etc. 

O" Send for Cikcl UAM 
and Piucks. 

WIESTER & CO., 

17 New Montgomery St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



COMMERCIAL HOTEL, 

A. & J. HAHN, Prop'rs, 
Nos. 273, 275, 277 and 279 Main Streot, STOCKTON, Cal. 
Kates, $1.35 to $2 Per Day. 
Stago offices for Colleeeville and Oakdale, Roberts and 
Union Islands, and Lane's Mineral Springs stages. The 
moat desirable location In tho city. Refurnished and refit 
tod In tho best style for tho accommodation of the public, 
Free couch from all traim and steamboats to the hotel. 



20 



f ACIFI6 I^URAb PRESS. 



[Joly 4, 1885 



ENRIGHT'S PATENT STRAW-BURNING 

PORTABLE THRESHING ENGINE 

FOR XSBS 

IS THE MOST SUCCESSFUL, ECONOMICAL, COMPACT, AND RELIABLE PORTABLE STRAW-BURNING ENGINE ON THIS COAST. 



The following are a few of the TESTIMOMIALS Recently Received from Purchasers of my Engine 



Arlington Farm, Pavisvillk, Mar. 24, 1884 
Joseph Knright— Drar Sir: Your letter, written so long 
ago, had been misplaced anil only on yesterday was brought 
to my notice. I hope 1 will not be too late for the purpose 
for which you desired my statement. 1 can only say that 
your new style Knright water grates and fire wall, as placed 
in mv engine last season, gave me complete satisfaction. I 
found them to be of immense advantage in the rapid genera- 
tion of steam. They are wonderful improvements over the 
old style of grate bars, as they never heat through, nor are 
"clinkers" formed upon them. I cheerfully recommend them 
to all threshing men. Yours truly, H. M. LaRUB, 

Farmer, Sacramento, Speaker of the Assembly and ex- 
President of the State Agricultural Society. 



PATENTED 
JS/Lny T, 1878, 

. ..AND.... 

3VE«.y 17, X88X. 



Mountain View, Mar. 25, 1884. 
Joseph Knright-DK*R Sir: The engine which we bought 
of you gave the best of satisfaction and cannot be beat. I 
have been in the threshing business for many years, and alsn 
handling engines, but yours be its any that I have ever 
handled. I recommend it to be the best in the world, except- 
ing none. Yours truly, THORNBEKOER & DONAHUE. 



BiNon.oiroN, Mar. 6, 1884. 
Joseph Knright— Vkkr Sir: Yours of Feb. 28th isreoeived, 
asking how I liked the engine you sold me last year, and in 
reply I would say that your engine gave perfect satisfaction 
in everv respect. It did all that you claimed for it. I do not 
want any better engine. EL H McKINSTKY. 

Rosrvillk, Jul] 17, 1883. 
Joseph Knright -Dkar Sir: 1 take pleasure in stating 
that the engine I b>ught from you this season is all that 
t was recommended to he, and am well pleased with the way 
it moves everything that I attach to it. It moves oft very 
smooth and easy in every way, and hauls one horse easier j 
than the one I had last y ear, on account of its wide tire in m 
soft ground. I am also much pleased witn your patent oil HI 
cups, as they do nut require so much attention in oiling, and, ^3 
in fact, I think it is the most complete field engine that I ever 
saw at work. ReBtectfulh yours, GOULD BROS. 

Bisohaihtox, March 0, 1884. I 
Joseph Knright —Dkar Sir: In regard to your inquiry, the engine we bought of you last season, works to 
perfection. We had no trouble in keeping up steam; it gave all the power we needed to run a 40 inch separator 
a nd grain cleaner and derrick fork hoist. I can with confidence reron. mend it to any one who intends buvi.-.g an I 
nginc. Yours truly, F. R. DODGE & SON. | 



St. Joints, Colusa Co., Cal., Mar. 8, 1884. 
Ji*seph Knright. — Dear Sir: In answer to your request 
asking how I liked your engine I bought last year, I would 
say that I liked it well, and am well pleased with it. I took 
it out in the field just as it came from your shop, and com- 
menced threshing with a 40-inch Pitt's separator, and ran 80 
days, and never lost five minutes during the whole run, 
whether for repairs or steam. I believe it would pull another 
thresher, it runs so light and easy. One hundred pounds is 
the most 1 ever used, and that only in the morning, while it 
is damp. Ninety pounds is enough in any ordinary dry 
threshing. It is no trouble to Ore; a boy can fire it, it steams 
so easy. I can start a fire in the morning and he threshing In 
twenty -five minutes with ease, and not only that, but every- 
thing seems to be in proportion and well put together, and 
runs like a new buggy wheel. I will venture to say that the 
expense'of repairing my engine this spring will not exceed 
and I would suggest to all threshing nun in need of an 
engine, to buy one of your 9x20, the same as I have, for I 
feel confident that they are going to be the leading engines in 
the harvest fields of California. Yours respectfully, 

JAMES Q. DEVENEY. 

Davihville, Mar. 15, 1884. 
Joseph Knright -Dkak Sir: I feel under many obligations 
to vou for the engine you sent me last June. It filled the 
bill, and 1 found it better than you even told me it was. I 
found no straw that I could not make all the steam with I 
needed to run a 40-inch Bronson Pitt's thresher and Nash & 
Outt's cleaner; attached, also, Jackson's feeder with long olc- 
vator. Your water grates I think a success and a help in 
raising steam. Yours respectfully, B. J. GUTHRIE. 

Hanford, Tulare Co., July 16, 1882. 
Jmeph Knright— Dear Sir: I take pleasure in certifying 
that I used, the past season, a 20 horse power steam thresh- 
ing engine, of Mr. Joseph Enright's patent, and that the same 
is very easy to fire, and giving me ample power to run a 40- 
inch separator. That I ran the engine 102 days, new from the 
shop, without having to expend one cent for repairs, and I 
hereby assert that I do not think there can be any better 
engine made for threshing purposes. 

NELSON ARCHIBALD. 

Saunas Citv, Monterey Co., Feb. 1, 1882. 

Joseph Knright— Dear Sir: The engine I purchased fro.n you in 1881 gave me very great satisfaction. I 
never had any trouble with it whatever, and it fired easier than any engine I ever saw, besides having any amount 
of power Yours, very respectfully, MICHAEL LYNN. 




■W I T IX 



IPd/tent "Water Bridge Wall and Water Grates, 

TOOK r»DFLDE31VtIXJlVt AT STATE FAIR, 1882 and 1888. 

Address all Communications to TDR'FI'PT-T TT!T\] RTH-TTT San Jose, California. 



HEALD'S 

AGRICULTURAL WORKS, 

JOHN Li. HEALD, Proprietor, 
Crockett, Contra Costa Co., Cal., 

MAX! hAC'TL'REK OI 

HEALD'S PATENT 

Wine Making Machinery. 

. THIS 

Is the only machinery that has given universal satisfac- 
tion, and is to be f und in all the first-class Wine ''ellars 
in the State. The Patent Crushers, Stemmers, and FU- 
vators, includes the elevation of grapes in boxes as well 
as loose. Ca|iacity of large Crusher and Steminer up to 
15 tons per hour. Hand ' Crushers, or Crushers and 
Stemmers that can be worked by hand, horse, or steam 
power to a capacity of 10 to 30 tons per day. 

My Hydraulic Wine Press has a <ai acit> of four times 
that of any other press in the market, and will save from 
to 83 worth of wine at e»oh pressing over all others 
Wine-makers cannot afford to use any other press if they 
desire to save money in wine and labor. Wine Pomps, 
Pomace Cars, or any other appliance needed in a Wine 
Cellar, such as Boilers, Engines, Shafting, Pulleys, etc., 
new or second-hand, for sile at lowest prices. Plans and 
specifications for Wine Cul'ars furnished at lowest tigur. s 

If you want the best Irrigation or Drainaire Pump, call for 
one of "J. L. Heald's Centrifugal." guaranteed to 
pump water at a cost not to exceed So cents per acre for 
irrigation, which is much cheaper than ditch water, and 
is the only Centrifugal Pump that can be run by horse 
power. 

Get one of "Heald's Harley Crushers" if \ou 
want the best in the market. Capacity up to 10 tons per 
hoar. It took the first premium at State Fair, 1884. 

II. al l . Patent Straw-Burning; Engine has 

proved itself for years to he the best, and took first pre- 
mium at State Fair, 18S4. 

Heald's Patent Steam Engine Governor has 
given entire satisfaction wherever used, in addifg lii per 
cent more power to the Engine, and, with speeder attach- 
ment, enables the Engine to run at any speed required, 
with the utmost regularity. This governor will main- 
tain the same speed under varying pressure or load. 



1885. 



1885. 



Mission Rock Grain Dock and Warehouses, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Regular Warehouse for S. F. Produce Exchange Call Board. 

Storage Capacity for 75.000 Tons of Grain. 

THE CALIFORNIA DRY DO0K CO., Proprietors. 



OLIVER ELDRIDGE, Pres., 



CHAS. H. SINCLAIR, Supt., 



W. C. GIBBS, Sec). 



Freight paid, fire insurance and loans effected, and proceeds forwarded free of commission-'. Money advance 1 at 
lowest rates on grain in warehouse, interest payable at end of loan. Storage season, ending June 1, 1SHB, at reduced 
rates. On all wheat shipped to Mission Rock by barges, freight tatos guaranteed the same as to Port Costa. Alt 
applications for storage or other business addressed to CH AS- H SINCLAIR, Superintendent. 

OFFICE, 3X8 California St., Xloom 3. 



-A.. AITK.EN, 

PREMU'M PIONEER 

Marble and Granite Works, 

617 K Street, bet. 6th and 7th, 
SACRAMENTO, CAL. 

Monuments. Tomb and Grave Stones. 

MANTELS, Etc. 

All kinds of work done in Italian and Vermont Marble 
liiieet importers of Scotch Granite Monuments and 
Marbleized Slate Mantels. 
Orders filled for Buckhont's Patent Hot- Air Grates. 



AGENTS 



WASTED for DR. SCOTT'S 

> beautiful Electric Cor9etS. Sam- 
ple free to those becoming agents. No 
risk.nuick sales. Territory given.saiisfaction guaranteed 
Addon. DR. SCOTT, 842 Broadway St., N. 



V. 



MUSIC BOOKS 

For 8choola and Sunday Schools. Temper- 
ance, Musical and other Meetings and 
Institutes. For all. Dltscn & Co , 
publish very superior New 
Music Books. 

That most successful 
Sunday School Song 
Book, Sour; Worsnlp(8i i ts ) by Enrrson .V Sherwiu, 
and a'so the perfectly charming Picture Song Book for 
Infant Classes, Fresh Flowers (26 cts ) by Eu.ma 

unrivalled Sonar 
. . ting (80 <1_., 
Good Instructions, ami the best of Part 



For Sunday Schools 



Pitt. 



For High Schools. Slreeti-eceo^.) w e 



O. Fmerson 
Song 



For Common Schools. 



For Primary Schools. 



The well-known and 
favorite collection of 
Suhool Songs, Song Bells (SO cts ) by u. 0. Emerson. 

The best of little 
Song Hooka, gay 
with pictures, and sweet with nice poetry and music, 
f< ems for Little Singer 8 (30 cts.) by Emerson and 

ready, Klnder- 
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For Kindergartens ,„..,. 

Boards, $1.25; Cloth, jl.50. 



For Piano Players. 



A very superior book of 
piftBO pleC©9, Piano 
Classics, $1.50 ClotV, $1.00 B Kirds. Also, just ready, 
K'-aves of Shamrock, a ohofci collection of the 
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*t*7"Any Book Mailed for the Retail Price. 



OLIVER DITSON & CO.. Boston. 



C. H. DITSON & CO.. 



86" Broadway, Nrw York. 



For the BEST HONEY EXTRACTOR 

OR 

BEST WAX EXTRACTOR, 
Or Supplies for the Apiary, 

8K.N0 TO 

J. D. EN as ... Napa, Cal. 

AND SATE TIMS AND rSKIOIIT. 



Sedgwick s ™ E Fence 




Is the best general purpose wire fence in use. 
It is a atrontc net-work without barb*. 

Don't Injure slock. R " 111 turn doss, pigs, sheep, 
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Kallroads. Very neat, pretty styles for Lawns, 
Parks. School-lots, and Cemeteries. Covered with 
rust-proof paint, or made of galvanized wire, as 
preferred, 't will last a life time. It is better 
than boards or burbed wire In every respect. 
Give it a fair trial ; il will wear itself Into favor. 
The Sedirn ick <Jnies made of wrought iron 
pipe and steel wire, defy ull competition in light- 
ness, neatness, strength, and durability, we 
make the best, cheapest, and easiest working 
nil-iron automatic <<r -i it-opcnifig ante, 
and the nea-ti'Mi cheap iron fences now 
made. The Boss folding poultry coup is a 
late and useful Invention. The best Wire 
Streteher, Cutting- Pliers, and Host An- 
g-erss. We also manufacture Russell's excel- 
lent Wind Engines for pumping, and Geared 
Engines for grind ng, etc. For prices and particulars 
ask Hardware Dealers, i j i n >■ ■ meutloDlnp paper, 

SEDGWICK I1UO*., Richmond. Ind. 



MONARCH CAR PRESS 

10 TONS BOX CAR 1 600 

MONARCH JR css sVisSMO 
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WORLD* 




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SENT ON TRIAL I 
Puts 10 Tons in a Box Car. Trice, $600 00 

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Greatly Improved. Prick, $500 00 

E &GLE HAY PRESS. $250 00 
CLIMAX HAY PRESS, $300 OO. 
PETALUMA HAY PRESS, with Kastern Oak 

wood, Norway iron chains, Truss on top door, Iron 

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HOP PRESSES, m to S500. 

M AM'KACTl'KlD BT 1IIR 

San Leandro Manufacturing Co,, 

411 Mission St., San Francisco. 
Address TRUMAN, ISHAM & CO.. 

8an Francisco. Cal 



INDIANAPOLIS 

CHAIR MANUFACTURING CO, 

This old and reliable Arm is now located at theli 
New Building, 
N amber 7S0 Mission Street, San Francisco 
This immense structure is 50x160 feet, four stories and 
basement. The first and second stories are used as sale- 
rooms for a new and select class of goods of latest designs 
and patterns. Parties wishing to furnish a house will save 
from 16 to 26 per cent by purchasing their goods here 



Wheeler Patent Cannery, 

MADE OF ALL SIZES. 

The Safest, Quickest, and Highest 
Endorsed 

Of all appliances for the cooking of hermetically sealed 
goods, rieserting Fruits in Glass as safely nd 
as well as In Tin. 

No Orchaidist Should he Without One 

THE WHEELER FRUIT JAR. 

The Finest Appearing, the Safest and 
Most Convenient ever Introduced 
to the Public. 



£7itr.RD for Circulars. 

WHEELER FRUIT PACKING CO., 

312 Sacramento Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




Vol. XXX— No. 2.] 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1885. 



$3 a Year, in Advance 

Single Copikh, 10 Ctm. 



The Desert and its Beasts of Burden. 

The conception of a desert which arises in the 
minds of many young and untraveled persons is 
often that of a sea of sand, an almost limitless 
area of dead-level, a waste or expanse where 
one sees no landmarks, as in mid-ocean he sees 
no land. This idea of a desert is, of course, 
wrong, for in fact there are hills and vales and 



ever, which has always been associated with 
the charming mysteries of the caravan trade of 
the deserts of Asia and Africa or as the faithful 
friend of some nomadic she'k, has in these 
later days become an adjunct of modern indus- 
try. In Nevada camels were introduced some 
years ago to draw heavy freight wagons across 
the wastes of sagebrush. Afterwards we heard 
of them as doing some service in connection 



General Lord Wolseley. The equipment of 
this unique cavalry service, without whose aid 
it would hardly have been possible for the di- 
visions of Gen. Earl and Oen. Stewart to have 
made their forced marches from Korti across 
the desert, the former toward Berber, and the 
latter to the Nile near Shendy. In these 
marches and the subsequent retreat even the 
endurance of the camel has been severely tried, 



Exhibits for Louisville.— The State Viti- 
cultural Commission will undertake to make an 
exhibit of California wines and raisins at the 
Louisville exhibitions to be held this fall. 
Committees have been appointed to act with C. 
B. Turrill of the railroad employ, as follows: 
To obtain wine exhibits -I. Landsberger, of 
San Francisco; Hon. M. M. Estee, of Napa 
('apt. .I.Chamon de St. Hubert, of San Jose; 




SHIPS OF THE DESERT AT ANCHOR.-Kro.n a picture by G. Rud. HUBS*. 



other diversities of surface in the desert as else- 
where and it would only require rainfall to 
change, in time, the marks of desolation for 
the beauties of the landscape such as we en joy 
who live in well watered regions. The artist 
in the engraving gives an idea of this topog- 
raphy of a desert in the faint lines which appear 
in the background of his picture. The man is 
sitting on a bluff overlooking a valley, which, 
were there water, might be filled with growths 
of trees and shrubs and meadow plants and the 
site of many happy homes. Without water it 
supports no growth and is but the abode of a 
few hardy reptiles. 

The main interest of the engraving centers in 
the peculiar beasts of burden which are shown 
and which even the children will recognize from 
their frequent appearance in their natural his- 
tories and books of travel. The camel, how- 



with the mining industry of Arizona. In 
pome parts of Australia they are put to farm 
work. The latest application of the camel 
to the promotion of modern ideas is their use 
by the British forces operating in Africa against 
the Soudanese. Along the upper Nile there 
are stretches of desert along both banks up to 
the great central African plateau. Long before 
the first cataract is reached at Assouan, five 
hundred miles above Cairo, these sterile wastes 
approach quite up to the river banks, and all 
travel over them is fraught with great labor 
and hardship. 

The difficulty of sending soldiers through 
such a region was the most serious matter which 
presented itself to the British Government in 
organizing its expedition for the relief of Khar- 
toum, and the idea of utilizing the service of 
camels, therefore, was promptly adopted by 



as it is quite a different thing to take a modern 
army over the Nubian or the Libyan desert 
from what it is for an Arab caravan to traverse 
these dreary wastes. The English soldiers have 
at length become familiar ivith the characteris- 
tics of their uncouth steeds, but it is said that 
the closer acquaintance has not increased their 
estimation of his character, and he is declared 
to be a sulky and troublesome beast, whoso use 
is a most disagreeable necessity. 



Raisin Pricks. — According to the Riverside 
Press, as high as six cents per pound for raisins 
in the sweat-box is being offered. The raisin 
crop of Riverside this year will reach fully 100,- 
000 boxes, and at f. cents per pound will net 
Riverside, in the sweat-box, $120,000; and the 
money paid for packing niil also be left there. 
This income will bo an average of $120 per acre. 



E. W. Maslin, of Sacramento; F. T. Eisen, of 
Fresno. To obtain raisin exhibits Rob't Mc- 
Pherson, of Orange, Los Angeles county; L. 
M. Holt, of Riverhide; (ieo. A. Cowles, of El 
Cajon, San Diego county; T. 0. White, of 
Fresno; Q, A. Jackson, of Woodland, Yolo 
county; Hon. J. A. Filcher, of Auburn, for 
foothill counties. The exhibits sent by this 
committee will not be for competition for prizes, 
but simply for sampling and general public in- 
struction. Those wishing to compete for 
priz.es will forward samples on their own ac- 
count to the proper officers of the exposition. 

A fine car for Palo Alto stock farm, made 
expressly for the transportation of blooded 
horses, has just been completed at the railroad 
shops in Sacramento. California horses have 
this year, earned the right to palace car' 



22 



f ACIFie RURAb f RESS. 



[Jolt 11, 1885 



The Honey Extractor and Its Use. 

Editors Press:— Wax is secreted by the bees 
from houey which they take into their system 
for that purpose, and it has been estimated that 
they consume from 15 to 25 pounds of honey in 
order to secrete one pound of wax. Wax is, 
therefore, a very expensive article, and, as it 
never brings a market piice commensurate with 
its original ccst, it was long a serious problem 
to bee-keepers, how to secure the honey with- 
out destroying the comh. The principle of the 
honey-extractor was finally discovered by an 
accident. I quote from au old paper the 
following description of the discovery: "In 
Italy there chanced to dwell one Major 
Von Hnischka, a Cerman, and one of 
nature's bee- keepers. One day Major Von 
Hruschka was in his apiary, and his son chanced 
to be there too. The boy carried a tin pail 
which had a string tied to it. The major gave 
the boy a piece of honey, putting it into the tin 
pail. Then the youth, boy-like, begun to swing 
the pail with the honey in ic around and around 
in a circle, holding it by the string. A moment 
after he had ceased this amusement, the major 
happened to look again at the piece of honey. 
What was his surprise to find that the honey 
was all drained out ne itly and perfectly from 
that side of the comb which had been on the 
outside of the circle, as the boy swung the pail 
around by the string. The major thoughtfully 
turned the comb over, and bade the boy swing 
again. This time the other side of the comb 
was all drained out, and that night Major Von 
Hruschka went to Ixd thiuking. He thought 
and thought and experimented till he gave bee- 
keepers the honey-extractor, which whirls the 
honey out of the comb by centrifugal force, 
leaving the comb to be filled again by the bees, 
and the liijuid honey clean, pure and beautiful, 
to be eaten by people." 

The First Extractor 
I owned, and probably the first style manufact- 
ured in America, had a revolving can. Inside 
of this were placed wire screens, against which 
the combs rested. It had the disadvantage that 
the honey would not leave the extractor while 
in motion, being held on the inner surface of 
the can by centrifugal force. It was no" long, 
however, before this was remedied. The ex- 
tractor of to-day consists of a stationary, out- 
side can or case, and a central, revolving reel, 
in which the combs are placed. The sides of 
the reel are formed of stout, coarse wire cloth, 
having about four meshes to the inch. On the 
inside of this wire cloth, ami resting against, 
the combs are placed. The motion is horizon- 
tal. Extractors in which the combs can be 
placed just as they hang in the hive, arc the 
most convenient. The frames can then .be 
lifted by their shoulders, and the operator does 
not get his fingers daubed with honey, which 
has to be washed off before he can touch any- 
thing else. 

Extractors are made to hold two, four, six or 
eight combs, according to the size of the apiary 
in which they are used. In order to avoid 
swinging and uneven wear of the'extractor, the 
combs should balance (be of the san.e weight) 
as nearly as possible. 

The Reel. 

Is generally placed so there will be room under it 
for more or lesshoney, and itis revolved either by 
crank, attached directly to the top of the shaft, 
or by gearing, which lessens the motion of the 
hand of the operator. At the bottom the 
extractor is provided with a honey gate, 
through which the honey can be drawn off when 
desired. When the combs are removed from 
the hive for the purpose of being extracted they 
should be nearly or wholly sealed over, to be 
sure that the honey is ripe. Some bee- keepers 
recommend taking the honey away before it is 
sealed, in order to save the labor of uncapping 
and afterwards evaporating the honey by arti- 
ficial means; but this is a very uncertain and 
questionable process, and will probably never 
equal the evaporation done by the bees. 

Hefore the combs are placed in the extractor 
the capping or sealing must be shaved off, which 
is called 

Uncapping. 

This is done with knives of a peculiar, 
trowel shaped pattern. Two honey-knives are 
required, as they must be kept in hot water 
and frequently changed, to keep them free from 
the honey adhering to them, and to make them 
cut easily. Honey-knives have been made 
which were claimed to work without heating, 
but they are not suitable for rapid work. Al- 
though many different styles of honey-knives 
are now offered for sale, there is no doubt that 
the "Bingham k Hetherington" pattern excels 
them all, both in workmanship and utility. 
The Uncapping Box. 

This is a large box, lined with tin or coated 
with wax, and closed with a tight fitting cover. 
Hirectly under the cover are two square strips 
of wood, with their ends resting in mortises in 
the ends of the box. ( >n these strips the comb 
(or frame) is placed edgewise, and while being 
supported by the left hand, the capping is 
shaved oil' and drops on a perforated tin plate, 
as large as, and placed three or four inches 
above, the bottom of the box. One of the 
strips should have u piece of tin tacked to it 
near the right-hand end, the tin projecting like 



the edge of a knife blade, on which the honey- 
knife may be scraped when bits of wax or thick 
honey adhere to it. At the bottom the uncap 
ping box is, like the extractor, provided with 
a honey guts. The honey which adheres to the 
the cappings or drips from the comb will drain 
through the perforated plate, and may be 
drawn off occasionally. Being virgin-honey, it 
can be put together with the extracted honey. 

After being uncapped, the combs are placed 
in the extractor and revolved, the centrifugal 
force throwing the honey from the outside of 
the combs through the wire cloth and against 
the sides of the extractor, from whence it Hows 
to the bottom. When one side is emptied the 
combs are turned, and the same process gone 
through with for the other side. The houey 
comes out in large drops or in a fine, spray, ac- 
cording to its thickness or body. This also de- 
termines the speed of the reel required, which 
varies from ISO to 200 revolutions in a minute. 
New and tender combs require more care and 
slower motion to prevent them from breaking or 
by the motion being forced into the wire cloth. 
It is sometimes ntcessary to turn them several 
times, extracting only part of the honey each 
time, as the weight of the honey on the inner 
or opposite side has a tendency to break them, 
particularly if they are not perfectly flat and 
straight. Combs built on foundation are tougher 
thin t those built altogether by the bees. Old 
•o-nbs which have been used for breeding will 
stand any amount of speed. The wire cloth on 
the reel supports the combs and prevents them 
from breaking out of the frames -during the 
motion. At the first extracting each season 
■.he combs will often be more or less uneven; 
but after they have once been trimmed with 
the honey-knife they will usually remain 
straight, if they are spaced right in the hive. 
If a comb is not in a perfect plane with the 
frame it may be cut partly loose and forced into 
place, after the honey has been extracted from 
it, and the bees will soon fasten it securely. It 
is well to have a lot of transferring-sticks 
handy, to put on to any comb which breaks or 
cracks, and is liable to fall out of the frame. 
The sticks may be taken off in a couple of days 
or at the next extracting. 

The honey should be drawn from the extrac- 
tor as fast as necessary, that it may not inter- 
fere with the motion of the reel, and poured 
into the 

Honey Tank. 
As the honey will be mixed with air when it 
comes from the extractor, a thick froth will 
rise to the top in the tank, and must be 
skimmed off when the tank is full. To prevent 
bits of wax, bees, flies and dust from getting 
into the honey, I use a strainer made of cheese- 
cloth, sewed to a hoop, which tits the top of the 
tank. Once or twice a day the strainer must 
be cleaned, which is easily done by laying it in 
a tub of water, which soon dissolves the honey 
sticking to the cloth, and by pouriug a stream 
of water on both sides of the cloth, all particles 
of honey and wax are washed off in a moment. 
The honey tank should be placed on a stool or 
bench so high that a honey can on a pair 
of scales may be placed under the honey gate, 
thus allowing the bee keeper to put any desired 
weight into each can whilo it is being rilled. 

The Honey Gaes 
Should all be of the largest pattern, to save time 
in drawing- oil honey, which, when thick or 
when low in the extiactor or tank, flows very 
slowly, and, if the gates are too small, will 
sorely test the patience of the operator. But 
do not ever leave a honey gate open and go 
about scin? other business, because the honey 
flows too slowly, thinking you can watch it or 
return in time, before the can gets full. Most 
likely something will draw your attention away, 
and wheu you fiually happen to think of the 
honey, you may find a "lake" of it on the floor, 
which will taue you more time to clean up, 
than if you had remained right with it, even if 
it did seem "kind o' tedious." 

Wu. MfTH-RASMrssEN. 

Independence, Cat. 

Mr. Bliss' Phenomenon. 

Editors Puess : -To W. W. Bliss, in Press 
of .June 20: Ves; I rise to explain to the best 
of my ability. The peculiar group of bees 
which he saw on' the wing were "pintin' for 
camp" in search of paregoric— had too much 
peach juice— that is, for the good of the fruit- 
growers. The bees in this vicinity are verilv 
disputing our possession to the fruits in our 
orchards, for. as soon as the peach shows a sus- 
picion of maturity, the bees attack them in 
such numbers as to only leave ihe pits and 
shell in less than twenty- four hours. I would 
ask Mr. Bee-keeper in a spirit of fairness and 
justice to all, if he would like us to enter his 
apiary and lessen his products in a similar 
minner - Mrs. A L. Avers. 

Temperance, Fresno Co. 



Chemistry of tue An.if.nts.— Chemistry, 
which, like other sciences, has been wonder- 
fully developed during the past century, is 
often mentioned as of recent origin, but many 
chemical facts were known to the ancients even 
before the dawn of historical times. Specimens 
of their work still in existence indicate that 
the ancient Egyptians had considerable chem- 
ical knowledge. They were skilled in smelting 
ores and working metals, h-.d a good under- 
standing of dyes, made glass and knew how to 
prevent decomposition of dead animal matter, 
while the priesthood evidently had some idea 
of pharmaceutical chemistry. 



The Guernsey Cattle. 

We have had mention from time to time of 
the Guernseys, but the cattle do not seem to 
be receiving the attention in this State which 
their merits should command. There are good 
Guernseys here and their numbers are increas- 
ing, but while we are searching for good 
material to import, the Guernseys should not be 
overlooked by the butter dairymen. We find 
in the i.-ton, Maine, Weekly Journal, an 
article by U. W. Clark, whose relatives are 
well known in this State, which contains many 
points of interest. 

The Guernsey is a fine, rich looking, deep- 
' bodied, sizable cow, with a mild and con- 
| tented expression. Their quality is shown in 
I the marked yellowness of the skin, where it 
can be seen, approaching to orange on the in 
I side of the ear, around the eyes, at the base 
1 of the horns, on the udder, teats and hoofs. 
The hair is tine, of various shades of color — 
red and white, yellow, fawn and white, and 
brown, fawn and white are common. Iu quality 
of milk, especially, in the deep golden yellow 
color of the cream and butfer they cannot be 
excelled or equalled by any other breed. 

The milk of the (Iuernsey cow is not only 
\ richer than that of any other breed and the 
butter made from it of a deeper color, but it 
! holds this high color during the winter when 
fed entirely on dry food, and the fl jw of milk 
is kept well up to calving. 

These qualities make the Guernsey cow a 
butter dairy cow of the first-class, and I believe 
it is the experience of all who have fairly 
tested the Guernsey stock, that they produce 
the richest milk and cream, and butter that in 
. grain, flavor and golden color, excels that of 
any and all other breeds. 

Good Size. 
The Guernsey is larger in frame and a little 
coarser in form than the Jersey. The oxen 
I are large and strong and fatten readily when 
put up to feed making good rich beef. The 
calves are good size and hardy, while the cow 
being a good-sized, substantial animal is not 
J only a good machine for producing milk and 
I butter, but with a tendency to fatten rapidly 
j wheu dried off. These are invaluable qualities 
to the practical farmer who wants not only a 
breed that with liberal feed will produce a 
liberal quantity of rich, gilt-edged butter, but 
also one that when fed for beef will turn to as 
good profit as those of any other breed. 

Mr. D.J. Mouilpied, honorary secretary of 
the Royal Guernsey Agricultural Society, at a 
meet:ng heldlast May, speaking of their aptitude 
to lay on flesh gives the following figures taken 
from the Royal Agricultural Society's reports: 
"In 1882 Matthew Tostevin exhibited an ox 
aged !t years and 8 months. This animal was 
from head to hind quarters !l feet, height 5 feet 
6 inches, width across loins 2 feet 7 inches, 
from shoulder to loins 5 feet li inches, girth 8 
feet 6 inches. His live-weight 2,02!) pounds 
Guernsey weight, equal to 2,350 pounds Eng- 
lish. " Mr. J. Le Page exhibited an ox aged 

6 years, weighing Hill pounds, live-weight, 
and the third prize was awarded to an ox aged 

7 years, the property of Mr. I). L. Ogier, weigh- 
ing 1840 pounds, live-weight: also at the same 
show C. Smith & Son a 3 year 7 mos. old steer, 
1564 pounds live weight; Mr. J. Tardiff a steer 
aged 3 years and 8 mos., weighed 1169 lbs. 
dead-weight. Mr. R. Best's heifer aged 3 yea s 
and •> mos., realized 000 lbs. of dressed meat, 
and Mr. P. G. Mollet, one aged 3 years 2 mos. 
which gave 74!) lbs. of dressed meat." Mr. 
Mouilpied adds: "We cite these figures without 
attaching any special importance to them, as 
they often occur at our shows; our object in 
doing so being that the (iuernsey cow is not 
ungenerous in the fattening stall, and that after 
18 years of good dairy work, she may still be 
turned over to good account." The Guernsey 
pound is about two oz. more than the English 
pound. 

Tne Guernsey at Home. 

The (Iuernsey breed of cattle take their name 
from the Island of Guernsey, which is one of 
the Channel Island group, belonging to Great 
Britain, situated near the coast of France. 
These cattle have been carefully bred on this 
island for over a hundred years, and in 1789 a 
law was passed by the insular Legislature for- 
bidding the importation of any cow, heifer, bull 
or calf, under a penalty of 200 livres, and the 
forfeiture of the boat and tackle which should 
bring them, and a further penalty of 50 livres 
OD any sailor on board who should fail to in- 
form of the importation. The law also provided I 
that if any animal was landed it should be in- 
stantly killed. This long period of thorough 
breeding has established and fixed the desired 
traits, so that there is no "striking back" to ; 
crosses that may bring outobjectional qualities, 
for the (iuernsey is probably the most pure 
bred of any cattle. The prepotency is such 
that the calves from native cows are strongly 
marked with the soft orange colored skin, and 
would often pass for full bloods, and many far- l 
mers have bought a Guernsey bull to head 
their herds of native and other breeds because 
of thiB quality. 

Of course there are some animals of undoubted j 
pure blood, that fall below the best, and are 
not so yellow as others or so large in size, but 



there is no doubt that in the hands of careful 
American breeders the Guernsey cow has a 
splendid future— a good butter machine, of 
good size, and a hardy constitution, there can 
be no doubt she is the coming cow. 

A Butter Test. 

"By that means I convince my customers 
that I don't sell oleomargarine," said a white 
| aproned butterman, pointing to two China 
| sauce-boats that stood in a conspicuous place on 
\ his counter in the Farmers' Market, to a 
i Philadelphia Times reporter. In each sauce - 
I boat lay a little coil of common lamp wick, one 
I end of which hung out of the nose of the vessel. 
"Now," said the dealer, pointing to two fir- 
kins, "oue of those contains oleomargarine, made 
| in Connecticut, and the other holds salt packed 
I butter from Ohio. See if you can detect the 
genuine from the imitation." The reporter tried 
| and failed. In flavor, smell, and appearance 
they were identical. The butterman continued : 
i "The oleomargarine will deceive nine buyers 
I out of ten, but I will expose it for you." He 
; dropped a lump of the oleomargarine as large as 
j an egg into a tin cup, and in another he placed 
a similar sized piece of the salt-packed. The 
cups were held over a blazing little charcoal 
furnace until their contents were melted. Then 
i the olemargarine was poured in one sauce-boat 
| and the butter into the other. Both burned 
readily, and the butter sent up a faint and 
pleasant smoke. From the oleomargarine, how- 
ever, came the nasty and unmistakable stench 
of burning rancid grease. "Since I began show- 
ing the difference between butter and oleomar- 
garine," said the dealer, as he snuffed out the 
wicks, "my business has doubled." 



Making Whey Butter. 



Editors Press: — For the benefit of "I. H. 



and others, I will tell them the way to make whey 
butter for greasing cheese, as made in the East. 
Skim off the cream that rises on the whey each 
morning until a sufficient quantity is obtained. 
| Put the cream in a kettle and boil it until it be- 
' comes a clear oil; the scum will work to the 
center of the kettle and can be skimmed off. It 
will take several hours to make it, and should 
be boiled over a slow fire. If properly made it 
will keep several years. It should be applied 
I to the cheese quite hot with a brush. 

SanUt Paula. L. M. Hardisen. 



Test for Oleomargarine. — Col. Colman 
has also directed Dr. Thomas Taylor, the micro 
scopist of the Department of Agriculture, to 
prosecute a series of experiments with the view 
of furnishing the public with a reliable test for 
detecting imitations or adulterated compounds 
of butter. Dr. Taylor finds that crystals of 
pure butter when fresh have a globular or 
ellipsoidal form, and that when these crystals 
are placed in a polarizer, its revolutions disclose 
a well defined Saint Andrew's cross in each one. 
When the crystals of oleomargarine, butterine, 
suet or lard are similarly exposed, they do not 
revolve with the turning of the polarizer, and 
they present a stella form, without the Saint 
Andrew's cross. The further prosecution of 
the experiments may simplify the test and fur- 
nish a legal statuB for pure butter. 



DAISY STATISTICS. At the Dairymen's Con- 
vention recently held in Boston some very in- 
teresting facts were elicited. Mr. 0. B. Haw- 
den furnished the following dairy statistics: 
He remarked that the country contains up- 
waidsof 15,000,000 of cows, from which their 
products supply the demand and use of the 
people, and even with this estimate a cow has 
to feed more persons than the nutrition and 
good living of the people demand. It requires 
some 2,000,000,000 of capital to conduct this 
vast interest, an amount sufficient to have 
canceled the national indebtedness at its maxi- 
mum. The men and women employed in the 
care of this immense herd, and the manipula- 
tion of its product, is some 650,000 and the 
food annually consumed is probably rising 60,- 
000,000 tons*. 



Restoration of Fertility. 

Editors Press: — This is generally conceded 
to be an off year for farmers, but this kind of a 
year seems to come oftener thau years ago. It 
is an undeniable fact that our lands are becom- 
ii.g grain sick. I think it will not be denied 
that even in the years when moisture in the 
soil favors the production of grain, that the 
yield on lands that have b»en long cultivated is 
not what it was. 

Of course California in favorable years shows 
a large aggregate of grain, but the total gain is 
due to new lands being brought under cultiva- 
tion. This exhaustion of the soil can be reme- 
died in a measure by varying our products and 
by turning our lands more to pasture. That this 
is btiog done is witnessed by our rapidly ex- 
tended vineyards and orchards, and also by the 
larger number of live stock that are being kept 
on lands heretofore devoted to the production 
of grain, It is fortunate for us that our re- 



Joly 11, 1885.] 



fACIFie F^URAb fRESS. 



23 



sources are so varied, that we can find a remedy 
so easy of application. We arc fortunate in 
having a climate and soil that are favorable to 
the production of many of the fruits that can- 
not be raised successfully over a large part of 
our country. Consequently there is not that 
danger of over production that there would be 
could those fruits be raised in the Eastern 
States as well as here, and be placed upon the 
market at the same time. 

We are fortunate also in that our lands worn 
out for grain furnish such excellent pasturage, 
that together with our climate we are enabled 
to raise cattle and horses more cheaply than in 
many places and of a quality that can be ex- 
celled nowhere. For I believe even in vaunted 
Kentucky with her blue grass pastures they 
begin to realize that there is a better place for 
the purpose of raising live stock. 

Of course, lands devoted to vineyards or or- 
chards may be considered as permanently with- 
drawn from the area devoted to grain culture, 
and must be kept up and renovated by the ap- 
plication of the fertilizers that their needs may 
require. 

But how will it be with the lands to devoted 
to pasture? Will pasturing for a term of years 
give the soil back those properties that have 
been taken away by long cropping, and fit them 
to produce wheat and barley as they did when 
they were new? 

This (juestion does not press for an answer as 
long as the market for cattle, grades as well||as 
pure bred, continues remunerative. Horses of 
good quality, either for draft or road, sell well 
at present. But there may come a time when 
the reverse will be the case, and grain be a bet- 
ter crop, provided lands are in a fit state to 
produce good crops. Of course, experience 
shows us that lands turned to pasture are im- 
proved, but under certain circumstances it is 
difficult to see just how they would be much 
benefited. Suppose, for instance, cattle are kept 
upon a piece of land to eat up the pasture growth. 
They are corralled or stabled at night and 
turned out after milking time in the morning, 
the manure at certain seasons of the year being 
gathered up and applied to other fields. Here 
all the growth of the soil has been turned into 
beef and milk, most of the manure applied to 
other fields. How has the pasture field been 
enriched? It looks as if it might have been im- 
poverished. 

I do not profess to be able to answer these 
questions with satisfaction to myself, but per- 
haps I can draw out some one else that will 
throw light on the subject, and I believe an an 
swer to these queries would be of general in- 
terest. In conversing with a farmer about 25 
years ago, he s ated that one kernel of wheat to 
the square foot would be ample seeding, pro- 
vided the soil were properly cultivated. At 
first glance the statement looked like an exagger- 
ation, still a kernel of wheat at that time 
placed in the soil and given ample room would 
throw up a great number of stalks, each one of 
a more vigorous growth than we see now. Then, 
50 lbs. per acre was good seeding; now, 100 lbs. 
is light. J. A. Brewer. 

CcnO rri'le, Alameda Co. 



jSjHEEf AND (JIXOOL. 

Our Sheep Industry. 

From the report of the Department of Agri- 
culture for January and February last, it ap- 
pears that the number of sheep in the United 
States is, for 1884, 50,626,6-26; for 1885, 
50,360,243— a decrease of 266,383, which, al- 
though undesirable, we must admit to be exceed- 
ingly small, in view of the exaggerated state- 
ments as to the decimation of flocks. The 
average price of the sheep in 1885 is placed at 
$2 14, which would give a total value of $107,- 
960,650. The following table shows States and 
Territories having one million head ana up- 
wards : 

States. Number. Av'ge Price. Value. 

New York 1,697,085 43 47 $ 5,890,967 

Pennsylvania... 1,486,851 3 10 4 609,288 

Texas 7,",r,s,4(il 1 i»5 14,7:«,!»9 

Ohio 4,900,035 2 50 12,250,' 88 

Michigan 2,3(54,174 2 69 6,86»,628 

Indiana 1,122, 1»4 2 38 2,670, 7°3 

Illinois 1,093,101 2 41 2,644 373 

Wisconsin 1,282,947 2 19 2,809,654 

Missouri 1,338,623 1 "9 2,896,185 

California ....5 892,911 1 89 11,137,602 

Oregon 2,519,950 1 61 4,057,120 

Colorado 1,186,942 1 86 2,205,852 

New Mexico 5,410,944 1 64 8,873,948 

The State haviDg the smallest number is 
Rhode Island, 20,866, and the State haviDg the 
largest number, under one million, is Kansas, 
S38.143. Notwithstanding the act of 1883, re- 
ducing duty on foreign wool, the decline in 
sheep husbandry — a little over 266,000— in 
1885 was less than a good many wool-growers 
anticipated, but nevertheless it is a decline, 
and will, in all probability, continue from year 
to year, unless the former duties are restored. 
By the reduction act of 1883, the clip of that 
year did not yield as much by five cents per 
pound as was realized in 1882, and this equaled 
the amount of $16,000,000 loss to the wool- 
growers of this country. 

The fact, however, remains that the produc- 
tion of wool has been gaining on consumption 
the world over. Australia now supplies more 
than one hundred pounds of wool for each one 
of her inhabitants, and after supplying the 
limited requirements of her own manufacturers, 



pours into the markets of Europe an aggregate 
equalling the entire product of the United 
States. The facilities for producing wool in 
Australia and other pastoral countries, where 
climate renders winder care and feeding unnec- 
essary, would, if it were not for our protective 
tariff, in time compel American producers to 
abandon their business and go into other pur 
suits. 

In the language of the wool growers' plat- 
form, adopted at the mass convention held in 
St. Louis in May of last year, "sheep husbandry, 
is an important factor in the prosperity of 
other agricultural pursuits, because of the 
utility of sheep in fertilizing the soil and re- 
plenishing exhausted lands; so that, if aban- 
doned or seriously diminished, our entire sys- 
tem of agriculture will be embarrassed, our ca- 
pacity for the production of meats, breadstuffs, 
etc., will be seriously diminished, and our great 
prosperity impaired. We cannot afford, as a 
nation, to endanger a great agricultural pursuit, 
which adds each year directly $150,000,000 to 
the nation's wealth, having invested in real 
estate not less thau $500,000,000 of capital, and 
which contributes indirectly so extensively to 
the nation's prosperity." 

The National Wool-Growers' Association and 
the National Association of Wool Manufactur- 
ers, representing the two branches of agricul- 
ture and manufacturiug industry, should unite 
in all honorable means to induce Congress to 
maintain and strengthen, if need be, the bar- 
rier against the importation of cheap foreign 
wool and woolens and such legislative action 
should be encouraged as will "place them on 
equal footing and give equal encouragement 
and protection in competing with the accumu- 
lated capital and low wages of other countries." 



Washing Sheep a Bad Practice. 

There are many reasons, says the Wool 
Journal, why the few growers who still persist 
should abandon tiie habit of washing their 
sheep before shearing, and we know of not a 
single argument in its favor. The practice was 
inaugurated at an early day, and it is a relic of 
old times, when the wool shorn from the small 
flocks in the Eastern States, was largely used up 
at home. Then it was necessary to wash it 
either before or after shearing, to prepare it for 
carding and spinning. Those days are passed, 
and both the sheep and their owners ought to 
be glad of it. 

The yoke in a healthy fleece is nature's pres- 
ervation of the fiber. It is a soapy matter, 
with a stroDg potash base, resembling no other 
animal secretion; it is, in fact, a soap, with 
more or less free oil. It preserves the elastic- 
ity of the fiber, and should be left in the wool 
until it is wanted for manufacturing use. 
Manufacturers well know that scoured wool, in 
time, becomes brittle and loses its elasticity, 
while unwashed retains all its good qualities in- 
definitely. It is doubtful if anybody ever saw 
a moth in unwashed wool. It is, as a rule, free 
from all vermin. The percentage of yolk in 
healthy flocks of even grade is quite uniform, 
but varying in different breeds from 25 per cent 
in the Leicester and other coarse breeds to 50 
to 75 per cent in the very finest S~.xon, the 
bucks always carrying more than the ewes. 
The system of washing in cold' water on the 
sheep's back never results in a washed fleece fit 
for the manufacturer, but only the eradication 
of an unknown aod uncertain part of the yolk, 
contained in the fleece, which is thus changed 
into an unmerchantable commodity to be sold 
on its uncertain merits as to shrinkage. The 
name or designation of washed wool has ceased 
to have any charm, and the sooner the practice 
of washing on the sheep is entirely abandoned, 
the better it will be for the sheep, their owners, 
and the trade generally. 



Wool in Australia. — Consul Griffin, of 
Sydney, reports to our Government many in- 
teresting facts relative to the wool industry of 
Australia. It seems not a little astonishing 
that a country of but little more than 3,000,000 
inhabitants should possess over 70,000,000 
sheep, with an annual wool product of as many 
dollars, entirely eclipsing in importance the 
mining interes s of the colonies which formerly 
made them notorious. The climatic conditions 
are the most favorable in the world, or at least 
as good as those of the most celebrated wool- 
producing countries of the Old World. 

Passing over the interesting history given of 
the wool industry there, we note what the con- 
sul says of the wools of New South Wales. 
These embrace many va'ieties, but their chief 
characteristics are fineness and elasticity, and 
they are believed to be equal to the best Sax- 
ony and superior to the latter when made into 
cloth, taking more distinct and delicately 
shaded colors in dyeing. 

The question of modifying the American 
duties on wool attracts much attention in Aus- 
tralia, where it is believed that there is no 
class of woolen goods made in Europe that 
could not be made in the United States, if the 
raw material was free. 



Keei-in<i Coal.— It is not generally known 
that coal is less valuable for having long re- 
mained in store perfectly dry. Most coal mines 
are saturated with water, and if the water is 
drained off the coal becomes flinty and value- 
less. Coal stored through the summer should 
be sprinkled and kept moist, 



JIIhE Xi^JvlBERJvlAN. 



Sending Logs Down Nevada Mountains. 

One of the most interesting sights to be seen 
in the Sierras is the manner in which logs are 
sent down to the valleys or river canyons from 
the timber hights above. A contemporary gives 
the following graphic description of one of these 
scenes as follows: 

A chute is laid from the river's brink up the 
steep mountain to the railroad, and while we 
are telling it, the monster logs are rushing, 
thundering, flying, leaping down the declivity. 
They come with the speed of a thunderbolt, 
and somewhat of its roar. A track of fire and 
smoke follow them— fire struck by their friction 
with the chute logs. They descend the seven- 
teen hundred feet of the chute in fourteen sec- 
onds. In doing so, they drop seven hundred 
feet perpendicularly. They strike the deep 
water with a report that can be heard a mile 
distant. Logs fired from a cannon could 
scarcely have a greater velocity than they have 
at the foot of the chute. The average velocity 
is over one hundred feet a second throughout 
the entire distance, and at the instant they leap 
from the mouth their speed must be fully two 
hundred' feet per second. A sugar-pine log 
sometimes weighs tens tons. 

What a missile! How the water is dashed 
into the air! Like a grand plume of diamonds 
and rainbows, the feathery spray is hurled to 
the hight of a hundred feet. It forms the 
grandest fountain ever beheld. How the 
waters foam and seethe, and lasli against the 
shore! Oae log having spent its force by its 
mad plunge into the deep waters, has floated 
so as to be at right angles with the path of the 
descending monsters. The mouth of the chute 
is, perhaps, 14 feet above the surface of the 
water. A huge log, hurled from the chute, 
cleaves the air and alights on the floating log. 
You know how a bullet glances, but can you 
imagiue a saw- log glancing? The end strikes 
with a heavy shock, but glides quickly past 
for a short distance; then a clash like the re- 
verberation of artillery, the falling log springs 
vertically into the air, and with a curve like a 
rocket falls into the water, a long distance 
from the log it struck. 



Lumber Interests on Puget Sound. 

In the western part of Washington Territory, 
says the Portland Journal of Commerce, and 
between the Cascade range on the east and 
Coast, or Olympic range on the west, and be- 
tween the 47th and 49th degrees of north lati- 
tude, is a thickly timbered belt of fir, cedar, 
alder, maple and other woods. Of these fir 
probably represents three-fourths. In the 
midst of this wealth of forest, nature has placed 
a broid, deep arm of the Pacific ocean — Puget 
sound — with which it is connected by the strait 
of Fuca. Thus not only has nature provided 
the timber, but the water-way also, by which 
it is possible for the merchant marine of the 
world to come and obtain their lumber supplies, 
much of which, some time in the future, must 
be furnished from these forests. Already the 
lumber trade with Australia, Central and South 
America, China and the islands of the Pacific 
amounts to fully 75,000,000 feet a year, and 
employs a fleet of abiut 15 vessels every month. 

Puget Sound is 200Lmiles long, and has a 
shore line of 1,800 miles. This irregular shore 
line forms innumerable harbors splendidly 
adapted for the erection of saw-mills and other 
wood-working factories, and also for the estab- 
lishment of ship yards. Along this whole shore 
line, and from thence on both sides as far as the 
eye reaches, nothing can be seen but the vast 
and magnificent wealth of timber, save here and 
there, where man has established a mill port, a 
town, or an occasional farm. 

In the timber belt of Western Washington 
there are 20,000,000 acres covered with timber, 
most of which is included within the limits 
named — in area nearly equal to the combined 
areas of the States of Connecticut, Massachu- 
setts, Vermont and New Hampshire. This, 
timber belt will average 25,000 feet of lumber 
to the acre, or a total of 500,000,000,000 feet of 
lumber. Hence, the saw mills of Puget Sound, 
with their present capacity of 500,000,000 feet 
per y< ar, would take 1 ,000 years to cut it down. 
The fir trees frequently attain the hight of 250 
feet, and plauks of lumber are sometimes turned 
out of these mills 100 feet in length. 



Timber and Lumbering in Shasta. 

To the east and northeast of the town of Red- 
ding, in Shasta county, and within from 30 to 
50 miles of the railroad station, is a large extent 
of fine timber and among it some of the finest 
sugar pine in the State. There is also much 
good timber on the Pit and Sacramento rivers. 
There is also a large body of timber to the west 
Of Kedding, and from 20 to 30 miles distant. 

There are 8 saw-mills in the county, from the 
simplest to the best, and which have never yet 
been able to Bupply the demand. Lumber costs 
at the mills from $10 to $12 per thousand feet. 
There are thousands of shakes, shingles and 
fence-posts made in this belt of timber. 

An interesting and important experiment has 
recently been made of sending logs down the 
Pit river, A successful drive, 2,500,000 feet 



was recently made. This is legarded as 
the most important undertakings ever n 
the county. So far as driving the river 
cerned, it was a complete and grand suu. 
The arrival of the logs was celebrated in Bad- 
ding by a general holiday and spirited jubilation 
over the event. 



Forest Firks. — Our forest products consti- 
tute the largest and most important of all our 
national industries, aggregating $700,000,000 
annually, $25,000,000 more than any other 
product of the country. Hence, anything 
which seriously affects that interest becomes a 
matter of great importance. It is with this in 
mind that we call attention to the astonishing 
assertion of the Lumber World that the loss to 
this country through forest fires is now not 
less than $300,000,000 a year, simply through 
the destruction of available timber without 
counting the additional loss from the annihila- 
tion of the young growth and the seeds scat- 
tered on the surface and the scorching of tho 
ground, which often renders it sterile for a gen- 
eration. 



Dcn't. 

Editors Press: — There are some funny 
things in the poultry busines ; some facts, 
which if stated to many people in the business 
would seem out of place, untrue, or of no ac- 
count. The longer I keep fowls the more I see 
to learn, and not only learn, but also put into 
daily practice. Theory is good in its place, but 
when it confl cts with the practical it ceases to 
be a factor for good in any business. 

There is much to do in the poultry yard to 
make it a success, which I may speak of at some 
future time, but let us take the other side — the 
don'ts — and see whatcan be bi ought outof tlern. 
It is not a very pleasant word at first sight, 1 
admit, but it is not always that which is most 
pleasing to us that is of value to us. 

Then first, don't be rash. Vour best judg- 
ment is wanted at all timer); take a cool second 
thought. Good judgment and coolness are in 
demand at all times in the poultry yard and 
coops. 

Another point nearly connected to the first 
is, don't be fretty. How quick a fowl will 
know you are out of sorts, and if followed up 
for any length of time will make a wild Hock of 
fowls, which are of little or no profit or pleas- 
ure. While I don't care to have fowls so tame 
as to be always under foot or in the house, yet 
I don't care to bring them up to run at the sight 
of a person. 

Don't be forgetful; it is almost useless to be 
in the business, and follow this don't for it will 
soon run the business underground, and I might 
add another don't in this class, which is don't 
be careless. These two don'ts are bad, very 
bad for the business. 

Don't buy poor stock, for it is a long pull to 
make good or first-class stock out of it, and why 
not, at a li tie more expense at the start, have 
good stock that will give quick returns, both in 
money and in pleasure, and also give you a good 
name and a good business. 

Don't provide poor coops for your birds, for 
if you do you will only live to regret it, and 
have to rebuild or go out of business, or else, 
have another flock to buy or rear. Don't feed 
poor food; don't overfeed; don't underfeed; 
don't feed sloppy feed; don't feed more at one 
time than fowls will eat up clean, for it will be 
a loss if you do. Don't be extravagant; don't 
be stingy; don't be lazy. Don't brag too much, 
for you may get caught at it, and most people 
know wind is cheap, and will judge your fowls 
by the way the wind blows. S*y what you 
honestly have whether you talk or advertise, 
and you will meet your reward. Don't expect 
to realize all your wants in a short space of 
time, for it takes time to arrive at perfection in 
this business. 

Now don't, oh dou't, get mad when I tell 
you this, for it is so, and you can't help it ex- 
cept by living and learning. Don't fool your- 
self by thinking you know it all, for it will be 
doubted by all but yourself, and you will be all 
alone in your glory. 

Don't go to the other extreme and think you 
don't know anything, for you must know many 
things, and practice them too. Don't expect 
more of others than you are willing to grant 
yourself. 

I have not finished the list, but 1 think I 
have given enough to begin with, and to give 
all a chance to find the remainder of them. 
And now, last of all, don't forget that there 
are two sides to the business. Seek the pleasant 
and profitable side of it. E. C. CLAPP, 

South Pasadena, Cal. 



Advice Wanted. 

EDITORS Press: — Would one of your experts 
and contributors in the poultry column answer 
a few questions for a beginnei? What capacity 
incubator is best for a woman to start with in 
raising chickens? Is a first-class breed beat to 
experiment on, or will some of the common 
stock do as well? How much capital ; s needed 
when there is a good fenced yard and a good 
house for roosting? Perches, drinking vessels 
and feed must be procured. Will $50 be suf- 
ficient until some broilers begin to bring in a 
little profit? A reply from Borne one who is 
posted will greatly oblige A Bkoi!>,,s'er. 



24 



f ACIFI6 RURAlo fRESS 



[Joly 11, 1885 



JPatrons of Husbandry. 

Oorrospondenco on Grange principles and work ami re- 
ports of transactions of subordinate Granges are respect- 
fully solicited for this department. 

The Sacramento Grangers and Fruit- 
growers. 



EdITOKS PbesS: — As you requested last I»e- 
c ember, I now send you "note of anything in- 
teresting in the Grange," only the second time, 
I believe, iu six months that it would be worth 
the space it would occupy. 

At our meeting on the 13th inst., we were 
favored with the presence of visitors, some of j 
whom came to discuss the advisability of start- 
ing a fruit-drier in the vicinity. Mr. .Meeker, 
also came in a few moments to show us speci- 
mens of fruit "preserved" by the Meeker drier, j 

Bro. Krull, W. M. of Knterprise Grange, had 
but little to say, but thought something ought 
to be done for self-protection, and cited an in- 
stance to show the state of the market and the 
way it affects us. Having asked the price of a 
certain kind of fruit of a dealer iu Sacramento, j 
he was told it was six cents per pound. Saying 
he would "bring in some to morrow," he was 
told they were paying but four cents. Me had 
evidently been misunderstood. So fruit-raisers 
may work hard and be at great expense to 
raise fruit and take it to market, while he 
who buys to sell again, with but little time or 
expense, gets halt as much as the producer, 
that is 33! per cent of the consumer's money. 

Bro. Tnos. Waite, also of Enterprise Grange, 
thought fruit drying might help us now while 
we have such a surplus on hand. 

Bro. L. H. Fasset, of Florin, did not favor 
the project, as fruit-drying adds something to 
the cost of producing, yet it can only extend 
the market a trifle: for of the thousands of peo- 
ple in various parts of Europe who cannot buy 
fruit now, a great share of them could not buy 
it at any price, as many can barely get enough 
to buy black bread with. Bro. Fasset has 
known one firm to dry fruit who would be very 
glad to get back a part of the money put into 
the business. 

A committee was appo'uted to confer with 
those appointed by other Granges, and you may 
get a report from ttiem. 

There is little doubt but the fruit question 
will be kept before the Grange till there is suf- 
ficient co-operation throughout the length and 
breadth of the land to bring it to a firm remun 
erative price. Mrs ImooENC A. Casey. 

Florin, Cal. 

The Co-operative Association. 
The Record-Union has a short report of the 
meeting of Sacrameuto Grangers and fruit- 
growers, to which wc alluded in last week's] 
Rr ra i.. Although some of the statements will I 
bs found a repetition of our last week's notice, i 
the importance of the meeting to be held on | 
Saturday of this week, will warrant the repeti- 
tion: 

There wa9 a meeting of fruit-growers at 
Grangers' Hall, in this city, on Saturday, dune | 
27th, to consider methods for improvement of j 
prices for orchard and vineyard products. Asa j 
Lowe was elec ed chairman of the meeting and 
Mr. Ogden secretary. A very free discussion j 
took place, in which present prices were re- ! 
garded as entirely unsatisfactory, and there 
seemed to be a unanimity of opinion that the 
remedy was to be found only iu a fruit-grow- 
ers' association, whereby they could become di- 
rect shippers or can their own surplus fruit, | 
etc., whenever that would be more profitable 
to the members than to sell to commission mer- 
chants. At the close of the discussion a com- 
mittee of nine was chosen to consider and draft 
a plan for organization, to be submitted to a 
subse(|U<>nt meeting. The committee consists 
of l>r. W. A. Hnghson, E. Greer, G. \V. Han- 
cock, P. H. Murphy, A B. Burns, lUvid ! 
Luhin, T. I). Lufkin, G. B. Green and J. H. 
Butter. The committee arranged to meet < 
at Dr. Hughson's office Friday afternoon, | 
•luly '.id, at 2 o'clock. The meeting then ad- 
journed to meet again at Grangers' Hall on 
Saturday, July 1 1th, at 10 A. when an or- 
ganization will probably be effected. 

W vrx>s\ i i.i. k Gb&NOB PiCMO. Watsonvtlle 
G range held a very enjoyable picnic, last Fri- 
day, at Camp Goodall. Everything tended to- ! 
ward making it a success. The brightness of j 
the morning sun, the invigorating effect of the i 
pure air as it was wafted by the gentle mount- j 
ain breezes, the clear waters of the broad, beau- 
tiful I'acitie, the fine scenery which everywhere 
met the beholder's views, could not but inspire 
all with the feeling that that was the time and 
that the place for a day of recreation. Added 
to this were the smiling faces and friendly I 
greetings of many of the farmers of this and 
surrounding valleys, who came, bringing with 
them their families and friends, and such huge 
dinner luxes and baskets as is rarely seen. At 
1 o'clock a long table at the warehouse was 
spread with everything that could tempt the 
eye and palate. A noticeable feature was a 
basket of delicious peaches, which Mr. Bullock, 
of Brown's V alley, passed the eutire length of 
the table. After partaking of this feast of good 
things, all repaired to the pavilion to listen to 
the following programme, which had been 
hastily prepared, but which was well received 



by the many visitors: "Picnic Song," Grange 
Cnoir; recitation,"FarmerGray Photographed," 
Miss Louise Kidder; duet, "Santa Lucia," Mrs. 
Dr. Schloss and Mrs. Dr. Spence; recitation, 
"The Frenchman's Flea Powder," Miss Josie 
Roache ; address by Worthy Master, A. P. 
Roache; "Philip, the Hermit," Miss Hoggins; 
solo, "Janet's Choice," Mrs. .1. J. Uoadhouse; 
reading, "Do Grangers Progress ? " Mrs. A. P. 
Kiache; song, "The Plowman," Grange choir. 
The address of the Worthy Master received 
well merited applause, both for the concise and 
eulogistic style iu which it was written, and 
the efficient manner with which it was de. 
livered. All returned to their homes fully con- 
vinced that Gamp Good ill was a fine place for a 
picnic, and that such gatherings were not only 
pleasant but profitable, ai d should be more 
numerous.- X. in the Pajaroniun. 



Practical 



Patriotism 
Grange. 



by Stockton 



Editors Press: — Two weeks prior to July 4th 
there was a committee appointed from Stockton 
Grange with instructions to prepare lunch on the 
Fourth, the proceeds of which were to be donated to 
the Gridley Monument Fund. The instructions 
were fully carried out, and 1 send you a copy of this 
morning's Stockton Independent with the request 
that you will please copy the report of the com- 
mitee in order that your readers may know what we 
have accomplished Mary F. Merrill, Stoeklon. 

The following is the report of the committee 
alluded to, and certainly the members are en- 
titled to great credit: 

The committee having in charge the G range 
lunch served at Masonic temple, July 4th, pre- 
sent the following report: 

Subscriptions paid $ G4 .SO 

Lunch 257 25 

Sale of books 2 00 

Soda and cigars 10 80 

Total receipts $334 35 

Expenses 50 02 

Net receipts $283 43 

In addition to this there are subscriptions un 
paid to the amount of $30. 

The committee desire to return thanks to the 
following named merchants of Stockton for con 
tributions in their various lines: Southworth 
.V Grattan, K. B. Parker, H. G. B'jisselier, C. 
V. Thompson, Chesnut wood A Moore, C. Per- 
kins, J. B. Parker, Carringtou Brothers, T. P. 
Mnore, Mrs. W. J. Bidding, t'has. Balding, 
Julius Colin, L. Wolfe, Alexander Chalmers, 
Hartley it Cornwall. Also to the following 
named for assistance rendered in a variety of 
ways: Stockton Daily Mail, Henry Adams, of 
Gas Company, John Jackson, Leroy Atwood, 
F. R. Clarke, of Clarke's Business College, Con- 
gregational society. Baptist church, A. Eiston, 
I'arker, painter, W. W. Cowell, Mrs. M. S. 
Thresher and others. We also desire 'o spe- 
cially thank the proprietors of the Stockton 
Daihi Imli /u ntil 11I for their invaluah'e assist- 
ance in inserting advertisemen s and printing 
bills free of charge. 



The Grange and the Fairs, 

We are glad to know that our Grangers are 
taking more interest in the fairs in this State 
and sharing more largely in their management 
than formerly. As the fairs are soon to begin, 
it is proper to discuss the relations which mem- 
bers of the I Irder should bear to them. Down 
in New Hampshire, the State Grange took rp 
the subject of fairs at last year's meeting, some 
400 members of the Order being present. The 
Master of the council said: It is true, and can 
be proved, that fairs are not conducted on 
sound agricultural principles, but for this error 
and mistake the farmers are alone to blame. As 
farmers, we must cultivate a desire, taste, and 
appreciation for the worth and value these ex- 
hibitions offer progressive farming. Because 
fairs are failures, through the standing aloof of 
those they were designed to benefit, is a poor 
and slim excuse for abandoning them. Farm 
ers can conduct these enterprises if they will. 
Every town should have a club, society, or 1 
(Jrangeto awaken and arouse them to action. : 
We fail to appreciate the value these institu- 
tions offer us. Wc must be united on all matters 
promotive of our improvement if we desire im- 
provement, and not be fault-finding and contin- 
ually pulling down the good done and being 
done for the agricultural interests. 

Walter Sargent considered fairs the best of 
schools for agricultural improvement; a careful | 
look, comparison and examination of the exhib- 
its carefully noted will be profitable to the indi 
vidual, I care not who he is; this coming in con- 
tact with others and others' products is what 
helps and improves our farming methods. Too 
much care cannot be taken in wise selection of 
faithful and impartial judges and committees; 
such men can be found; find them you must if 
you wish the fairs to contiuue. The fair was a 
success that he was connected with when man- 
aged by live farmers, and that end faithfully 
labored for. 

John C. Mills said when farmers show the 
zeal, euergy and effort displayed by others, they 
will have fairs after their own mind and heart, 
and not until then. Fairs build up a people 
and community; cast out the beam, brother 
farmers, and we see the mote less distinctly. 
Don't pull down helps to better farming, but 



try to correct the evils and improve the system, 
if found faulty. 

Charles Id related that at the early in- 
stituting of fairs all were treated equal; every- 
thing was fair in name and fact; the Merrimack 
County Society prospered while farmers were 
at the head; but after awhile the trotting ele- 
ment came in, the farming element went nut, 
and down went the fair. The State and New 
England Fair was a piece of imposition on the 
agricultural people. What can farmers do 
with $4,000 animals'.' Where does the $40,000 
yearly income of the society go to? Echo au- 
Rwers "where !" But, after all, what are the 
farmers going to do about it? 

Captain David Morrill, a veteran farmer of 
eighty-four years, related pleasant reminis- 
cences of his knowledge of fai's; he was present 
at Exeter in 1820, when the first fair in that 
county was held; was present at the first in 
Merrimack county, and had followed their 
growth and changes; the agricultural features 
seemed to be gradually crowded out; profes- 
sional men were stepping in to manage. No 
trotting nor dog shows in those times. All 
fairs, whether town, county, State, or New- 
England, with right management, are a great 
help and aid to agriculture. 

John P. Kimball urged the fanners to join 
the societies and elect men as officers from their 
ranks, and bring the reformation they ask. 
Seldom do practical farmers get appointed on 
committees, but rather the doctor, lawyer, and 
professional gentlemen are recognized. Style, 
expense, coach and driver are the order of the 
day. 

R. E. Collins would answer the question in 
the affirmative and in the negative l>oth. 
Many a farmer goes to the fair with 
the best stock in his class, but through favorit 
ism his are ignored, and the ribbons adorn in 
ferior cattle. This is one of the sorry features 
of the present system of fairs; it must be re- 
formed; more practical farmers must take the 
guiding oar, or down goes the institution, but 
which, if rightly controlled, can aid the cause 
of agriculture beyond estimation. 

Napa County Notes. 

Apple trees are bending low with fine fruit. 

Many almond trees are bountifully loaded. 

A great many vineyards will yield superior 
grapes and in goodly quantity. 

Mountain-top vineyards are rapidly increas- 
ing aud invariably look promising. 

Same small, seemingly "shut-in valleys" 
have suffered mos f . severely from frosts. 

The Fourth of July celebration by the Napa 
County Firemen, at St. Helena, was a success. 
Four companies, two good brass bands and a 
host of enterprising citizens and friends were in 
attendance. Hon. H. A. Pellet, a well-known 
citizen of St. Helena, and leading member of 
the Grange has been seriously ill latdy. 

Hon. Seneca Ewer informs us that while 
busiuess at present is depressed at St. Helena, 
as in many other localities, the people of that 
vicinity are quite hopeful for the future. 

The road fiend who delights in shovelling a 
coating of dry loam over the highway after the 
last rains of the season, to be ground into pow- 
dered dust a foot deep, has made his abomin 
ation manifest in both hill and valley. 



Agricultural J^otes. 



The Bartholdi Statue Fund. 

According to promise we publish a list of 
those who have contributed to the fund for the 
erection of the Birtholdi S'.atue, " Liberty En- 
lightening the World," and to whom the minia- 
ture statues have been sent as souveuirs, as 
fully described iu the Rirai. of June 27: 

M. T. Brewer, S. F., $1; T. G. Human, 
Wadsworth, Nev., $1; C.G.Yale, S. F.. $2; 
Mrs. W. I). Ashley, Stockton, I; F. W. Kroe 
her, St. Helena, $1; Joseph Sexton, Gjleta, 
Cal., $5; Mrs. W. T. Browne, Stockton, $1; 
Mrs. W. H. Boothe, S. P., SI; Clarence Rav- 
lin, Sin Jose, $1. 

Aki/)Na Graces.— Arizona is coming tor- 
ward with a claim to supply California with 
early fruits. The Record Union tells of Black 
Morocco grapes at a store in Sacrameuto last 
week, sent by Frank E>ving, from Yuma, A. T. 
Mr. Ewiug was formerly a resident of Sacra- 
mento, but is now engaged in pioneer fruit- 
growing in Arizona, believing that the well- 
known hot climate there will produce so much 
earlier than elsewhere that there will be large 
p-otits, in absence of competition in market. 
If the Black Morocco grape, and other varie- 
ties that ripen with it in this State can be put 
into market from Arizona by the first of July, 
there will be an abundant field and demand for 
them, with a large profit to the producer, as it 
is a month or more ahead of the same variety 
grown in this State. 

Hay is being shipped from Livern.ore valley 
to points in Northern Arizona, the fn ight being 
over £24 per ton. 



CALIIFOBNIA. 
AUmecla. 

Gkai-k PhiuBS.— From report of Yitieultural 
Society meeting in Livermore Herald: (Ques- 
tion to Mr. Mortier: Has Mr. Aguillon de- 
cided upon the prices he will pay for grapes this 
year? Mortier: No. He will give, however, 
as much as is paid in Napa, Sonoma, and other 
vineyard districts. Prices will rule low. One 
San Jose fruit-grower has contracted his Petit 
Pinot and Plousseau at $32; the wine-maker will 
set no price for other varieties as yet. 

Fresno. 

The Raisin Crop. — Republican: The pros- 
pects for a splendid raisin crop in Fresno this 
season arc very bright. Mr. Nye, foreman of 
the Hedge Row Vineyard, informs us that this 
season's crop will be the largest ever taken 
from that vineyard. The vines are literally 
loaded. Besides their own crop, the proprietors 
of this vineyard are prepared to handle all the 
grapes produced by smaller growers In that lo- 

' cality. At the Butler Vineyard, to meet the 
requirements of the enormous crop on the vines, 
a packing house 74x140 h is been built. In this 
building a force of 250 men can be worked. 
Other raisin growers report equally flattering 
prospects. The grasshoppers have given some 
trouble in places, but so far as we have learned 
the loss from this source will be slight. With 
favorable conditions from now on, the raisin 
crop in Fresno this year will be something to 

1 astonish those who have not observed the de- 
velopment of the industry. 

The Cannery. — The Fresno caunery will 
commence operation on uext Tuesday, and will 
be prepared to receive fruit on that day. The 
cannery starts up rather late this season, which 
is owing to the shortness of the apricot crop, 

1 that being the principal early canning fruit in 

■ this section. The Cutting Packing Company 
of San Francisco, has again taken charge of the 
cannery, and Mr. Q. J. Stevens, as heretofore, 
will have supervision of the work. 

IltaraarOB -Gustav Eisen, who has been. ap 
pointed Local Inspector of Fruit Pests, gives 
notice that he will proceed to enforce the law- 
bearing on this matter. Jt must now be.h°rne 
iu mind that the local inspector has full power 
to enforce the disinfection of orchards, and in 
case the owner refuses or neglects to do so he is 
guilty of a misdemeanor, aud upon complaint 
of the inspector it becomes ihe duty of the dis- 
trict attorney to prosecute the owner of such 
infected orchard. 

Humboldt. 
Tin: Shkki' Interest. — Cor. Simulant, July 
4: At Phillipsville. Aaron Chaltin has SO acres, 
of which 30 is under cultivation. Mr. Chaftin 
came to Humboldt 20 years ago from Colusa 
county, and has continued to reside here since. 
He laments the advent of sheep; he says before 
cattle were superseded times were better, 
money more plenty. Although he owns a fine 
range, he looks forward to seeing sheep raising 
a nominal interest in Humboldt and to the ad- 
vent of cattle again as the leading interest. 

Lassen. 

KditORS Press: -This is a very hard year for 
the farmers in this valley (Honey Lake valley). 
Last fall and this summer grain has had very 
slow sale at one cent per pound, and a good 

I deal has been sold forless than that. Hay is only 
about a half crop. Grain is looking very well, 
but in this locality (on west side of the lake) on 
June 30th we ha. I a very severe hail storm that 
did great damage to grain. I think 5 bushels 
per acre of shelled grain would not be too large 
an estimate for barley. The damage to wheat 
is not »o great, although it is considerable, and 
the thunder and lightning that accompanied 
the storm, well, 1 can't describe it. It was truly 
appalling. Gardens are almost ruined with the 

1 hail. The tender plants are almost destroyed. 
Some of the farmers will have considerable hay 
damaged as a good mauy had their hay cut and 
ready to haul. This seems to be rather a tough 
season for California -C. R. W., Janetvilte, 
IjOS Angeles. 
Mk. Rook not to Buy Grates. — L, J. Rise, 
of Sunny Slope, San Gabriel valley, publishes a 
circular letter to the viueyardists in this sec- 
tion, informing them that he will nut buy 
grapes this season. He states his inability to 
do so, after having used every endeavor £0 do 
otherwise. He offers his wiuehonse and dis- 
tillery for sale at actual cost to the fi 111 of 
Stern & Rose, and suggests that the vineyard 
iRts form a stock company and work up their 
grapes together, as being more economical and 
profitable than by individual wineries. Mr. 
Rose's plant has a capacity to work up aud 
store half of the grapes iu this valley, and un- 
less arrangements can be made to run the dis- 
tillery and winepresses, acinus loss will be en- 
tailed on those who raise grapes for wine and 
depend on large buyers, of which Mr. Rose was 
one of the largest, to take a crop off their hands. 
It is stated that the shut down is not due to 
any depression in the market, but that the co- 
partnership of Stern >x Rose expires in a year 
and they have a large stock of wine and brandy 
on hand which they wish to dispose of before 
dissolving. If not sold, Mr. Rose will use his 
own grapes for wine, but not buy any from out- 
siders. 

Mendocino. 
Brick Kiln. — Disj.atrlr. The brick kiln of 
1). C. Pitner, one and a half miles north of 



Joly 11, 1885.] 



pAClFie F^URAIo fRESS. 



25 



Ukiah, has been completed, and it proves to be 
a roomy and substantial structure. It is '26x52 
feet, with walls 27 feet high, divided into two 
apartments, each having a two-third pitch hip 
roof mounted with a sheet iron cowl. The kiln 
floor is ISA feet above the ground. Attached to 
this building is a frame shed, 16x52 feet, which 
is connected to the cooling-room by a bridge 
8x80 feet. The cooling-room is a frame build- 
ing, 24x80 feet, with a shed 16x80 feet. There 
are two floors in the main building above the 
press room. 

Placer. 

Foothill Farms. — Colfax Cor. Bee: Four- 
teen years ago R. 8. Egbert, now of Oakland, 
and J. M. Graham, now of St. Helena, as an 
experiment planted 10 acres to about 15 varie- 
ties of grapes, which attracted no attention till 
the fruit was exhibited at the Stite fair and 
took prizes. This gave an impetus to vine- 
planting and attracted a good deal of attention, 
so that a healthy immigration has set in and a 
good many hundred acres of land have changed 
hands, and actual settlers have become the pos 
sessors and are now actively engaged in clear 
ing r.nd improving their land. Among the new- 
coiners are Wm. M. Baker, formerly of Brigh- 
ton, who has 280 acres. He planted 1,500 as- 
sorted fruit trees, and about five acres to grapes. 
He is now preparing about 20 acres for next 
season's planting. Dawson Brothers, formerly 
of Sacramento, have 160 acres and have 40 
acres already planted to wine and table grapes. 
Moore, Harrison & Williams, of Beaver Falls, 
Pa., Stockton, Cal., and Carson, Nev., respect- 
ively, own 560 acres, on which they planted 70 
acres to wine and table grapes. They have a 
force of men clearing and preparing land for an 
addition to their vineyard next spring. S. B. 
Ridgeway, formerly of Sacramento, has 160 
acres. He has built a substantial house and 
barn, and put the place under a good fence, and 
planted 10 acres to trees and vines. G. O. Hay- 
ford, of Sacramento, has 80 acres, and has 
planted 15 acres to trees and vines. J. G. 
Howell and family, of Oakland, have lately 
moved on to an 80 acre tract. They have built 
a nice house, and are now preparing for plant- 
ing 10 acres to vines next season. Maxwell 
Bros., of Oakland, have already planted 20 
acres to vines and trees on their SOacre tract. 
Scheld & Shepherd, of Sacramento, have a force 
of men clearing 40 acres, on which they contem- 
plate planting Bartlett pears and vines next 
Bpring. James G. Martine has lately bought 
50 acres, which he willsoon improve. Hayford 
& Mcore planted 40 acres to grape cuttings on 
what was then supposed to be dry side-hill, two 
years ago. The vines are now bearing a small 
crop, much to the surprise of the "oldest in- 
habitant." Wm. Irving planted, last spring, 30 
acres to vines and 5 acres to pears. J. Kuenzley 
is fencing and preparing to plant 20 acres to 
vines next season. George Hubley, of Oak- 
laud, planted 30 acres to vines the past season. 
Lobner Bros, have planted 20 acres to vines 
and trees the past season, and are preparing to 
plant 20 more next spring. Spencer Bros., 
formerly of Sonoma, have started a nursery, 
and have planted about 5 acres to vineyard. 
Snook Bros., of New Zealand, have 40 acres, on 
which they planted 10 acres to vines and trees 
this season. Besides these there are a number 
who have only recently bought, and others who 
have planted 5 acres or less to vines. It 
is now conceded that no finer fruit and vine 
land exists in the State, and that no other sec- 
tion enjoys the shipping facilities that this does. 

San Benito. 

Anti-Horse Thief Association'. — Free. 
Ln ure: A number of prominent farmers and 
stockmen arc agitating the subject of organiz- 
ing an association for the protection of their 
property against the depredations of horse and 
cattle thieves. The idea is, we believe, to set 
apart a fund which may be used for the pursuit 
of, and to secure the conviction of criminals of 
the class referred to. The fund will be used for 
the benefit of all who subscribe and who may 
need its services. We believe there was an in- 
formal organization of this kind some time ago, 
and there is still a small sum on hand to its 
credit. If 50 or 60 of our farmers will join 
together, an available fund can be raised with 
ease. The very fact of such an organization 
being in existence, with capital enough to pur- 
sue criminals to a conviction, would serve to 
deter those same criminals from practicing their 
roguery in this county. It is a good scheme, 
and if properly managed is bound to give the 
desired result. A meeting of farmers with this 
object in view will be held in Hollister on Sat- 
urday, .luly 11th. All farmers or owners of 
stock are invited to be present. 

Sacramento. 
Fruit Notes. — Record- Union, July 4: The 
Sacramento river boats are bringing immense 
lota of fruit to Sacramento, where it is loaded 
into cars and shipped to Eastern points by Sac- 
ramento shippers. The fruit comprises Bart- 
lett pears, several varieties of plums, apricots, 
peaches and apples. The fruit is generally pre- 
pared and packed for shipment in the orchard, 
so that on its arrival here no time is lost in get- 
ing it properly loaded and started on its East- 
ern trip. Besides the river fruit, large lots 
come in by rail from other sections, Sacramento 
being a common center. As a result, a large 
number of cars are going forward daily — so 
many that already some marketa are being over 
stocked, which uaually meana losa to the ship- 
per. Besidea the Eastern markets, Sacramento 
dealers have a large trade in the neighboring 
towns, as well aa in adjoining Statea, for vari- 
ous kinda of fruit and vegetables, and large lota 



are moved daily by express and freight. In 
small fruits the season is now well advanced, 
cherries, currants, strawberries and raspberries 
having almost entirely disappeared. Black- 
berries are now a great feature, the crop being 
an immense one. They are grown near the 
city, and brought in in wagons. The season is 
at least three weeks earlier than usual on nearly 
all varieties of fruit. Bartlett pears are being 
picked in some localities a month earlier than 
usual. The first Crawford peaches made their 
appearance last week, from the Sacramento 
river; the first nectarines and first cling peaches, 
from Penryn. Fruit of all kinds is very fine, 
the pears especially being smooth and so far re- 
markably free of codlin moth, etc. The Bart- 
lett pear crop of the Hopping estate, comprising 
some 4,000 boxes, was Saturday sold by the ex- 
ecutors of the estate. Sealed bids were re- 
ceived from a i large number of dealers, pur- 
chasers beiug the firm of W. R. Strong & Co., 
of this city. The price paid is not made pub- 
lic. This is one of the largest crops in this dis- 
trict. 

Santa Cruz. 

A Correction. — Editors Press: — Allow me 
to correct a statement made in your issue of 
J uly 4th, as copied from the Santa Cruz Sentinel, 
in regard to our canned goods as exhibited by 
us at the Santa Cruz County Floral and Fruit 
Fair, held on June 4th, 5th and 6th last. We 
did not use "a Loomis jar," as stated, hav- 
ing never seen any such jar. The jar used, and 
one which we believe the best for our purpose, 
and decidedly satsfactory in its working, was 
the "Lightning," an Eastern jar. The exhibit 
of canned goods consisted entirely of cherries, 
but we are busy putting up all varieties, includ- 
ing plums, peaches, apricots, pears, jellies, 
jams, etc. 

This is only an experiment with us, being the 
first year we have put any on the market. 
Thus far, everything is satisfactory and the out- 
look encouraging. — Owen Bros., Santa Ciuz. 

Solano. 

Apricots. — Vacaville Judlcion. Henry Brinck, 
of Pleasant Valley, says his apricot crop this 
year aggregated over 8,000 boxes. The bulk 
has been shipped to San Francisco, selling at 
no time at less than 55 cents per box. The 
first apricots he sold to Earl for Eastern ship- 
ment brought him 21 cents per pound, peaches, 
5 cents per pound. Mr. Brinck has sold some 
dried fruit at Sh cents. He speaks very en- 
couragingly of the prospects of the fruit busi- 
ness and believes that it will continue to ex- 
pand, the Eastern market being yet hardly 
tested. He is well satisfied with this season's 
results so far 

Sonoma. 

Editors Peess: — When I first came up here 
I did not intend to stay more than six months, 
but the longer I stay the more I like the place, 
it is so healthy and there is such pure water. 
It is in great contrast to the plains of the San 
Joaquin valley, where I have been living. There 
is no trouble about irrigation; the finest fruit 
and grapes grow here needing no irrigation. 
There is no fiost in these foothills, as I had 
volunteer potatoes come up and were fit to eat 
in March. There is some government land 
around here, but it is very rough. — John Tur- 
lev, Glen Ellen. 

Yolo. 

The Houser Harvester. — Winters Express: 
The total cost of harvesting per acre with the 
Houser machine is about 90 cents, which is a 
considerable saving over the old way. On 
Tuesday we visited Edward Wolfskin's ma- 
chine, and saw some good work being done. On 
Saturday last they put out 633 sacks of wheat 
of an average weight of 141 pounds. This is 
the greatest run yet made — 10 hours being the 
actual time consumed — and fairly entitles Mr. 
Wolfskill's machine to the belt. Messrs. Wm. 
Sims and Wm. Baker each have a Houser, and 
have done excellent work, turning out 561 and 
576 sacks a day respectively. 

Tulare. 

Blackberries Pay. — Register: Blackberries 
are a very profitable crop in all parts of Tulare 
county, and anyone who will rig up a windmill 
and pump can irrigate enough of them to buy 
the groceries for the family during the summer 
months, in addition to what may be canned for 
use during the winter. Mr. John W. Dunlap 
brought in a couple of boxes of the Lawton va- 
riety on Tuesday that were as large and luscious 
as any that we have ever seen. Mr. Dunlap 
has three rows of blackberries in his garden, 
each about 100 feet long, but so many vines 
failed to come when planted that he has only 
about two-thirds of a stand. From this little 
patch he has picked fully 400 lbs. this season, 
and sold them at eight cents per pound. Thirty- 
two dollars is not a bad income to derive from 
such a little patch of ground, but Mr. Dunlap 
says that if his berries had all been of the Law- 
ton variety his income would have been very 
much greater. Every farmer should have a 
clump of blackberries on hia place. 



Jersey Prices. — At a sale of Jer8ey cattle 
at Springfield, 111., on June 24th, 1!) cows and 
heifers were sold for $2,675; an average of 
#140.7!) each. A correspondent of the Press, 
commenting on the sale, says: "In view of the 
general scarcity of ready money, particularly 
among farmers and stockmen, at this season of 
the year, and that the wheat harvest, near at 
hand, gives no promise of relief in money mat- 
ters, the parties making this sale may consider 
themselves and their stock complimented by 
the prices realized." 



Sorrel Prescriptions. 

Gas Lime Proposed. 

Editors Press:— I would say that since the 
party wishes the remedy for sorrel to 
be cheap, I call his attention to the offer made 
by C. W. Quilty, of San Jose. 

He offers the refuse lime from the gas works 
of San Jose for experimental purposes free. 
This lime has a small amount of sulphur and 
some ammonia; the latter acts with the lime 
in destroying the sorrel, and will probably pre- 
vent the necessity of plowing, which they al- 
ways do in the Eisteru States, thus collecting a 
large amount of ammonia to be used in taking 
the sourness from the soil. 

I find that the San Jose Gas Works use the 
Guadalupe lime, and I also find that it contains 
no magnesia, which is an important item that 
should be noticed when lime is put upon land: if 
it contains magnesia in large amounts it will 
ruin the soil on which it is placed. Since all 
the receipts have called for lime, before trying 
this article, the experimenter to be sure that 
there is, if any, but a small percentage of mag- 
nesia in his lime. If there is a large percentage 
then I would prefer the sorrel to the magnesia. 
— J. J. Shaner, Los Gatos, Cal. 



Imperial Barley. 

Editors Press: — The Imperial barley that 
you sent ine last year is doing splendidly. I 
had three bushels last fall from what you sent 
me but while I was away from home last spring 
about two bushels of it got mixed with the 
other barley by mistake so I only had about 
one bushel left for seed. I expect to have 
quite a lot from that one bushel. A friend 
of mine from the East declares it to be winter 
barley — the same as they have in the Eastern 
States. I sowed a few handfuls last fall and it 
stood the winter as well a3 anyone could wish. 

Janistiille, Lassen Co., Cal. G. R. W. 

Death of a Contributor — We are grieved 
to hear of the death of Miss Alice R. Hinde, 
daughter of G. R. and Hannah Hinde, of Ana- 
heim, C*l. Miss Hinde wrote occasionally for 
the Young Folks' Column of the Rural under 
the initials "A. R. H." She was quite young, 
but earnest and aspiring in her work. Her 
death was sudden and caused by disease of the 
heart. We tender our siucere sympathy and 
condolence to her bereaved family. 



St. Matthew's Hall. — Readers should not 
overlook the announcement of St. Matthew's 
Hall in this week's Rural. This school for 
young men and boys has recently been enlarged 
to cope with the increasing patronage which 
it has received, which is as fair a testimonial of 
its quality as cquld be given. Rev. Dr. 
A. L. Brewer is one of our best known educa- 
tors. The catalogue, which is sent on applica- 
tion, gives full description and other informa- 
tion about the school. 



Does Not Expect to (Jet Alonc Without 
it. — G. R. W., a Rural subscriber in Lassen 
county, writes: " I would be very sorry to 
miss a single number of your valuable paper. 
I never expect to be able to get along without 
it as long as I can raise money enough to pay 
the subscription." 



Rapid Hay Baling. 

J. D. Martin, Esq., of Mountain View, Santa 
Clara Co., whose sons are running one of the 
new Junior Monarch hay-presses made by 
Jacob Price, at San Leandro, reports the follow- 
ing extraordinary feat of baling with that ma- 
chine on the ranch of C. Castro, a mile and a 
half from town. 

Monday, June 29, 198 bales, 40,930 pounds — 
about 23 V z tons. 

Tuesday, June 30, 196 bales, 46,455 pounds— 
23 # tons. 

Wednesday, July 1, 165 bales, 35,985 pounds- 
17X tons. 

Thursday, July 2, 170 bales, 41,070 pounds- 
20^ tons. 

Friday, July 3, 222 bales, 52,860 pounds — 26^ 
tons nearly. 

Total for 5 days 951 bales, 111 tons, 1,300 
pounds. The average weight of the bales was 
235 pounds. The press that baled the above is 
an upright, 8 feet high, the bale chamber being 
at the top. It is fed at the bottom. It uses 
rope or w ire and employs three men and one 
horse and does its own tramping. We invite 
reports from other presses that have accom- 
plished more or as much per man. 

Windmills- 

We are pleased to call attention to Morton it Ken- 
nedy's Enterprise windmills, advertised elsewhere in 
this paper. The wheel of this mill is without joint 
or pivot, made with hardwood arms, bolted into a 
strong cast-iron spider or hub, hard wood circles 
into which the fan slats are securely fastened, the 
whole being firmly bolted together, and forming the 
strongest and most durable wheel known. All other 
features of this mill are equally commendable, but 
cannot be given in this brief notice. Messrs. Mor- 
ton &. Kennedy, of I.ivermore, Alameda Co., Cal., 
will be pleased to send circulars and full information 
.0 any address upon application. 



6[ntomologi©al-. 



Los Angeles Horticultural Commission. 

The Los Angeles county horticultural com- 
mission is organized and at work. They have 
issued their first bulletin and as it contains 
poiuts of interest to all in the fruit business or 
in inventions for bug destruction we print it as 
follows: This commission is fully authorized 
to deal with all cases that may be reported, 
and urge every good citizen who knows of the 
existence of any such injurious insects to imme- 
diately report in writing to us, that we may 
act according to law. 

Section 4 of the ordinance adopted by the 
Board of Supervisors, and the same as section 
2 of an act to promote the horticultural inter- 
ests of the State, approved March 4, 1881, 
•says: 

It shall be the duty of the County Board of Hor- 
ticultural Commissioners whenever they shall be in- 
formed by complaint in writing of any person 
residing in said county that an orchard, nursery, 01 
trees or any place in their jurisdiction is infested 
with scale, bug, codlin moth, red spider, or other 
noxious insect (liable to spread contagion dangerous 
to the trees or fruit of the complainant) or their 
eggs or larv,-e injurious to fruit or fruit trees, they 
shall cause inspection to be made of the said prem- 
ises, and if found infected they shall etc., etc. 

In short the Commissioners shall take such 
steps as are required by law for the suppression 
of all insect pests so reported. All such com- 
munications reporting insect pests are not for 
public use, and will be kept only for the use 
of the Commissioners. Will the people do 
their duty by at once making known all in- 
fected places, as directed in above section 4? 

We also want to coriespond with men (or 
have them call at our office) who are willing to 
invest a few hundred dollars in spraying outfits, 
to whom good wages and steady work will be 
most sure. Also wanted plans for a steam- 
power spraying machine, which a customer 
stands ready to purchase. Also wanted com- 
munications from persona who have trees, few 
or many, who wish them cleaned of scale. 
The Commissioners invite the hearty co-opera- 
tion of all citizens who have an interest in the 
future welfare of horticulture in this county. 
Address communications, Horticultural Com- 
mission, Los Angeles. 

Grasshopper Poison. 

A similar preparation to that of Mr. Coquillet 
which we gave in last week's Rural is one 
which has been used with good results at Na- 
toma during the last three weeks, but the 
method of application is a little different. Mr. 
Piatt wrifies to the Record Union as follows: 
Take five pounds middlings, which mix thor- 
oughly with one pound arsenic: then dilute one- 
half pint molasses with one gallon water, and 
moisteu the middlings and arsenic with this, 
but do not make it too wet, as otherwise it is 
more likely to bake and harden in the sun. This 
mixture we drop on small pieces of boards, 
shingles or shake, and deposit these along our 
roads and avenues, preferring this method to 
dropping a spoonful under each vine, in order 
to keep the mixture as far away from the vines 
as possible, and as it will draw the hoppers for 
quite a long distance it is just as effective. We 
have Jused the above remedy for about three 
weeks, and have found it to be sure death to 
any hopper that has eaten of it. Wherever we 
have used it dead hoppers are lying around in 
all directions. 

Grasshopper Poisoning at Fresno. 

The Fresno "Republican says that the bran, 
middlings, molasses, arsenic prescription for tho 
grasshopper is such a success in that neighbor- 
hood, that, according to the reports of local 
druggists, "over 70,000 pounds of arsenic have 
been sold and contracted for during the past 
week." That is a heap of arsenic. 

Dust for the Pear Slug. 

Editors Press: — Two or three years since a 
subscriber gave a sample remedy for the pear 
slue. It has been of great service to me. 

Throw the loose dirt about the tree upon it: 
the dust adheres to the leaf-destroyer and he 
quits at once. The remedy is always at hand 
where the soil is kept stirred. This seems to 
be a year for them. In my little orchard of 50 
Bartletts I stopped them in an hour. .1. T. 
Hoyt, San Ma'.to. 

This is quite true. When the orchard lies 
near a county road it will sometimes be worth 
while to gather the tine dust from the roadway. 
It is so much finer than the soil near the trees 
that one does not have to handle so much soil 
to accomplish the desired result. 



A Dangerous Enemy. 

Wc cannot toocarnc-tly Urge the necessity of using the 
Compound Oxygen Vitalizing Treatment of Dffei Starkey 
& Palen, 1109 Uirard atree*, Philadelphia, in the i/erj 
commencement »>f Pulmonary trouble and before the dis- 
ease has made serious inroads upon the system and re- 
duced its (lower to contend with so dangerous an enemy. 
If your cough is he oming troublesome, if you are be- 
ginning to iose tlesh or strength, ami have night-sweats, 
send at once to l>rs. Starkey & l'alen for such documents 
ami reports of eases as will enable you to understand the 
nature and action of their treat ment. 

Orders for the Compound Oxygen Home Treatment 
will be lilleil by 11. K. Mathews, 0:1 Powell street, bet 
Hush and Pine, San Francisco. 

Litton Sprincs ( loiXBOB, — The announce- 
ment of Litton Springs College appears in our 
educational column. In the matter of rural 
aurroundinga and agricultural adjuncts this in- 
stitution ia quite unique, and its reputation for 
acholarahip and care of pupils ia well estab- 
lished. 



•J6 



fACIFie RURAb pRESS. 



[July 11, 1885 




Pull Your Own Weeds. 

If vou've weeds in your garden, my dear friend, I 
pray. 

Do not stand looking over the fence 
To your neighbor's domain— just over the way — 

Your weeds are the most consequence. 
L'proot them while yet there is daylight to work; 

Tear them up, seed and branch, from your soil; 
They are sure to do mischief, so pray do not shirk, 

You'll be amply repaid for your toil. 

The advice would apply to the garden of life — 

'Tis so seldom we see our own weeds — 
For watching our neighbor, or worse yet, his wife, 

And counting their many misdeeds, 
We pass our own follies, our faults we disguise, 

In the garments of selfish conceit. 
We're ever perfection, (in our own eyes,) 

Our neighbors may take a back seat. 

Let us pull our own weeds and work with a will, 

While yet there is one to be found, 
Nor point o'er the way in derision until 

We've carefully tiU'd our own giound. 
For watching the faults of others we see 

Not the ones in our own hearts so rife; 
I. et us pull for ourselves— let others' weeds be 

Till we clean our own garden of life. 

Selfishness Unveiled. 

[Written for Kir a l Prbks by Clara BrAUMM Brows. I 
"Wait a moment, Charles -you're in audi a 
hurry to go down town now-a-days! A bill 
came in last night that must be settled right 
away, I suppose, for the dressmaker sends a 
note with it that I call positively rude. She 
insists on immediate payment, and threatens 
not to do any more work for me impudent 
creature!" 

"Oh, Addie, I hoped you had beeu more 
careful about contracting bills since I explained 
to you how hard it is to get along on the salary 
that I receive. You really must retrench." 

"I'm sure J har* been very prudent," de- 
clared Addie Merrick, in an injured tone. "I 
think its too bad of you to rind fault with me 
just because I've had a decent dress made, 
when you know I look like a fright beside 
Maud Norcross and Belle Anderson and that 
set. Why, those girls have half a dozen dresses 
to my one." 

Charles Merrick's face flushed and hasty 
words trembled upon his lips, but he checked 
them. Addie was his only sister, and he would 
not remind her that the stylish girls of whom 
she spoke were not dependent upon a hard- 
working brother's small earnings. Hut his 
voice shook as he said, "I don't wish to tind 
fault with you, Addie, and you know I would 
like to see you dressed as well as any other lady; 
but, unfortunately, my means will not per- 
mit of it. It is absolutely necessary for us 
both to practice the closest economy. (Jive me 
the bill and I'll try to settle it, somehow, 
though 1 don't see my way clear now. I must 
hurry, or I shall be late good-by!" 

The front door was opened and closed in a 
trice and the sound of the young man's quick, 
decided footsteps soon died away down the 
quiet street. Addie Merrick stood gazing 
moodily out of the window, a curve of dis- 
content marring the outline of her pretty 
mouth. It was dreadfully mortifying, she 
thought, to be hopelessly poor, to see people no 
better than she enjoying everything that she 
would like and appreciate, and be doomed by 
stern and cruel Fate to a pittance grudgingly 
doled out by a brother. It was very hard and 
not at all what she deserved; and the self-pity- 
ing solilcquy ended in tears. 

To bear out the truth of an old saying, the 
young lady's left ear ought to have been of a 
roseate hue about this time: for, in another 
breakfast room, in another part of the town 
of Shandon, a very animated discussion was 
going on in which the name of Miss Addie 
Merrick was conspicuous. "I do think its a 
sin and a shame," asserted a lively black-eyed 
maiden, "for that lazy girl to live off her 
brother the way she does." 

"Softly, my dear," rebuked a mild-faced 
matron; "you shouldn't call anyone names." 

"But it's enough to distract anyone that's 
sensible, and not steeped from head to foot in 
double-distilled selfishness, to see how things 
are going," maintained the daughter. "Charlie 
Merrick is just killing himself, and for what? 
Ask Jennie if it is to pave the way for iratri 
monial bliss, or to keep a lady sister with white 
hands in the parlor, when she isn't airing her 
Hnery out in public. Well, Jennie, what do 
you say?" 

"Keally, Belle, I do not care to say much 
about it," quietly remarked a delicate blonde, 
who sat toying rather absent-mindedly with her 
teaspoon. But for an unusual flush upon her 
cheek, one might have thought her totally in- 
different to the subject under discussion. 

"< 'h, pretence is all very well, my haughty 
little lady, said Belle, with a saucy nod of her 
curly head, "but don't think to deceive me. 



And, furthermore, allow me to say, coz, that 
you've treated Charlie downright shabbily of 
late, and I'm not so stupid but 1 know the rea- 
son why. He's given you reason to think he 
would be glad to have you become Mrs. Mer- 
rick, and yet he hasn't put the question, fair 
and square." 

"Oh, hush, Belle; you are really imperti- 
nent," murmured .lennie, now decidedly rosy, 
and intently scauning the pattern of her nap- 
kin; while Mrs. Anderson gazed aghast at her 
dauntless child. 

"Now, you ought to know very well why he 
doesn't propose," continued Bell, "and you 
ought to have some consideration for his feel- 
ings, instead of congealing into an icicle the 
way you have the last two weeks, and snubbing 
him every chance you get." 

"My dear child, how can you?" interposed 
Mrs. Anderson. 

"Oh, it's gospel truth, and if -lennie don't 
know it, she ought to be made to realize it, for 
men like Charlie Merrick don't come along 
every day." 

"There, there, cousin, I've half a mind to be 
jealous, but it would be absurd as long as you 
spend an hour a day writing to Fort Grant, and 
the letter carrier comes here on every round." 

Now it was Belle's turn to blush, which she 
did furiously, then plunged with renewed reck- 
lessness into the subject of Addie Merrick's ex- 
travagance and her brother's cramped means. 

As she had asseverated, Charles had paid de- 
voted court to the fair-faced Jennie Boring, who 
was making her relatives, the Andersons, an ex- 
tended visit, her home being in a city 50 miles 
distant. Though only a bookkeeper for Leeds 
& Co, prominent grocers, he was a young man 
of good figure, tine featui e I and unexc -ption il 
habits, deservedly popular with the young 
ladies of Shandon, and there seemed nothing in- 
appropriate in his gallant attentions to the 
sweet-faced city girl, until Miss Jennie herself 
took umbrage at his continued silence on a topic 
which she felt he was in duty bound, from the 
unmistakably lover-like bearing he had assumed 
toward her, to introduce, l'roper respect for 
her position in the eyes of the public, she said to 
nefself, required that he should be explicit if 
their acquaintance were to continue. As his 
eyes continued to look love into hers, on the oc- 
casions when they met, but his lips remained 
obstinately closed on the all-important subject 
of matrimony, Jennie adopted anew regi m e 
and plunged her lover in the depths of despair 
by a systematic avoidance of him whenever pos 
sible, and an air of hauteur when forced by cir- 
cumstances into his company. She knew that 
Belle was probably right in her conjecture as to 
the cause of his non-committal conduct, and at 
times she admired him for being such a devoted 
brother, and so nobly endeavoring to till the 
places made vacant by the death of his parents. 
So faithful a brother would surely make an ex- 
emplary husband- here her cheeks always tin- 
gled and she was wont to put an abrupt end to 
her reverie. 

To a casual observer Addie Merrick appeared 
a very pleasing youn^- lady. When in society 
mer face was an attractive one, wreathed in 
smiles, her speech was animated and witty, and 
her manners were easy. She would have been 
a general favorite but for her illy-concealed 
aversion to anything that might be called labor, 
and her deliberate indulgence in a mode of life 
not justified by the finances of the brother upon 
whom she was absolutely dependent. It was 
her absorbing ambition to "make as good an 
appearance" as any of the ladies with whom she 
associated, and, like too many misguided mor- 
tals, did not realize that it was the enclosed 
jewel, and not the sheltering casket, which is 
of true value. If she had relied upon her own 
exertions for the many little luxuries which she 
considered indispensable, had honestly and ear- 
nestly gone out into the world, as any lady may 
go in this enlightened age, and delved with her 
own hands that her lot aud that of her faithful 
brother might be made brighter, she would have 
commanded the respect of all the truly sensible 
people of Shandon. Helping hands had been 
extended to her after it had become evident 
that nothing could be saved from the wreck of 
James Merrick's property. Kind hearts felt a 
desire to do something to assist the orphan girl 
to earn a livelihood. A busy dressmaker of- 
fered to instruct her in the arts of the trade, 
but Miss Merrick replied that she positively 
could not sew —it hurt her eyes. A friend asked 
if she would act as governess to her two little 
girls, promising to do all in her power to 
make the position a pleasant one; but Miss Mer- 
rick's nerves were too easily unstrung to per- 
mit of her assuming the companionship of chil- 
I dren. Then Mr. May hew, the dry goods mer- 
chant, who had held her father in high esteem, 
suggested that if she would come into his store 
she would doubtless be assigned ere long one of 
the best places among the saleswomen. That 
fairly shocked the young lady. Go into a 
store, indeed ! Never ! except as a customer. 
And so it went on; nothing suited Miss Mer- 
rick's fastidious ideas. She came to the con- 
clusion that she Utould take up some occupation 
provided it were adapted to her tastes and 
breeding— something not too laborious and in 
every way irreproachable; but an opportunity 
of this kind failed to come to hand, and, mean- 
while, her no less cultured, but thoroughly un- 
selfish brother accepted the first position that 
was tendered him— that of bookkeeper in a 
grocery store and allowed no vain regrets, or 
aching back and brain to swerve him from hia 
duty. 

Addie accepted his unceasing care as a matter 
of course, conscious only that the best he could 



do for her fell far short of what she required to 
render her life thoroughly enjoyable. It never 
occurred to her that Charles was destroy ing his 
own chances for future happiness in devoting 
his energies and income to her comfort; that he 
ought to be making some provision for the 
maintenance of a wife and children, instead of 
expending every dollar, as fast as earned, in 
supplying what she was pleased to designate 
her needs. Her own union with some gentle- 
man of means, who would support her in the 
style essential to her happiness, was a possible 
contingency of the future which she could har- 
bor in her mind with complacency; and she 
considered it no more than her brother's duty 
to support her until that auspicious event 
should occur. But her eyes were to be opened, 
after several years of this blind selfishness. 

A long, hot summer sapped the vitality from 
even robust frames, and dealt mercilessly with 
the overworked and poveity-stricken. Con- 
siderable sickness prevailed in the ordinarily 
healthy town of Shandon. Through all the 
sultry days, and frequently far into the op- 
pressive nights, Charles Merrick toiled per- 
sistently over his books and some copying 
which he had obtained from a law firm to eke 
out the income that, strive as he would, did 
not prove adequate for the demands made upon 
it. Friends meeting him hurrying along the 
streets began to expostulate with him for dis- 
regarding the warnings of an overtasked sys- 
tem. More noticeable even than the marks of 
extreme fatigue which his countenance bore 
was an expression of mental suffering, the more 
telling in its effects that it remained unspoken. 

It was a hard blow to him when he learned 
that Jennie luring had suddenly returned to 
her distant home, and realized that she had 
gone irrecoverably out of his life. He was 
fully sensible of the vast gulf that lay between 
her and himself — a gulf which even love could 
scarcely span without the supports requisite for 
daily subsistence. - He had done wrong in 
courting her society so sedulously, in revealing, 
as he felt he had done, the feelings she had in- 
spired, since, even in his wildest flights of 
fancy, he could not consider himself justified in 
proposing marriage. But human nature is 
weak, and Jennie kad been irresistibly capti- 
vating. Charles was not coBceited, but he had 
felt certain that his regaid, had won some re 
sponse; for Jennie was no coquette, and her 
manner toward him had ever been character- 
ized by a sweetness, a simplicity and cordial 
interest, not manifested toward the other gen- 
tlemen of her acquaintance. That is. until the 
last few weeks of her stay, when she had be- 
come cold and distant, refusing persistently to 
accord him any attention not absolutely de- 
minded by the usages of society. This decided 
change had cut Charles to the heart. More 
than once he had been on the point of casting 
discretion to the winds and pouring forth a des- 
perate confession of his thoughts aud desires 
he could not say hopes, for there was no hope. 
If she were poor, as well as himself, he might 
have dared to ask her, provided she returned 
his love, to wait for him while he strove to 
work his way out of his present difficulties un- 
til he could offer her the frugal home which was 
all he could hope ever to attain. But she was 
the petted daughter of wealthy parents— she 
had never done a day's work in her life— it 
would have been the hight of madness to have 
asked her to link her bright, beautiful life with 
Ins care-burdened one. And, while he fought 
the battle over and over, resolving one day that 
he would never see her again, and the next day 
eagerly seeking her presence, she quietly left 
Shandon without a word of farewell to him. 

Then Charles plunged more recklessly than 
ever into exhausting labor, and soon became a 
shadow of his former self, thin and wan and 
spiritless, except when engaged with nerves at 
strong tension in his daily duties. Addie 
remarked a change in his demeanor, and 
thought him looking rather thin, but was far 
from divining the true state of affairs, attribu- 
ting it all to the protracted sultriness of the 
season, which she declared was "reducing her 
to a skeleton," as she lay back languidly in an 
easy chair, or reclined upon a lounge, novel in 
hand, while a stout maid servant kept the 
house in order; for Addie had never taken upon 
herself tasks which she considered totally unfit 
for her delicate constitution. Scrub floors, wash 
pots and kettles with those white hands — pre- 
posterous! And it was equally out of the ques- 
tion for her to ruin her complexion over a blaz- 
ing cooking stove, therefore Bridget was a ne- 
cessity. 

She was quite unprepared for the emergency 
when, on one of the most trying days of the 
season, her brother was brought home from the 
store in a hack, wild with fever. She could only 
stand horror-stricken, wringing her hands, 
while he was conveyed, struggling and protest- , 
ing with all his frenzied might, up the stairs to ! 
his room. Days and weeks of intense anxiety 
followed, when the over-wrought brain of the 
sick man ran riot, and Addie Merrick, as she 
prayed for the life of her brother, learned a 
bitter lesson. Words which, even when most 
tried, he had never addressed to her came thick j 
and fast now through his swollen, parched lips. 
"Addie, Addie," the cry would sometimes be, I 
"you are not doing right. I love you, dear; I | 
want to help you, but I'm poor. I cannot give 
you everything. You must put i/our shoulder 
to the wheel." 

Again, "Oh, my darling, my darling Jennie! 
if I could only offer you a home! My heart is 
yours, all yours; but, alas, what else do I pos- 
sess? I cannot turn my sister adrift — oh, why 
does she not try to help herself ?" 



From these and similar ravings Addie by de- 
grees came to understand the situation fully — 
| her brother's self-abnegation and rare devotion 
to her, his hopeless attachment to Miss Loring, 
I and her own blind selfishness; and, when she 
, finally accepted the fact that never had woman 
been more completely and inexcusably heartless 
than she, her state of mind was most unenvia- 
' ble. It is not necessary to trace the workings 
of her awakened conscience — Addie Merrick 
had a conscience, after all, and she suffered 
keenly from its reproaches while Charles lay 
fighting the grim specter of I >eath that hovered 
| by his bedside. The gruff old doctor shook his 
I head ominously, friends came and went in sad 
silence, their eyes speaking what their lips re- 
: frained from uttering as they gazed upon the 
j n nhappy sister. That gaze was clearly inter- 
: preted by Addie, and she could not deny its 
justice, although her very soul shrank from 
i this public realization of her wrong-doing. It 
! did not take her long after reviewing the past 
in this new light, to make up her mind in re- 
gard to her future course. But she trembled for 
| fear that her atonement could never be made — 
Charles was desperately ill, and might die, 
i despite their strenuous endeavors to allay the 
severity of his disease. Years had passed since 
I she had offered up a prayer to God — a gentle 
mother's teachings had been forgotten in the 
petty ambitions that had engrossed her mind — 
but Bhe prayed now, fervently and continually, 
that mercy might be shown her, even though 
she deserved it 1 ot— that her brother's life 
might be spared and she might have the oppor- 
J tunity to do something to promote his happi- 
| ness, to prove to him that, underneath all her 
selfishness there beat a warm, sisterly heart. 
In this mood she wrote a letter and posted it 
with her own hands. It was addressed to Miss 
Jennie Loring, care of Stephen Loring, Fay- 
ville. 

(Concluded Sext Wiek.) 



Cordelia's Story. 

Flora F.ushnell was an only child, who had 
been petted and indulged in every way until 
the refusal of a request would be felt like a 
blow. It had come at last, and she was in a 
rebellious mood one morning, when Cordelia 
came in with flowers to fill the vases. Mrs. 
Phelps — or Cordelia, as she was called — was a 

' remarkable character. She had come to the 
ISushnell home well recommended as a house- 
keeper, and proved a most efficient person, 

] although subject to strange fits of melancholy 
and of humor. She remained an unusually 
long time in the purlor to day, all the while 
earnestly regarding her young mistress. Flora 
at last became impatient of her delay, and 
sharply inquired if she were not through, when 
she clasped her hands, and answered earnestly: 
"No, my dear young lady, I'm not through; 
for I make so bold as to want to speak to you 
about what's on your mind this morning." 
Flora regarded her scornfully, without deign- 
ing a reply. "I know you're thinking about an 
elopement, miss, for I heard what Robert Pres- 
ton said when you parted on the veranda 
last night." 

"So you play eavesdropper and spy upon my 
movements, do you ?" said Flora, sternly. "No, 
Miss Flora; but I was looking on the lawn for 
your mamma's handkerchief, last evening, and 
I supposed you knew I was there until I heard 
w hat was said, and then I knew I was unseen." 
"I presume you did your duty , and informed my 
parents," sneered Flora. ''Indeed, miss, I did 
not; but I would like to talk with you about 
it. I know you have set your heart on having 
Robert Preston for your husband, and that 
your papa and mamma will not consent to the 
marriage. Will you let me tell you a story, 
miss ?" Flora was afraid to offend Cordelia, now 
that she was acquainted with her secret plans, 
so she said, "You may go on." 

"I know what it is to run away and get mar- 
ried, for I did it. I was an only child, like 
yourself, and had a good home, with everything 
comfortable, for my father was a farmer, and 
owued the finest farm in our neighborhood. I 
was perfectly contented with my lot until John 
Phelps came one winter to teach our district 
school. I was called pretty and rich, and so it 
wasn't long before the teacher began to flatter, 
court, and make love to nie. Of course I lost 
my heart, and, deeming him perfection, would 
have followed him to the end of the world. 
When spring came and he was going away he 
asked father if he might have me for bis wife. 
My father was a proud, cold man, and was 
often harsh and severe toward those he didn't 
like, and he had never liked John Phelps. Then he 
was ambitious for me, because he thought me 
handsome and smart. So, when the teacher 
asked him if he might marry me he said "No," 
with characteristic sternness, and forbade him 
the house. I was indignant and resentful, and 
would not listen to reason or be comforted. 
I sulked around the house, making myself and 
every one else miserable. A few days after I 
had parted with my lover, I went one evening 
at sunset into the old schoolhouse to indulge 
my sorrows, and dream of him. I took my old 
seat, and, dropping my head on the desk in 
front of me, I sobbed aloud. Oh, the joy and 
sorrow that had come into my life with the 
winter just gone! My weeping died away in 
faint echoes as a hand touched my shoulder, 
and I looked up to tind my lover at my elbow, 
instead of miles away, as 1 supposed. He had 
stayed at the village awaiting an opportunity 



July 11, 1885.] 



f ACIFI6 RURAL) p>RESS. 



27 



of speaking to me. Oh, how happy I was at 
seeing him again and he, taking advantage of 
the sentimental mood in which he found me 
persuaded me to elope with him that evening. 
We drove to the village five miles away, and 
were married by a justice. The train that night 
bore us away to the city, 100 miles distant, 
where we arrived just as a chill, gray dawn was 
ushering in a rainy April day. The sentimental 
romance of the night had fled and a dreary sense 
of homesick longing filled my heart, which 
even the presence of my new husband could 
not dispel. He took me to his home, a dingy, 
comfortless house on the outskirts of the town, 
where I learned for the first time that he had a 
mother and sister depending on him for sup- 
port. They were respectful toward me, but 
had no welcome for the intruder until he 
whispered to them that my father was wealthy 
and they should be provided for, I was so un- 
fortunate as to hear w hat he said, and no words 
can express my wretchedness and despair. Bit- 
terly did I repent my folly as I threw myself 
on the bed in my room and sobbed out my 
misery like a little child. When my father dis- 
covered my flight, and with whom I had gone, 
he fell in a fit of apoplexy, from which he never 
recovered, and I never saw him again. His 
executor robbed my mother of all she had, oblig- 
ing her to seek a home with her brother in the 
far West, all the fruits of my folly and disobed- 
ience. My husband was a weak man, indolent 
and aimless, possessing none of the manly at- 
tributes of one who appreciates the great re- 
sponsibilities of life, He was disappointed when 
my mother lost her property, and was not 
always kind to me. 

"My husband's health had been failing for 
some time, and when we had been married ten 
years he died, leaving me with two children to 
support, boys of 7 and 9 years. I tried oh, so 
hard, to live with and work for them, but I be- 
came ill. As I grew better I was persuaded by 
the friends who took care of me during my ill- 
ness, to put my children in an orphan asylum. 
Oh, my dear girl, profit by my experience and 
listen to your parents; be guided by them, that 
your future be not filled with remorse, despair 
and grief." 

Flora, who had for some time been quietly 
weeping, took the hand of the poor woman and 
said: "I thank you, Cordelia, for telling me the 
story of your life, and I promise you I will 
never marry anyone without the consent of my 
parents." 

And Flora kept her word. She is now a 
cherished wife and happy mother, but her hus- 
band's name is not Robert Preston. 



218,264 Miles of Cigars. — The number of 
cigars reported made in the United States last 
year, was 3,457,309,017. At an average length 
of four inches, these cigars laid end to end 
would extend 218,204 miles, or nearly nine 
times around the world; or nearly out to the 
moon. This number equals 62 cigars for every 
man, women and child (infants included) in the 
United States. Besides the cigars, nearly a 
thousand million (994,334,000) cigarettes were 
reported made, which at three inches long, laid 
end to end, would reach over 47,000 miles, the 
combined length of the cigars and cigarettes 
being over 365,000 miles, or a thousand miles 
for every day in the year. At three cents 
each for the cigars, and one cent each for the 
cigarettes, they would be worth over $112,000,- 
000. — Prairie Farmer. 



'Y'OUJ^G JE{0LKS' CfoLUJvlN. 



The Puzzle Box. 

Reversals. 

1. By reversing to exist form wickedness. 

2. By reversing a ship's timber form light blows. 

3. By reversing a kind of fish form a tatter. 

4. By reversing to boast form raiment. 

5. By reversing a certain locality form summits. 

Uncle Ben. 

Two-Word Charade. 

To be charged with my first excites the ire, 
And coldness brings between good friends; 
Charged with my second adds but fire • 
To my first, and never offends. 
My whole is a mythical place and a book, 
For whose author across the sea you may look. 

Grace. 

Riddle. 

It is owned by the poor man, wanted by the rich 
man, loved by the miser more than his gold, and 
esteemed by the Christian as greater than his Maker. 

Claude. 

Palindrome. 

If you should meet a person afflicted with a cer- 
tain terrible disease, what would be your most nat- 
ural action ? (The answer should be a phrase which 
will read alike backward or forward.) 

Anagrams of Cities. 

1. Uses a cry. 

2. Thro' Ceres. 

3. Yes, catch Ned. 

4. Trace men so. Mayflower. 

Answers to Last Puzzles. 
A Military Puzzle. — * * * 



RIDDLE. — A splinter. 
Mythological Acrostic— J uno. 

rania. 

P amphos. 
I ris. 

T erpsichore. 
)i uphrosyne. 
R nodes. 

Blanks. — r. Daisy, aisy. 2. Cone, one. 
Numerical. — Marigold. 



A Divine Asks an Impressive Question. — 
A distinguished Boston divine, of unusually 
solemn and impressive appearance, went out 
to a country town not long ago to lecture. He 
arrived early in the afternoon, and all the 
town, of course, "spotted" him within five 
minutes as a very great and very saintly man. 

He went into a drug store and, in tones that 
froze the young blood of the clerk behind the 
counter, said: 

"Young — man — do — you — smoke?" 

"Y — Yes, sir," said the trembling clerk; "I'm 
sorry, but I learned the habit young and haven't 
been able to quit it yet." 

"Then," said the great divine, wiihout the 
movement of a muscle or the abatement of a 
shade of the awful solemnity of his voice, "can 
you tell me where I can get a good cigar?" — 
Boston Olobe. 



Origin of Crazy Quilts. — "Crazy" patch- 
work originated in the following manner: A 
certain titled lady while learning embroidery 
in an English seminary lost her mind, and it be- 
came necessary to confine her in a private mad- 
house. But she still retained her passion for 
needlework and spent most of her time in uniting 
pieces of material furnished her from the mad- 
house scrap-bag. Although unable to perform 
the difficult stitches of embroidery work, it was 
noticed that in joining the odds and ends of ma- 
terial given her she invariably used contrasting 
or assimilating colors of thread or silk and that 
nearly every stitch was different from the 
others. Specimens of her work found their 
way outside of the asylum and since then mil- 
lions of women, apparently sane, have found 
delight in imitating the handiwork of the crazy 
countess. 



In Cuba, when the Government wants to 
discipline an editor it suspends his paper for 
40 days. This is great fun for the editor. He 
gets a rest, goes fishing, has a good time gen- 
erally, and his subscribers can't recover a cent 
for the papers they didn't get. — Burlimjlon 
Free Press. 



The Captain's Story. 

"Say, captain, do you want a boy?" 

The old captain looked up, and fixed his keen 
blue eyes on the boy who stood before him. 

"What do you want to go to sea for?" he 
asked. 

"To have a good time," answered the boy, 
promptly. 

"W hat's your name?" asked the captain. 
"Willie Harrison." 

"Do your father and mother know you are 
going to sea?" asked the captain. 

The boy's face flushed. He hung his head, 
and did not answer the last question. 

"I thought as much," said the captain, read- 
ing his answer in the boy's face. "You look to 
me like a boy that was running away from 
home. Now, you have probably been reading 
books about sailors that have made you believe 
they have nothing but an easy time and lots of 
fun. These books have said nothing about hard 
work and s'.orms. If you will take my advice, 
my boy, you will go right back home again, 
and not leave it again in this way. Wait till 
you are older and wiser before you decide on 
your calling for life. When 1 was a boy about 
your size I did the same thing. I ran away 
from home, and shipped on a vessel without 
telling my mother what I meant to do. I left 
a note telling her that I would write when we 
reached a port. I thought it would be a grand 
thing to be a sailor, but I was soon undeceived. 
We had scarcely left port before I would have 
given anything in the world to get home again. 
I had plenty of hard work to do, with many a 
taste of the rope's end if I failed to please. Sick 
or well, I had to work, and even when I did my 
best the mate swore at me for a lazy lubber. I 
used to cry myself to sleep many a night think- 
ing of my home and the dear mother I ran 
away from. I knew what a foolish boy I had 
been, but that did not help the matter. 

"At last there came a terrible storm. The 
waves seemed to me to tower up like moun- 
tains, and they looked as if they would swallow 
us up. Our sails were torn in shreds and the 
masts weie broken. 'We must take to the 
boats,' the captain said, 'she is sinking fast.' 

"The boats were hastily lowered, and then 
the men crowded into them as fast as they 
could, each one pushing forward as fast as pos 
sible, lest there should not be room for all. 

" '(Jive way !' shouted the captain; and the 
men bent to their oars. 

"Don't go without me!" I screamed as I saw 
they had deserted me, but my call was in vain. 
The roar of the storm drowned my voice, and 
the men were too intent on saving themselves 
to heed me. 

"The vessel was very near shore when she 
was wrecked, and I thought perhaps the men 
might have intended to return for me, but as I 
saw the little boats tossing on the waves like 
empty shells, I feared they would not be will- 
ing to face them again to save me. I was 
without friend or helper save One. 

"Very earnestly I prayed that God would 
spare my life and let me see my home again. 

"I saw a wave approaching which looked as 
if it would surely engulf the vessel, and clasp- 
ing an empty hen-coop which was on deck, I 
awaited its coining. I felt it sweep me from 



the deck, and I clung to the coop with all my 
strength, knowing that it would keep me 
afloat at any rate. 

"Two or three times I almost lost my hold, 
but at last my life preserver was thrown upon 
the beach, and kind hands saved me from the 
water. God had answered my prayer and mer- 
cifully spared my life. When I was well 
enough I wrote to my mother, tell'nu her of my 
escape and asking her forgiveness for* leaving 
her. I did not receive an answer, and it was 
some time before I was able to get a passa2e 
home. 

"When at last I reached my native place I 
found the house empty and closed, and weeds 
growing everywhere in the once well kept gar- 
den. My mother had died of a broken heart, 
when, as she supposed, I had perished with the 
wreck. My letter had been too late. 

"Now, my boy, you have heard my story. 
Will you profit by it? Will you take my advice 
and go back to your mother?" 

"Yes, sir," answered Willie. 

The romance he had fancied in a sailor's life 
was offset by the sad story he had just heard, 
and he was sensible enough to profit by it and 
return to his home and his parents before it 
was too late. — Morniwj Star. 



G>OOD J^EALTH. 



Pure Water. 

Editors Press: — Geo. E. Pinder, living in 
the foothills of the Sxnta Cruz mountains near 
Saratoga, says he has hard water at his place, 
and thinks there is much in this country which 
is not so reported. He deems the subject of 
pure water of the very highest importance, and 
has been looking, waiting and hoping to see 
more interest manifested in this subject. 

He attributes much of the impurity of water 
to its use from bad pipes of various metals. 
Many families use water so unfit for use that it 
would seem that the taste alone would, at least, 
justify a suspicion of injurious properties, and 
yet the great majority of such persons continue 
in the use for years and years, without resorting 
to any analysis to ascertain what it is they are 
so constantly taking into their systems, or 
whether it is hurtful or not. He has known of 
cases of sickness and death which were attribu- 
ted to the use of bad water, and yet such cir- 
cumstances generally attracted but temporary 
attention, and little even for the time. 

So much apathy on so important a subject, 
among an intelligent people, would seem to be 
matter for astonishment. Mr. Pinder thinks it 
high time for scientific and philanthropic peo- 
ple to give this matter of pure water a more 
thorough examination, as so much of health and 
life depends upon it. 

Mr. Pinder seems fully alive to this subject, 
and has constructed a cistern of the capacity of 
about $,000 gallons, of circular form, G-£ feet 
deep, 13 feet in diameter, and expects by 
draining the rainfall from 700 feet house roof 
surface to keep supplied with plenty of good 
fresh water. G. McD. 

Santa Clara Co. 



Food for the Nervous Person. — A dis 
tinguished physician says that he is disposed to 
exclude vegetables, with the exception of cere- 
als and a little fruit, entirely from the dietary 
of nervous persons. Animal food is more nutri- 
tious to the nervous system and to the body 
generally than a vegetable diet. It has all the 
elements for the formation of the tissues of the 
body,, and is easily digested. Men can exist on 
it in any climate. Of meats, beef is by far the 
best. Pork is good for nervous persons, but is 
not easily digested. Wild game is excellent. 
Fish is good food for nervous people. Eggs 
boiled just enough to harden the white are eas- 
ily digested. It is a mistake about people eat- 
ing too much. The majority do not eat enough. 
Nervous dyspensia comes from working too 
hard and not eating enough. When a man be- 
gins to suffer from overwork he should eat 
plenty of good bread and butter, drink two 
quarts of milk a day, and eat plenty of good 
meat. When such a person resorts to a vege- 
table diet, he grows weaker and loses his nerve 
power. Man was made to eat meat, and he 
never will flourish on a vegetable diet. 



Epithelioma. — General Grant's disease is 
termed epithelioma or true cancer. It is a 
tumor caused by the morbid growth of epithel- 
ial tissue. This is the tissue that covers or 
lines all cavities of the body with an external 
opening, no matter how small. The mouth and 
throat .are examples, and the covering or lining 
of these parts is an epithelial tissue. It may be 
caused by long-continued irritation of the part, 
such as would be caused by smoking, drinking, 
or the use of highly spiced articles of food. An 
epithelioma is one of the various forms of can- 
cer, and is more or less mclignant. Were Gen- 
eral Grant's tumor on the external covering of 
the body it could be removed with safety. 

Good News for Hungry Folk. — A physician 
says that wakefulness is oftentimes merely a 
symptom of hunger. Gratify the desire, and 
sleep ensues. The feeble will be stronger if 
they eat on going to bed. Some persons are 
exhausted merely by the process of making 
their toilet in the morning. A cup of warm 
milk and toast on retiring, or of beef tea on 
awakening, will correct it. 



X)oMESTie Gfeoj^OM 



English Apple Tart. — An English apple 
tart is not a bad thing, and differs from the 
American pie in that it has no undercrust. It 
should be made in a deep dish. Don't accept 
the recognized formula, "peel and quarter the 
apples," for they are not half so nice that way 
as when finely sliced, the finer the better. 
Have enough to fill the dish quite up. Grate 
a little lemon peel over them and mix a good 
spoonful of sugar in a little water and pour 
over the apples. Put an inverted egg-cup in 
the center; it will keep the crust up and keep 
the juice in at the same time. Make a puff 
paste by allowing half a pound of butter to a 
pound of flour. Hub two ounces of the butter 
into the Hour after putting in a teaspoonful of 
salt and one of baking powder. Mix with 
water and roll out lightly. Everybody does 
not know that pastry is lighter if mixed with a 
knife instead of the hand and rolled with a 
glass bottle instead of a rolling-pin, but such is 
the fact. Having rolled it out once, break the 
butter up into little bits and place them at in- 
tervals upon the paste, sprinkle well with flour 
and roll out again. Repeat this three or four 
times and then carefully lift the paste on to the 
top of the dish, cutting it neatly to fit exactly 
around the rim. 



Boast Veal. — Veal is so dry a meat that a 
moist dressing is almost essential. This dress- 
ing may be made as follows : One pint of fine 
bread or cracker crumbs, in which have been 
mixed dry, one even tablespoonful of salt, and 
one of summer savory or thyme, and one tea- 
spoonful of pepper. Chop one onion very fine, 
and add to it, with one egg well beaten. Melt 
a piece of butter the size of an egg in a cup of 
hot water and pour on the crumbs. If not 
enough to thoroughly moisten them add a little 
more. Instead of butter, quarter of a pound of 
salt pork can be chopped fine, and mixed with 
it. If the loin is used, and this is always best, 
take out the bone to the first joint, and fill the 
cavity with dressing. In using the breast bone 
also, reserve the bones for stock ; lay the dress- 
ing on it ; roll and tie securely. Baste often. 
Three or four thin slices of salt pork may be 
laid on top; or, if this is not liked, melt a table- 
spoonful of butter in a cup of hot water and 
baste with that. Allow a full half-hour to the 
pound, and make the gravy as for beef. 

Fried Scallops. — Drain two dozen scallops 
carefully, and after seasoning them with salt 
and pepper, roll them lightly in fine bread 
crumbs. Beat two eggs in a soup plate with a 
spoon or fork, and after dipping the scallops in 
the egg, roll them in a quantity of crumbs and 
lay them on a large platter. Be careful that 
they do not touch each other. When all have 
been breaded, place in the frying basket as 
many as can be accommodated on the bottom 
and plunge into boiling fat. Care should be 
taken that the fish are thoroughly seasoned 
with salt previous to the breading, and that 
the fat is so hot that blue smoke rises from the 
center. 

Greens. — The leaves and stalks of yonng 
beets, milkweeds, dandelions, and narrow dock 
are useful as food in the early spring, chiefly 
for the water and alkaline salts which they con- 
tain. They should be picked over and washed 
carefully, cooked in boiliug sal'ed water until 
tender, then drained, and seasoned with butter 
and salt. Vinegar is often used with them as a 
desirable condiment. Dandelions should be 
cooked in plenty of water ; but other tender 
greens may be cooked, like spinach, in their 
own juices. 



Macaroni Pudding.-- One cupful broken 
macaroni, one and one-half pints milk, four 
eggs, one cupful sugar, one large tablespoon- 
ful butter, one teaspoouful extract vanilla. Boil 
macaroni in well salted water ten minutes, then 
add, to the boiling milk and simmer twenty 
minutes longer; remove from fire, pour on 
sugar, eggs and butter beaten together, lastly 
add extract; put in well buttered pudding dish, 
bake in steady oven thirty-five minutes and 
serve with sauce. 



Green Pea Soup. — Put two quarts green 
peas with four quarts water, boil two hours, 
keeping steam waste supplied by fresh boiling 
water; strain them from liquor, return them to 
pot, rub the peas through sieve, chop an onion 
fine, add small sprig mint, let boil ten minutes, 
stir a tablespoonful flour into two of butter, 
add pepper and salt to taste, stir smoothly into 
boiling soup. Sarve with well-buttered sippets 
of toasted bread. 



Minced Veal. — Chop cold veal fine, picking 
out all bits of gristle. To a pint bowlful allow 
a Urge cup of boiling water, a tablespoonful of 
butter and one of flour ; a teaspoonful of salt 
and a saltspoonful each of pepper and mace. 
Make a roux with the butter and Hour, and add 
the seasoning ; put in the veal and cook five 
minutes, serving it on buttered toast. 

Stewed Lamp.. — Take the neck or breast, 
cut into small pieces, and put in a stewpati 
with some thinly sliced salt pork and enough 
water to cover it; cover closely and stew until 
tender, skim off the scum, and add a quart of 
green peas, adding more water if necessary; 
when the peas are tender, season with pepper 
and butter rolled with flour. 




PACIFIG RURAlo PRESS. 



Home Markets for Fruit, 

While we are wise in reaching out for dis- 
tant consumers for our fruit it should not be 
forgotten that the home consumption might be 
considerably increased, and in choosing loca- 
tions for orchard planting many small planters 



A. T. KKWEY. 

Published by DEWEY & CO. 



[Jolt 11, 1885 

' come in earlier than U9ual this year, for the | from former meetings, remaining unpublished, 
conditions have favored an early fruit urop all in a handsome volume soon after the meeting, 
around, they will have a better start of the We trust that California will be represented 
Malaya fruit than usual, and if they are prop- at this meeting, either by the commission or by 
erly pushed the Eastern jobbers will be induced some of the many amateurs who are giving at- 
to get them well placed before the foreign crop tention to the subject of forestry in this .State. 

arrives. These facts are leadiug to more liberal I 

can free themselves from the need of new great views among local packers. An item from the Supply and Consumption Of Feed 
markets! because there are new small ones to Riverside Press in another column states that Grains, 
which they can haul their fruit and deal directly six cents per pound is offered for the fruit in 

, with consumers. If we were planning to plant the "sweat-boxes" in that colony. The supply and consumpt.on of cereals in this 

Office,S52 Sfarh-t St., N. E.cor. Front St.,S. F. a 8mall orchard we would prefer to take our We trust that raisin packers will be able to , city for the month of .lune, 1885, as reported 
tT Take the Elevator, No. It Front St.TjSk chance near gome moderate 8 i ze d town, away see the advantage of keeping packages of Cali- [ by A. .1. (,ove, grain inspector of the Call 

- _, M .„„ f t u„ „ PO ,t fmit rlistrints than to Dav a fornia raisins up to their full weight. It will Board of the S. F . Produce Exchange, is as fol- 

Addrk-;-! ALU literary and business correspondence and | from the great truit districts, man 10 pay a r si 

drafts for this paper In th e name o f the firm. great price fof , and becau8e it liea w ;thin some I* decidedly in favor of Cilifornia fruit to have 1 

Our Subscription Rates. [ fashionable area. Then by planting a variety | a square and honest package as well as a su- 

Our Subscription Kates are thru e dollars a year' o{ f ru ;t s and ministering to the local demand perior fruit. There has been for years great 
ShS^S^r^^7:nr r : fXn (|uit e a comfortable living can be made at a very complaint and dissatisfaction with the foreign 
X^&'&l^c&V&J^A^^Z , pleasant kind of woik. These remarks are ; fruit in this respect, and hardly afiy amount of 

.d Mrt ^n7r a te 9 - only intended for those who only have small protest could overcome the greed of the foreign ( ._ pt . on f/)r JnM — £ -— — " — 

ImJ* 3 Lk I Year, means, and are seeking to enter orcharding in a packers. By giving full weight with the Call Thia 8bows th&t there wag Qn hand Ju , y )gt 

V: Vo w *AZ small way. It seems likely that such will gain fornia fmit, we shall capture at once the re- on , y , upplyforabout4r , day8 . con8urnption of bar . 

rjr7p"inoh 2.00 5.00 1 4.00 45.00 pro fits far beyond the proportion which their taller and consumer. \\ e are going to have a , ey and ^ ^ a month , 8 gupp , y of corn> and 

Large advertisements at favorable rates. Special or read j _ . m „ nt . t n the investments of the -iv.it large raisin product, and can aff jrd to give good ., n , , , - , . . 

lug notices, legal advertisements, notices appearing in extra in ves ment oears r,o me investments ui me gieai a v ,' , . so about .50 days supply of bran — supposing that 

ordinary type, or in particular parts of the paper, at special i a ,.f e rs Those who desire to plant 1 iree or- measure to those who by their patronage assist 

ratna Koiir insertions are rated in a month. | «» u . * ... .. , , « 

chards are, of course, wise to seek land near to us to bod an enduring and prohtable demand, 
the main centers of the fruit trade. 

The consumption of fruit in many of our | Forestry, 
small towns is altogether less than it should be, I 

because retailers' prices are too high. How | \ 9 W as stated some time ago in the Rural, a 



Barle\ . 
tons. 

Stock on hand June 1 7,571 

Receipts for June 5,016 

Total 12,016 

(in hand July 1 (subtract) 7,4Sii 



Oats, 
tons. 

r,ioi 

8 4H4 

:!,47!l 



Corn, 
tons. 

521) 
1,150 

1.H79 
785 



Bran, 
tons. 
4 65:: 
1,200 

BjMI 
4,151 



I Week 

Per Line (agate) .... % .25 
Half inch (1 squa re). 1 .50 



rates. Four insertions are rated in a month. 

Our latent forms go to press Wednesday evening. 
Entered at the S. F. Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



SCIENTIFIC ritESS PATENT AOENCY. 
DEWEY & CO., Patent Solicitors. 

A.T. DKWKV W. B. KWER. G. B. STRONG. 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

Saturday, July 1 1, 1885. 
TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

KDITORIALS.— The Desert and Its Beasts of Burden, 
21. The Week; Home .Markets for Fruit; California 
lUisins; Forestry; Supply and Consumption of Feed 
Rais'ns; Eastern Fruit Crops, 28. The Centennial 
I'herrv; Crvntal Springs Health Resort, 29. 

ILLUSTRATIONS —A Kcbt in the Desert-Froin a 
Picture by G, li. Iluber, 21. The Centennial Cherry; 
Rural llealtn Resort (Crv.tal Springs), St. Helena, Cal., 
29 

THE APIARY — The Honey F.xtractor and It* I'se; 

Mr. Mi**' Phenomenon, 22. 
THE DAIRY.— The Guernsey Cattle; A Butter Test; 

Making Whey Butter; Test for Oleomargarine; Dairy 

statistics, 22. 
THE FIELD.— Restoration of Fertility 22 
SHEEP AND WOOL.— Our Sheep "industry : Wash 

nig Sheep a Hid Practice; Wool in Australia. 23. 
THE LUMBERMAN 

Mount iins; Lumber Interests 

and Lumbering ill Shasta: Forest Fires, 23. 
POULTRY KARD. — Don't; Advice Wanted, 28. 
PATRONS OF HUSH AW DRY. — The Sacramento 

Grangaffl and Fruit Growers; Watsonvide Orange; 

Practical Patriotbvi by Stockton Orange; The Grange 

and the Kail'*, 24. 
AGRICULTURAL NOTES -From the Various 

counties of California, 24-25 
TUB HOME CIRCLE.-PuH Your Own Wee's; 

Selfishness Cnveiled; Cordelia's Story, 2G. 
YOUNG FOLKS' COLLI MN. -The Puzzle Box: 

'l lir i •aptain'* Sti>rv . 27 
GOOD HEALTH. -Pure Wa'e; Food for the Nervous 

Person; Epithelioma; Oood Neus for Hungry Folks, 

27. 

DOMESTIC ECONOMY.- EngHsb Apple Tart; 
Koast Veal; Fried Scallop*; Oreen*; Ma aroni Pudding; 
Green Pea Soup; Minced Veal; Stewed Lamb. 27. 



Acme Pulverizing Harrow — Nash & Bro., Millington 
Litton Spring* < o!lege— Sjnoma Co., Cal. 
Land Clauje V, Burke, Yolo, Cal. 
Nurseries— J. Lusk & Sou, Oakland, Cal. 
Soap Pinchbeck Ac olootz, S. F. 
St. Matthc* s EUI San Mateo, Cal. 
Squirrel Exterminator Wakelee & Co 

€S"See Advertising Columtis. 



receipts of all these materials should stop. It 
follows then that growers have much to do in 
regulating prices by keeping the visible sup- 
plies in the city small. 

Much is said of great supplies of barley being 
imminent from Oregon, with an idea of lower- 
much fruit can you expect to have eaten when hill was passed by the last Legislature organi/.- ing prices here. How little there is in that 
prices are like those described by the Mendo- j ng a Forestry Commission, and appropriating claim may be seen from the fact that the whole 
0100 Beacon, as follows: money for its use. The commission appointed receipts of barley in Portland from August I, 

In this market strawberries readily bring 25 by Governor Stoneman, in accordance with the 1884, to July 1, 1885, a period of 1 1 months 
cents a quart, and are scarce at . that. Rasp- uions of the bl „ are Hon j y Coleman, were 6:1,910 centals, of which not more than 
berries are very seldom seen. 1 hey are culti- • ' 

vated to a very limited extent, but they are all Chas. M. Chase, and A. Kellogg, the well- half has come to this port. Even if the whole 
consumed on or near the spot where they are known botanist and curator of botany of the amount should come here it would not last Sin 
produced. Blackberries are more common, for Academy of Sciences. The commission has re- Francisco more than 1. 5 days. 

had ffr r °the picking°" They brinj Tgood^und ceived a ,ot of forest tree 8ueds from thel)e - Another important fact about supplies of 

price, however, probably never less than 15 partment of Agriculture, and Dr. Kellogg is at barley from the north is that the product ot 

cents a quart. Karly peaches, apricots, plums, present studying the conditions for planting the brewing barley from Eistern Oregon and Wash- 

etc., are brought in, but in small quantities, 8ee(lg the kind o{ goil required, the climate, iogton Territory goes east over the Northern 

not that they are scarce where they grow, , ., . .. . . ... . _ .„ .... , , „ . , 

nor that we up here have not a good appetite for uaes of the wood or timber, and will in time Pacific to Milwaukee and Chicago, and other 
them, but the prices asked amount to almost pro- embody his information in the form of a circu- northwest cities, because it can be taken there 
hibition. We cannot indulge freely in fruit at l ar> which will be sent with the packages. The for little, if any, more than it can hi brought to 
10 cents a pound and unless some plan can be emission are also in correspondence with the San Francisco, while the price of brewing bar- 
devised by which we can be supplied at a good . . . A ..,.» . , „ , , r ,„ 

-Sending Logs Don Nevada deal less price we must content ourselves to i torestry Commissions of Australia and New ley there ranges from $1.00 to |2 per cental, 

■sts on Puget Sound; Timber u6e f ru it as we do other luxuries— sparingly. Zealand, and will shortly have for distribution Therefore the birley which comes herefrom 

Forest fires 9R. I ro^ ' * ,,...« 

There is no (|iie8tion about it, our rural towns the seeds of the jarrah tree a species ot that direction is broken and otherwise uutit for 
will take much more fruit if it is furnished to eucalyptus which is said to defy the attacks brewing, and sells for feeding purposes, 
them at a reasonable price, and that is where | of sea worms and teredo, and hence of great A demand for barley and other feed stuffs 
the enterprising small orchardist will often find possible value for wharf building along our | f or shipment to Pacific ports, Victoria, 
his opportunity for success. Let him seek a , coast. I Hawaiian Islands and other poiuts is increasing 

growing town, aw»y from the fruit districts, In this connection it will be proper to call | largely. The Hawaiian stock interests are in - 
explore the surrounding country and form an attention to the fact that the subject of forestry creasing and feed stuff's must be purchased 
idea of whether the trees already planted are is gaining ground in the public mind all over here, 
sii ttieient for the future demands of the town. I the country. We have received a prospectus 
Probably not one town in ten outside of the of a general meeting of the American Forestry- 
fruit districts has enough trees in its vicinity Congress, which will be held in P>oston during 
to supply its own needs. Make then a good se the first part of September. The prospectus 

lection of soil and location. Plant a consider- \ notes some of the results which have already pro( j U ce a full crop this year, 
able variety of fruit to allow for failures and in followed the organization of the congress, 
nearly every case the small orchardist need not The meeting in Cincinnati called forth the 
care what freight rates on fruit are or whether Ohio State Forestry Association, through whose 
the Kast takes three or three huudred carloads efforts a Forestry Commission has just been se- 
perday. If the local market does not take all cured. The Montreal meeting was followed, not 



Business Announcements. 



Eastern Fruit Crops. 



F. 



It seems to be decided that the peach regions 
of Maryland, Delaware and New Jersey are to 
(ieorgia and the 
other (lulf States are also highly favored. 
Outside of the great peach regions of the 
Atlantic seaboard there has been a final 
snutling out of the lingering hope that the 
North could produce peaches. The report tele- 



The Week. 

Active work in grain field and orchard con- 
tinues. We hear but little of the outpuc of 
grain as yet, in fact we expect people are gen- 
erally too busy to look about them much. In 
the city there is plenty of talk about the yield 
being much batter than was expected, but that 
is common anything which may teud to lower 
|irices is the talk of the season among the buy- 
Lirge quantities of fruit are being dis- 



Washington, says that from the Upper Ohio val- 
ley and the Lake States there comes but one rc- 



the fruit green it will take it dried and canned only by the forming of a local association, but grapne( i f rom t he Department of Agriculture at 
at home in small quantities at least. This little by sound fire legislation for the Dominion rec- 
fruit industry should commend itself to our ommended by the Congress. The St. Paul 

readers all over the State, where the great fruit meeting was at least indirectly responsible for port It tellg of tree8 a ji dead) wnole orc hard», 
enterprises have not taken root. the inauguration of a Manitoba Forestry Asso- L ven ; n tne most sheltered situations, having 

j ciation. To the efforts of officers of the Con- 8uccumbe d to the late frosts. In New Kng- 

California Raisins. gress is due the formation of the New York I land there was much winter killing and the 

| state Forestry Association. It has also ex- j few surv i v ing trees that bloomed were stripped 

The coming raisin crop promises to be large erted indirect influence on other movements j of their blossoms by the late frosts of spring, 
and of good quality if the weather should be like that in Colorado, resulting in the appoint- New y ork an( j Pennsylvania showed a like ex- 
favorable. It promises also to be cured and ment of a Forest Commissioner; on the Adi- per i enc e, while in the West and Northwest the 
packed, as a rule, better than heretofore.be- rondack legislation for the State of New York: a i, n08 t universal expression is "No blossoms" 



posed of, although the prices are very low. i , ■ , , , 

The canuers, stimulated by cheap fruit and cause our 8 rowers are constautly learning more the establishment of Arbor days m fifteen and ,. Treeg (lead 
low-priced sugar, are encompassing quite a ibout these branches ot their business and do not States. The means of the association being Now that we a 



are putting down cherries suc- 
F.astern mirkcts, it becomes in- 

them on style, as they certainly cannot do on produced are largely due to individual efforts toMtil| j i earn that the Kastern cherry- 



pack in spite of their dreary talk a month or propose to allow the foreign producers to beat exceedingly limited, whatever effects have been ceasfnUv on the Fastern mirkets it becomes in 

two ago. They claim that they will have to ' -• ■ • ■• ... . . ...... . j, 5 1 . » . I " 



sell low, but that is what they should do when . 

the grower has to take a low figure. Cheapen- the actual <l>>"l>ty of the fruit. \\ e are grati of members. growers are endeavoring to get a hardier cherry 

ing our canned fruit will bring it within the Bed to see the enterprise and spirit which per- For the coming meeting in Hoston it has been wnich tney nope to be a iji e ^ grow ^ t tne 

comers' do" not InlnZ^nThPrn^^V^ V3deS * he rai " in intereSt " ^ leadiDg th ° UgU ^ *° ""^ ^ ^ ° f ^P"™ 8D<1 recent meeting of the Nurserymen's Association 

u":;- =t:;;s,zs;: in «p° ints - Wesha11 w« 6^0^,^^^^^^ lowing |. n 

Chicago, it was ascertained that the clean 

should be extended by this year's work. Fruit thi " y uar to finUh "I 1 the cro P and to protect it list of topics is suggested: Importance of for- | gweep of th(j cherry tree8 by tne past severe 

is going Fast as freely as the roads will take it, against any adverse weather. A number of este; duties of the States; forest li res; forestal winters has led to constant tiueries in regard to 

know^Ttonwh^ and our education • P ractical forestr y- Under the8e the cherries on trial from the east plain of 

Midsummer quiet brings the Kprai. back to makers of artitic > a l d »ers are appreciating the general heads nearly all important matters may Kurope This wi n reBU i t in the importation of 

fact that curing raisins doe B not mean cooking be introduced. The Congress also invites com- maQy thousands of small trees next winter, of 

them - munications on subjects which may suggest the varietie8 grown on the plains east of the 

The K astern market is apparently in very themselves to writers, or of subjects of their c arpa thians in Kurope 

good shape. As shown by the many para- special study. Notice of the subject chosen 1 

graphs we have published from time to time, should be given to the secretary ( P>. E. Fernow, 

Ivistern fruit dealers are learning a truer appre- 13 Hurling Slip, New York), as soon as possi- 

ciation of California raisins and are ready to ble. Invitations will be sent to eminent stu- 



to its old size of lb' pages. It is a long time 
since we have been able to close a week with- 
out a supplementary sheet. Trade affairs are 
quite dull in nearly all lines, but there is no 
icasou to anticipate a long continuance of it. 
Merchants are bringing in large stocks of 
goods for fall trade and are anticipating a good 
business. We hope this will be realized as it 
has been their extraordinary favors to the 
RU&AL which have enabled us to present to our 
readers so many extra pages both of reading 
and advertising matter. 



Bf.rkshirk Sale. - The list of sales of thor- 
oughbred Kerkshires sent out by Phil. M. 
Springer, Secretary ot the Berkshire Associ- 

handle them now, though a year or two ago dents of the subjects involved to present their I ation includes, the sale of Lola Montez 12,6.'13, 
they seemed quite wedded to the distribution views. A special effort will be made to present and Bessie 13,682, by J. S. Conner, of Santa 
of the Malaga crop. As our raisins will ' the papers to be read at Boston, and those ' Clara, to J. P. Pierce of the same piece. 



JoT.t 11, 1885] 



f ACIFI6 RURAL* fRESS. 



20 



The Centennial Gherry. 

i iliforoia has reason to be proud of the 
steadily increasing list of seedling fruits of 
great merit originating in the State. Among 
•others, the "Muir" peach and the "Marshall's 
Seedling," or R«d BeDHower apple, introduced 
last season, have already attained a justly cele- 
brated reputation, and now comes the "Cen- 
tennial" cherry, which promises to eclipse them 
all. The cut, drawn from nature, gives a gen- 
eral idea of the shape and size of the fruit. 

The "Centennial" cherry is a seedling of 
Napoleon Bigarreau, originating in the orchard 
of Mr. Henry Chapman, in Napa valley. It 
bore fruit first in 1876, hence its name. The 
tree has many peculiar and distinctive charac- 
teristics. It is a heavy grower, with coarse, 
large wood; the leaves are more rounded than 
those of the Napoleon, and less serrate; they 
have a glossy, shining appearance, which is 
very marked comparing them with the leaves of 
other varieties- on the current season's growth 
they are large, but very much smaller on 
the older wood, and also much curled, showing 
the under surface. The wood is exceedingly 
short jointed, fruit spurs being fully developed 
on ma/iy trees in nursery the first season, the 
trees blossoming profusely at one year from the 
bud. The general habit of the tree is low and 
spreading, and for the nine years it has fruited, 
it has proved itself an early, abundant and 
regular bearer. The fruit is large to very large, 
oblate in form; short pedicles; color pale yel- 
low ground, beautifully splashed and marbled 
with crimson; Hesh very sweet, very firm; pit 
small; ripens about with the Napoleon Bigar- 
reau. 

In a word, the remarkable firmness and ex" 
cessive sweetness, combined with the strikingly 
handsome appearance, of the "Centennial" 
cherry, will command for it a world wide repu- 
tation, adding a new luster to the already uni- 
versally acknowledged supremacy of California 
as a fruit country. Coates fc Tool, of Napa, 
who have propagated the Centennial exten- 
sively in their nurseries and offer it for sale for 
the first time this season, have sent samples of 
the fruit by mail throughout the East and 
< 'anada, and we make following extracts from 
letters received, to show how this new Califor- 
nia variety is regarded by some 
of the leaders of American po- 
mology: Hon. Marshall P. 
Wilder, president American 
Pomological Society, says, "It 
is an improvement on its pa- 
rent, the Napoleon Bigarreau." 
Wm. l'ariy, of New Jersey, 
after receiving the samples, 
kept them for exhibit at a fair, 
after which he says they were 
still in good condition. D. W. 
Beadle, .St. Catherine, Ont. , 
Canada: "Your sample of the 
'Centennial' cherry came to 
hand through the mail in ex- 
cellent condition. 1 1 is a very 
firm fruit, sweet, and of excel- 
lent quality." Hon. T. T. 
Lyon, president Michigan 
State Horticultural Society, 
says the fruit arrived in fine 
condition, fully justifying the 
statements in the circular 
which accompanied it. The 
Newark (N. .1.) Daily Advi r- 
titer says: "Comptroller P. T. 
Ouinn" (a well-known horti- 
culturist) "this morning re- 
ceived a small tin box 
from Napa City, California, containing what 
are called 'Centennial' cherries. The box 
was mailed June 1st, and when opened the 
cherries were found to be as solid and 
healthy as when picked from the tree." 
P. J. Berckmans, vice-president American 
Pomological Society, Augusta, Ga., says: "The 
fherries were received in excellent condition, 
thus proving their shipping qualities. As to 
quality, it can safely be classed as best." Ell- 
wanger & Barry, Rochester, N. Y., write: "The 
cherries came to hand in perfect condition, and 
are an excellent fruit, firmer and sweeter than 
Napoleon." Dr. E. L. Sturtevant, Director 
New York Agricultural Experiment Station, 
pronounces the Centennial "exceedingly sweet 
and delicious, and entirely firm, after its jour- 
ney across the continent." K. Y. Teas, of Indi- 
ana, writes: "The cherries were mailed to me 



on the 30th May, and have, therefore, been 11 
days in transit. Those we have eaten seem to 
us wonderfully firm, and also very good. The 
shipping qualities of the 'Centennial' are cer- 
tainly very remarkable." 

It should be remembered that these samples 
were packed in tin boxes, and were in a hot 
mail bag from 7 to 14 days, having also l>3en 
picked several days before forwarded. We hope 
it will not be many years before many carloads 
of this Centennial cherry will find their way to 
the Eastern markets. Hixson, .Tusti & Co., of 



well loaded trees of their age as we saw on Mr. 
O'Neil's place. The union of scion and stock 
was apparently as perfect as could be desired, 
and everything we could see demonstrated the 
desirability of the Mirabolan stocks. 

Mr. O'Neil is evidently an enthusiast on the 
value of the Mirabolan and maintains its pecu- 
liar value in more respects than we can enu 
merate. He promises to present his views on 
the subject in a letter to the Rural at some con- 
venient time, and then our fruit-growing read- 
ers can have the matter for general discussion. 




A NEW CALIFORNIA CHERRY THE "CENTENNIAL.' 



Chicago, who also received an experimental 
sample, write that "it can be shipped to Chi- 
cago as easily as to San Francisco." That is 
the kind of fruit we will probably have to 




RviUS,\_ HtKUtt RURtlvA (CHNSMvV. 



grow in this State to realize our full expecta- 
tions from ov\r orchard industry. 



Mirabolan Nursery. 

We accepted the invitation of James O'Neil, 
of the Mirabolan Nursery, at Haywards, on 
Friday of last week, to examine the bearing 
qualities of different trees which he had grown 
on Mirabolan roots. He said that it had been 
reported that the apricot and peach would not 
fruit satisfactorily on the Mirabolan stock, and 
he desired to make ocular demonstration of the 
falsity of the report. He showed us two and 
i three-year-old trees, apricot, peach, prune and 
plum (both the old and the Japanese varieties), 
which were certainly models of vigorous growth 
and bearing a heavy crop of large fruit. We 
do not remember ever seeing such large and 



Crystal Springs Health Retreat 

Among the many delightful places for rest, 
recreation and restoration of mind and frame 
in California, is the "Crystal Springs Rural 
Health Retreat," shown in the engraving on 
this page. The retreat is situated on the slope 
of Howell mountain, 1,2C0 feet above tide 
level, 500 feet above and over looking Napa 
Valley, and two and a half miles from St. He- 
lena, in Napa county. Among the natural ad- 
vantages are stated: "pure water, dry atmo- 
sphere, balmy sunshine, even temperature, mild 
breezes, and the absence of high winds. Across 
the valley lies the Sonoma mountain range, 
breaking the sea breeze and shielding the Retreat 
from the chilling atmosphere of the coast, and 
presenting a safeguard against catarrh and lung 
diseases. The grandeur of its mountain ranges, 
with shrubby canyons lying in beauty at their 
feet, the famous Mt. St. Helena rearing its 
lofty head to the clouds, the grassy plain lying 
beneath, rtllecting the sunbeams like a grand 
mirror before the Retreat, all perfumed with 
a variety of wildtlowers, lend an enchantment 
to the scene. There are no stagnant pools or 
marshes within range; rainfall is plenteous, 
rendering irrigation unnecessary, and malaria 
is a stranger at the Retreat, and in all this 
beautiful valley. In fact, the purity of the air 
on this hillside and in the upper valley, is a 
specific for malaria, and all diseases affecting 
the head, throat and lungs; producing a healthy 
circulation through the mucous passages gen- 
erally." 

The Rural Health Retreat is twofold in its 
character. In the first place it undertakes to do 
direct work in the cure of diseases by hygienic 
and rational practice, by a thoroughly compe- 
tent physician resident in the Retreat. While 
a radical table is furnished for invalids and 
proper diet prescribed for each individual case, 
no one is confined to a starvation diet, and bet- 
ter and more ample variety is furnished at 
meals than is usually found upon invalid tables 
elsewhere. The managers have secured the ser- 
vices of a thoroughly competent physician from 
New York, of nine years' experience in practice. 
Being a graduate from a three years' course of 
medicine and surgery in one of the New York 
medical colleges, it is his intention to keep 
abreast of the age in his pro- 
fession. He is assisted by 
two lady attendants having 
a two years' course at one of 
the largest hygienic and surgi- 
cal sanitariums in the world, 
with five years' subsequent 
practice. 

The Retreat is also a sum- 
mer resort to all who desire 
to spend a few weeks or 
months in recreation, and re- 
ceive the benefit from rest 
and breathing this mountain 
air, whose healthfulness and 
purity is unsurpassed. For 
such, a liberal table is espec- 
ially provided. While the 
chief object of this institution 
is to afford a sanitarium for 
those in need of hygienic and 
surgical treatment, ample 
means are afforded for recre- 
ation, and entertainment is 
provided for all boarders and 
pleasure-seekers who love de- 
cency and good order. Wind- 
ing and picturesque roads, 
walls of blasted rock terracing 
the sidehills about the main 
based alone on his California experience, but j buildiug, cottages and drive ways, a fine cam- 



Mr. O'Neil is a horticulturist of long expe- 
rience, having won honors in Pennsylvania 
many years ago, before coming to this State. 
His adherence to the Mirabolan root is not 



also upon what he knew of it in the neighbor 
hood of Philadelphia, and from his investi- 
gation into practices on the continent of 
Europe. He believes the time will come when 
planters will insist on having trees worked on 
the Mirabolan and not on other stocks. 

After thoroughly inspecting Mr. O'Neil's 
trees he took us a pleasure ride to a fine place 
he is planting out and improving on the hill 
side back of the town, and then (trove through 
a number of orchards in the vicinity, all of 
which we greatly enjoyed. 

A PlOKIO, numbering thirty, mostly from 
Crystal Springs, enjoyed .July '2d in a well- 
suited grove near Calistoga, just west of the St. 
Helena road. The families of Pratt, Hicks, 
and Dewey; Mr. Harman, of Healdsburg; Dr. 
Oibbs and Matron Ings and others of the 
Rural Health Retreat, were among the num- 
ber that delighted in the ride across the valley. 



pus, spacious woods, shady groves, arbored 
seats, swings, swinging rings, swinging chairs, 
will be furnished; dumb-bill and Indian club 
exercises given to such as may desire them. 
Calisthenic exercises will also be led by a com- 
petent leader. 

We feel an especial interest in the liural 
Health Retreat, because one of the proprietors 
of the Puicss, Mr. A. T. Dewey, with his 
family, has recently greatly enjoyed a recrea- 
tion season there. They assure us that they are 
exceedingly well pleased with the Retreat for 
its natural and added beauties and comforts.and 
for the pure moral tone, the kindliness and cor- 
diality which prevail in the management. The 
accessibility of the Retreat also should contri- 
bute to its desirability both to the invalid and 
the pleasure-seeker. 



30 



fACIFie RURAlo p>RESS. 



[Jdly 11, 1885 



breeders' bpctory, 



hi\ lines or leas In this Directory at 50c. a line per month 



POULTRY. 



T D MORRIS, Sonoma, Cal. Tuolouse and Embden 
'Geese, Bronze and W. Holland Turkeys, and all leading 

varieties of Thoroughbred Poultry. 
MRS D. C VESTAL. San Jose. Brown Leghorns, 
Langshans ami Plymouth Kocks. Eggs and Fowls 



CALIFORNIA POULTRY FARM. Stockton, Cal. 
Importers and breeders of Thoroughbred Poultry. Eggs 
and chic ks for sale. Cutting S Kobinson, P. O. Box 7. 
R G HEAD, Napa, Cal , breeder of high class Land 
and Water Fowls and Berkshire Hgs, Brahma*. Cochins, 
Langshans, Plymouth Kocks, Leghorns, licese, Ducks, 
Turkeys. Send 2-cent stamp lo r Circular. 



A PROVO KLUIT, Fruitvale avenue, Alameda Co., 
Cal., P. O. Box -J19, Oakland, breeder and ini|»rter of 
lin e Thoroughbred Poult ry. Circular free. 

O. J. ALB BE, Santa Clara, Cal., breeder of Lang- 
shans, Partridge Cochins, Pedigreed Scotch Collies, 
White Crested Black Polish, Wjandottes, Brown Leg- 
horns, anil Black B. K. Game Itantams. 



D H. EVERETT, 161U Larkin it., San Francisco, 
breeder of Langshans exclusively. Eggs and fowls. 



MRS J. H. SMYTH, 6ii Montgomery St., San Fran- 
cisco. Thoroughbred Langshans; F.gg s W perl3._ 

C H. NEAL, Lodi, San Joaquin Co., importer and 
breeder of Thoroughbred Poultry for 20 years. Has 
all the leading varieties and birds of all classes for sale, 
as well as Kggs for hitching. 

W C DAMON, Napa, White and Brown Leghorns, 
li Spanish, P. Kocks, Light Brabmas, Langshans, i'e- 
kin Ducks; eggs 10 cts.; fowls *2.00 each. Circulars 
free. 



MRS. L. J. W ATKINS, San Jose, Cal. Pure bred 
Fancy Poultry. White and Brown Leghorns, Plymouth 
Rooks, Langshans, Houdans, Light Brahtnus, and 
Black Spanish. Eggs and Fowls. 



AXFOKD'S 1MFKOVKD INCUBATOR. For 
further information addres s 1. P. Clarke, May- field, Cal. 

MRS. M. E. NEWHALL, San Jose. White and 
Brown Leghorns, Langshans, Plymouth Rocks, Light 
Brahni as, Pekin Ducks and Bronze Turkeys. 

SMITH'S POULTRY YARDS, Blanding avenue, 
Alameda, Cal. All the leading varieties of Thorough- 
bred Fowls, and Eggs for hatching. Also the Alameda 
Brooder and agent for the Relief Incubators. Address, 
Chas. W. Smith, P. O. Box 57, Oakland, Cal. 

GEO. B. BAYLEY, 1317 Castro St., Oakland, Im- 
porter and Breeder of all the best known and most 
profitable Laud and Water Fowls. Publisher of the 
Pacific Coast Poulterers' Hand Book and Guide. Price 
40 cents. Send i cent stamp for Illustrated Circular. 

D D BRIGGS, Los Gatos, Cal. , importer and breeder 
of Langshans, W. F. Bl. Spanish, Bl. Hamburgs, Ply- 
mouth Kocks, Black Japan Bantams, Golden Spangled 
Poland's, Pckin Ducks. Circulars free. 



HORSES AND CATTLE. 



J. R. ROSE, Lakeville, Sonoma Co., Cal. Breeder 
of Thoroughbred Dev ons, Roadsters and Draft Horses. 

COTATE RANCH BREEDING FARM, Page's 
Station, S. F. & N. P. R. R. P. O., Penn's Grove, 
Sonoma Co., Cal. Wilfred Page, Manager Breeders 
of Short Horn Cattle, English Draft Horses, Spanish Me- 
rino Sheep and Berkshire Swine. 



S. SCOTT. Clovcrdale, Cal. , Importer and Breeder of 
high-breed Short Horn Cattle of the best milking quali- 
ties. Imported Duke of Auckland (3S5) at head of herd. 
Jacks and Siianish Merino Sheep. All kinds of stock 
for sale. 

ROBERT BECK, San Francisco, Breeder of Regis- 
tered Thoroughbre d Jerseys. 

MRS. M. E. BRADLEY, San Jose, Cal. Breedei 
of recorded thoroughbred Short Horn Cattle and Berk- 
shire Hogs. A choice lot of young stock for sale. 

PETER SAXE & SON, Lick House, San Francisco, 
Cal. Importers and Breeders, for past J4 years, ot 
every variety of Cattle, Horses, Sheep ana Hogs. 

J. A. BREWER, Centerville, Alameda Co., Cal. 
Short Horns and Grades. Correspondence solicited. 



WILLIAM NILES. Los Angeles, Cal. Thorough- 
bred Poultry. Cattle and Hogs. Write for oiroular. 

SEE HENRY PIERCE'S Jersey advertisement. 



SWINE. 



WILLIAM NILES, Los Angeles, Cal. Thoroughbred 
Poland-China and Berkshire Pigs. Circulars free. 

JOHN RIDER, Sacramento, Cal. Breeder of Thor- 
oughbred Berkshire Swine. My stock of Hogs are all 
reoorded in the American Berkshire Record. 

F. W. SCOFIELD, Santa Cruz, Cal., breeder of 
thoroughbred Duroc Jersey Swine. Pigs for sale. 

TYLER BEACH, San Jose, Cal. Breeder of Thor- 

omrhhred Berkshire**. 



SHEEP AND GOATS. 



L. U. SHIPPEE, Stockton, Cal. Importer and breeder 
of Spanish Merino Sheep, Durham Cattle, Red Duroc 
and Berkshire Swine Hurh eroded Rams for aal« 



JULIUS WEYAND, Breeder of pure-blooded An- 
gora Goats, Little Stony, Colusa Co., Cal. 



BEES. 



WM. MUTH-RASMUSSEN, Independence, Inyo 
County, Cal. , dealer in Honey, Comb Foundation, and 
Italian Queens in season. Bee-hive and frame ma- 
terial sawed to order. 

J. D. ENAS, Sunnyside, Napa, Cal., breeds Pure 
Italian (Queens. No foul brood. Comb Foundation, 
Extractors, etc. "Cook's Manual of the Apiary." 



COOK FEED v?," STOCK 



With the TRHIM V II 
STKAM (iKN KK.VIOK 
It will save J to I of your 
Feed, and your stock will 
thrive better and fatten 
quicker. Send for Illustrated 
Circular. Address Truman, 
Ishaiu & Co., 509 Market 
Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




Houses a\nd Guttle. 

FINE IMPORTED 

Pore Bred & High Grade Animals 

FOR SALE 



PETALUMA STOCK BREEDERS' ASSOCIATION. 

location: 
PETALUMA, SONOMA CO., CAL., 

board of directors: 
J. R ROSE, THEO. SKILLMAN, E. DENMAN, 
ROBERT CRANE, J. H. WHITE. 

Everything Guaranteed as Represented. 
Fine Breeding Animals a Specialty. 

HORSES: Draft, Carriage and Roadsters. 
CATTLE: Holstein, Devon, Jersey, Ayrshire and Short 
Horns. 

SHEEP: Merinos, Shropshires, Southdowns and others. 
SWINE: Berkshire, Duroc and Poland-China. 
POULTRY: All approved varieties. 

Call on or address J. II. MoN ABB, Sec'y, 

McCune's Block, Pctaluma. 



HOLSTEIN and JERSEY CATTLE. 



The undersigned has choice Registered animals of 
this brce of cattle for sale at reasonable prices. 




YERBA BUENA JERSEYS. 

Registered in the A. J. C. C..N.Y 



Also BERKSHIRE and POLAND-CHINA 

POULTRY IN ALL VARIETIES. 

Address: WILLIAM NILES. 

Los Angolea, Cal. 

ONTARE RANCHO. 

Imported French Coach Horses, 

CLYDESDALE HORSES, 

Trotting Bred Roadsters, 

AND 

IMPORTED 

HOLSTEIN CATTLE 

F. T. UNDERBILL, Proprietor. 

Address C. F. SWAN, 

Santa Barbara. Cal. 




Records of Foundation Stock. 

MARY ANNE OF ST. LAMBERT, 36 11.8. 12} ozs.,1 week, 

A. J. V. 0L test: B6> lbs. 14} ozs. in 11 months. 
IDA OF ST. LAMBF.RT. 30 It*. 2* ozs., 1 week, A. J. C. C. 
JERSEY BELLE OF SCITl'ATE, i r i lbs. 4} ozs., 1 week. 
MON PLASIR. 18? lbs., 1 week. 
El'ROTAS, 778 lbs. in 11 months. 

Descendants of above Cows for Sale. 
HENRY PIERCE, San Francisco, Cal. 



BADEN FARM HERD. 
Of Short Horn Cattle and Dairy Cows. 

Catalogues and Prices on application to 

ROBERT ASHBURNER, 
Rarlen Station. ... San Mateo Co 

WANTED. 

A 2-Year-Old 

THOROUGHBRED DURHAM BULL 

State price to F., "Rural Press" Office. 



SQUIRREL and GOPHER 
EXTERMINATOR! 




This .Exterminator dispenses with all doI- 
sonous and dangerous preparations. 

THE MATERIAL USED COSTS NOTHING. 

For particulars, send (or Illustrated Circular with 
Testimonials. Address: 

JOHN TAYLOR, or F. E. BROWNE 

44 So. Spilng Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

SURE JJEATH! 

(I RIIUAPU H G. N. MILCCS California Universal 
DUnnun, Insect Exterminator. Sure death 
to all Insects and harmless to human life. A California 
production. Millions of people are enjoying its great 
usef-'lness. Directions with each package. Druggists 
ami Grocers sc 1 it at 'Jo cents, bO cents, 76 cents, $1.25 a 
can, and fl-pound cans at $4. 60 per can. Never buy 
Bl'HACH in bulk, but in original cans, and see that they 
are sealed anil covered bv our tradt-mark, as mccess will 
not crown your efforts unless you use genuine HUIIACH 

Buhach Producing and M'f'g Co., 

Manufacturers, 
154 Levee Street, Stockton, Cal. 

and 49 Cedar Street, New Y'ork , N. Y. 



IMPORTANT! 

That the public ahouM know that for the past Fourteen Tears our Sole Himincss has been, and now is 
importing (Over lOO Carloads) am) breeding improved Live Stock— Horses, Jacks, Short HoniH, Ayrshires 
and Jerst'j s (or Alderneys) and their grades; also, all the varieties of breeding Sheep and Hogs. We can sup- 
ply an v and all good animals that may be wanted, and at very reasonable prices and on convenient 
terras. Write or call on us. PETER SAXE and HOMER P. SAXE. 

San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 22, 1&*4. PETEK SAXE & SON, Lick House, S. F. 



(WINE. 



500 HEAD ON HANI). 



The Largest and Choicest Herd in this Country. 



Over thirty yearly records 
made in this herd average 
14, '21*2 lbs. 5 ounces; average 
age of cows 41 years. ^^flsW 

In 1881 our entire herd of 
mature cows averaged 14,184 
lbs. 15 ounces. 

In 18N2 our entire herd of 
eight three-year-olds aver- 
aged 1 -2,38)1 lbs. a ounces. 

April I, 1884, ten cows in 
this herd bad made rerurds 
from 14,000 to 18,000 each, 
averaging 15,608 lbs. 3-10 
ounces. 

(BUTTER KEC'OKDS CON 

ounces per week. The entire original 
17 lbs. 8 1-6 ounces per week. 

Kvery animal selected by 
sWWhen writing always mention 



For the year ending June, 
1884, five mature cows aver- 
aged 15,621 lbs. 1 2-5 ounces. 

Seven heifers of the Ne- 
therland Family, Ave of them 
2 years old and two 3 years 
old, averaged 11,558 lbs. 
1 2-5 ounces. 

BUTTER - RicORDS : 

Nine cows averaged 17 lbs. 
5ft ounces per week. 

Eight heifers, 3 years old, 
averaged 13 lbs. 4} ounces 
*fm.c* t <~£f~~ per week. 

TINUED.) Eleven heifers, two years old and younger, averaged 10 lbs. 3 
imported Netherland Family of six cows (two being but 3 years old) averaged 

a member of the firm in person, 
the Pacific Kukal Pkkhs. 




SMITHS, POWELL & LAMB, Lakeside Stock Farm, Syracuse, N. Y. 




DUROC SWINE. 

Fine Pigs of the Above Breed 

FOR SALE. 

f^Kight of my Pigs are now on record as foundation 
stock in the KECOKD BOOK of the American Du- 
roc Jersey Swine Breeders' Association, of 
which 1 am a member. 

F. P. BEVERLY, 
Mountain View, Santa Clara Co., CaL 



JONESA POLAND CHINA FARM. 




ELLAS GALLUP, Hanford Tulare, Co., Cal. 

Breeder of pure-bred Poland China Pigs of the Black 
Beauty, Black Bess, Bismarck, and other noted tamilles. 
imported boars King of Bonny View and Gold Dust at head 
of the herd. Stock recorded in A. P. O. K Pigs sold at 
reasonable rates. Correspondence solicited. Address as above. 



BERKSHIRES A SPECIALTY. 




My Berkshires are Thoroughbred, and selected with 
great care from the best herds ol imported stock in the 
United States and Canada, and for individual merit, can- 
not be excelled. My breeding stock are recorded in the 
"American Berkshire Record," where none but pure-bred 
Hogs are admitted. Pigs sold at reasonable rates. Cor- 
respondence solicited. JOHN RIDER, Eighteenth 
and A Streets, Sacramento City, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR. 

1885. 

At Sacramento, September 7th to 19th, 
Two Weeks. 

The attention of the farming community of this State Is 
particularly called to the lib ral awards offered for 

County Exhibits. 

The eucouragement the Board met with fu their first 
effort to establish a dapaitment of this character, has in- 
duced them to lucre >se the amount of premiums this year. 
The exhibits ms.de in thi« department at the last State Fair, 
were forwarded" to New Orleans, and formed a sreater part 
of California's exhibit at the World's Fair of 1884-5, where 
they created an interest, and at the same time presented the 
practical results of farming in California. The object of the 
Board In offering these Inducements, is to bring directly to 
the noti e of the world the superior >ulvantages attained by 
California in farm products The tide of Immigration has 
turned this way. Those seeking homes among us are anx- 
ious to obtain much i formation as possible as to the 
yield of various products in diff-rent localities, etc. No 
better method of slrowing the different resources of each 
county could lie devised T ) this end the Board has offered 
iiii- most ttxte naive, ri i hi i. and Vnrled 
Exhibit oT Farm ■•roducl* (axe liaise "I livestock) 
CXblUM mm •> County Production, the sum 
ol Hl.ooo. divided utt follows: 

For the Best Display $500 00 

The remaining one t' ousand dollars will be distributed 
among the other couut'es in equitable proportion, consider- 
ing the merits of each coun y exhibit. 

Com etition to be between counties only. That Is to say, 
that the estirk exhibit made by one county must com- 
pete aoai.nst the entire exhibit of anotler county. The 
premium awarded to each county exhibit will he paid to the 
committee in charge of said exhibit. 

The State Board of Agriculture earnestly desires the 
hearty co-operation of the various subordinate (.ranges 
throughout the State, In making this exhibition of Cali- 
fornia's products u success wlureby the varied products of 
different localitiet may lie fully shown. We would ask the 
appointment of a committee from the Grange In each 
county to call upon and urge the Patrons to make a display 
representing their respective counties. 

£&'8knd for Premium List. 

JfcSSE D. CARR, President. 

EDWIN F. SMITH, Secretary. 

OThe BUYERS' GUIDE la 
Issued March and Sept., 
each year, n n 216 pages, 
••xli Inches, with over 
3,500 Illustrations — a 
whole Picture Gallery. 
GIVES Wholesale Prices 
ilirirt tn consumers on all Roods for 
personal or family nse. Tells how to 
order, and gives exact cost of every- 
thing you use, eat, drink, wear, or 
have fun with. These l.MAl.l (lll.l 
BOOKS contain information gleaned 
from the markets of the world. We 
will mall a copy FREK to any ad- 
dress upon receipt of 10 cts. to defray 
expense of mailing. Let us hear from 
you. Respectfully, 

MONTGOMERY WARD & CO. 

oV 2£0 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111. 



Jolt 11, 1885] 



fACIFie fvMJRAb fRESS. 



31 



Si 



|EE[» 



EE 



RAMS FOR SALE. 

200 THOROUGHBRED 
And Graded 

SPANISH MERINO 

Rama for Sale. 

Bred from the first impor- 
■j tations of Spanish Merino 
* Sheep to California, in 1854. 
Thoroughbred and High-Grade Ewes for sale. Prices 
reasonable. Residence, one mile north of McConnell's 
Station, Western Pacific Division C. P. R. R. P. O. address 
MRS. E. McCONNELL WILSON. 

Elk Grove, Sacramento Co., Cal, 





Thorouglibred 

SPANISH MERINO SHEEP. 

We are of- 
fering this 
season 400 
head of 
year ling 
and two 
year old 
rams and 
ewes in 
lots to 
suit, bred 
from the 
leading 
registered 
flocks of 
Vermont 

Our stock is without superior in the State ; in good 
condition, free from all disease. Prices reduced to suit 
the market. Orders solicited, and filled with prompt- 
ness and satisfaction. 

E. W. WOOLSEY & SON, 
Pulton, Sonoma Co., Cal. 

SHEEP DIP. 

Price Reduced to 
$1.25 

PER GALLON. 

j,. Twenty gallons of fluid 
mixed with cold water will 
make 1,200 gallons of Dip. 
It is superior to all Dips and Dressings for Scab in 
Sheep; is certain in effect; is easily mixed, and is applied 
In a cold state. Unlike sulphur or tobacco, or other 

fiolsonous Dips, it increases the growth of the wool, stim- 
ates the fleece, and greatly adds to the yolk. It destroys 
all vermin. It is efficacious for almost every disease (in- 
ternal and external) sheep are subject to. 

FALKNER, BELL & CO-, 

San Francisco. Cal. 





Calvert's Carbolic 

SHEEP WASH. 

93 per Gallon. 

After dlppl ng the Sheep, la use- 
ful for preserving wet hides, de- 
stroying t.:e vine pest, and for 
wheat dressings and disinfecting 

gurposes, etc. T. W. JACKSON, 
. F., Sole Agent for Pacific Coast. 



ITALIAN 



SHEEP WASH 

EXTRACT OF TOBACCO. 

Free from Poison. 

Cures thoroughly the SCA B 
OF THE SHEEP. The 

BEST remedy known. Costs 
!.<••*** than 1 rent per head 
for dipping. Reliable testi- 
monials at our office. For 
particulars apply to 
CHAS. DKI8ENBERG & CO.. Sole Agents, No. 314 Sacra- 
mento Street, San Francisco. 




THOROUGHBRED 

SPANISH MERINO SHEEP. 

The Premium Band 
of the State. 

Took five flrat prem- 
iums exhibited at 
the State Pair in 1881, 
1882, 1883, and all the 
Premiums in 1884. 

Ibis stock has no superior in the United States. 1 
will sell my Bucks and Ewes at prices to suit customers, 
and in all cases guarantee satisfaction. 

Correspondence solicited. Address 

PRANK BULLARD, 

Woodland, Yolo Co., Cal. 




Dr. Ricord's Restorative Pills. 

BUY NONE BUT THE GENUINE. 

A Specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces, etc. 

Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, and by 
medical celebrities of the world. Aorntb for California 
and the Pacific States: 

J. G. STEELE & CO., 
635 Market St., (Palace Hotel) San Francisco, Cal. 
Sent by Hail or Express anywhere. 
PRICES REDUCED— Box of fiO, 81.25; of 100, $2.00; 
of 200, $3.50; of 400, »6.00. Preparatory Pills, $2.00. 
£3TSend for Circular. 

MRS. E. E. KELSEY 

Practical Dress and Cloak Maker, 

CUT BY THE S. T. TAYLOR SYSTEM. 

ALSO, PATTERNS CUT TO ORDER. 

Three Doors South of Postoffice, BERKELEY, CAL. 



25 



a Coihic Transparent and 26 (no 2 alike) Chromo Cards 
name on, 10c Present free. A. Hines, Cassville, O. 



RE MOV AL. 

Please take notice that we have removed our Offices and 
Salesroom to No. 123 CALIFORNIA STREET, where all future com- 
munications should be addressed. Warehouse, as heretofore, at 
Corner of FIFTH and BLUXOME STS. 

GEORG E BULL c*J OO., 

Importers of AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

San Francisco, June 23, 1885. 

IMPERIAL EGG FOOD 

WILL, MAKE YOUR HENS LAY. 
Imperial Egg Food and Disease Cannot Thrive Together in the Same Runs. 



ImcJ 



SEE THAT THIS 



Trade Mark 




IS UPON 



Every Package. 



(Trade Mark.l 

THIS GREAT EOGr PRODTJCEIl 

Is prepared expressly to, and does supply all the needed materials for the formation of the egg, as also for bone, 
muscle and feathers, and by a tonic effect, strengthens the digestive organs and lays the foundation for vigorous, 
healthv, and, therefore, profitable Fowls, fitting them for market a month earlier than bv common means, and mak- 
ing POULTRY THE MOST PROFITABLE STOCK ON THE FA KM. The Imperial Egg Food has 
proved of the greatest assistance to poultry raisers, its unqualified success and popularity having led .to cheap and 
worthless imitations, which fail entirely to produce the material of the egg, or in bringing forward the chicks 
rapidly, and warding off disease, the Imperial, and none other, being constructed on purely scientific and physio- 
logical principle. No farmer or poultry raiser can afford to be without this means of improving the condition of his 
domestic fowls; increasing their egg production, and making them doubly profitable. Secure some at once, and be 
convinced of its great value. Complaints reaching us from all quarters to the effect that inferior goods are palmed 
off upon unsuspecting purchasers, under names so similar to "Imperial" as to be easily mistaken for it, we take this 
occasion to caution all to see that our Trade Mark is upon every package. 

RETAIL PRICES— 1-pound package, 50c.; 2J pounds, SI; 6-pound" box, *2; 10-lb. box, $3; 25-tb. keg, S6.25. 

G. G. WICKS0N & CO., REMOVED to 38 California St., San Francisco. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR 

W.W. GREENER'S BREECH-LOADING 

Double G-uns. 

For Strength, Durability, Style, Finish and Extraordinary 
Shooting Qualities those Guns are unsurpassed. 

COLT, PARKER, SMITH, and REMINGTON 

DoviIdIo Gvms. 

Champion, Forehand & Wadsworth, and 
Remington Single Guns. 

Winchester, Bullard. Colt New Lightning, Marlin, and Kennedy Repeating Rifles. 

BALLARD and REMINGTON SPORTING and TARGET RIFLES. 
Colt and Sxxxitlx cfc? Wesson Pistols. 

AMMUNITION AT LOWEST PRICES. 

N. OURRY & BRO., - 113 Sansome St.. San Francisco. 

Pacific Coast Agents for the Merino Elastic Felt Gun Wads. 




Booth's Sure Death Squirrel Poison 




For Squirrels, Gophers, Birds, Mice, Etc. 

OTEodorsed by the Grange and Farr...rj wherever ustd.lEl 
The Cheapest and Best. 
Put up in 1-pound, 6-pound, and 5-gaIlon tins. 
Every Can Warranted. 

This Poison has been on the market leas than two years, yet 
in this short time it has gained a reputation of "Sure Death," 
equaled by none. By its merits alone, with very little advertising, 
it is now used extensively all over the Pacific Coast, as wall as in 
Australia and New Zealand. 

SEND FOB TESTIMONIALS. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Patented Jan 23d,18E,3. 
For Sale bv all Wholesale and Retail Dealer* 



A. R. BOOTH, San Louis Obispo, Cal. 

Special Terms on Quantities inBulk. 



L. WALKER & SON, 

COMMISSION } VVOOI f MERCHANTS 



WOOL SCOURERS, 360 Town-send St.S.F. 

CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. ADVANCES MADE ON CONSIGNMENTS. 

Agents for Calvert & Co.'s Shropshire Sheep Dip. 



1885, 



1885. 



Mission Rock Grain Dock and Warehouses, 

SAW FRANCISCO. 



Regular Warehouse for S. F. 



Produce Exchange Call Board. 

Storage Capacity for 75,000 Tons of Grain. 

THE CALIFORNIA DRY DOCK CO., Proprietors. 

OLIVER ELDRIDGE, Pres., (JIIAK. H. SINCLAIR, Supt., W. C. GIBBS, Sec'y. 

Freight paid, fire insurance and loans effected, and proceeds forwarded free of commission''. Money advanced at 
lowest rates on grain in warehouse, interest payable at end of loan. Storage season, ending June 1, i - -'>, at reduced 
rates. On all wheat shipped to Mission Kock by barges, freight rates guaranteed the same as to Port Costa. All 
applications for storage or other business addressed to CHAS. H. SINCLAIR, Superintendent. 
OPPICB, 3X8 California St., Room 3. 



LONG LOOKED FOR COME AT LAST ! 

THE PACIFIC 

INCUBATOR 

Hatches Eggs Better than 
a Hen. 

Send Stamp for Illustrated Cir- 
cular to GEORGE B. BAYLEY, 
Manufacturer, 1317 Castro St., 
Oakland, Cal. 

N B. — A large line of Poultry 
Appliances, such as Wire Netting, 
Bone Mills, Chopping Machines, 
etc., for sale at the lowest rates. 

The Pacific Coast Poulterers' 
Hand Book and Guide; price 40c. 




S25 to $300 per MONTH 

Made by Families Using the 

CALIFORNIA INCUBATOR AND BROODER 

Sold on Installments. 

A success guaranteed in raising poultry with our ma- 
chines. Automatic supply of moisture and self-regulat- 
ing. Turns eggs instantly. Best percentage of hatch 
and best chicks obtained. Machines warranted. Send 
for Circular. 

CALIFORNIA INCUBATOR CO., 
401 Tenth St (cor. Franklin), Oakland, Cal. 





THE MODEL. 1 

SELF- REGULATING, 
RELIABLE, 

AND SIMPLE. 



J. M. HALSTED'S 

INCUBATORS 

From $30 up. 
The Model Brooder 
from 85 up. Send 
for circularcontain- 
ing much valuable 
information. 

Thoroughbred 
Poultry and Eggs. 
1011 Broadway, 

Oakland, Cal. 



DEWEY & CO.,. i N t^? to I ?. A ia K iS2n?. T 1 PATENT AGENTS. 



HILLSIDE POULTRY FARM. 

Headquarters for Pure Langshans — the 
Great Egg Producers. 
Early Chicks for sale— single pairs, trios or pens. 
Also, a few choice Light Brahmas and Plymouth Rocks. 
Stock large, strong and vigorous. Eggs that will hatch 
83.00 per 13. 

MRS. J. RAYNOR, 
Frultvale, Alameda Co., Cal. 
iVVisitors take horse cars at East Oakland. 




Importer and Breeder of choice Poultry — Langshans, 
Light Brahmas, Partridge Cochins, Plymouth Rocks. A 
trio of Langshans, imported direct from Croad's Yard, 
England. Eggs and young stock for sale. Send for far- 
ther information. 




CALIFORNIA POUL- 
TRY FARM. 

Headquarters for Thor- 
oughbred Poultry and Eggs. 
We have all the leading and 
most profitable b r e 6 il s. 
i hicks for delivery Sept. 1. 
1885. Agents for White 
Mountain Incubator. Send 
2c. stamp for price list. 

CUTTING & KOBINSON, 
P. O. Box 7, Stockton, Cal. 




D. H. EVERETT, 

1616 Larkln Street, 

San Francisco, 
BRRKDKR of croad strain 
—OF— 

LANGSHANS 

Exclusively. 

Eggs and Breedine Stock for 
Sale. Eggs, 83 for 13. 



EAGLE POULTRY FARM. 

Fruit Vale, Alameda County, Cal. 

RD1JBERNET, BREEDER OF THO- 
• roughbred Fowls. Eggs and Fowls for sale. Brown 
and White Leghorns, 81 per setting. Plymouth Rocks 
and Houdans, 81.50 per setting; White Face Black 
Spanish and Langshans, 82 per setting; Pekin Ducks, 81 
per setting. Money to accompany order. Address, 

R. DUBERNET, 
P. O. Box 75. Brooklyn. Alameda Co., Cal. 




TITTY AN DOTTES, PLY- 
' " mouth Rocks, Light Brah- 
rnas, Langshans, Brown Leg- 
horns, B. B. K Game Bantams, 
Pearl Guineas, Homer Antwerp 
Pigeons. 

J. N. LUND, 

Cor. Piedmont Av. & Booth St., 
P. O. Box 116. 



CALVES and COWS 

Prevented sucking each other, also, self-sucking, by 
Rice's Patent Weaner. Used by all Stock Kaisers. 
Prices by mail, postpaid; For Calves till one year old, 
55 cents; till two years old, 80 cents; older, 81.12. Circu- 
lars free. Agents wanted. 

H. C. RICE, Farmlngton, Coon. 



pAClFie RURAL* PRESS 



[July 11, 1885 



Note.— Our quotations »-e for Wednesday, not Satuidaj 
•he dare w;.ich the paper bears. 



Weekly Market Review. 

DOMESTIC PRODUCE, ETC. 

San Francisco. July 8, 1885. 

Trade matters arc- still quiet and very little doing 
in staple articles. X'he reopening 01 the Kxchang; 
yesterday was the occasion of considerable "call' 
business but produce for useful purposes is dull 
Prices as a rule are the same which have ruled foi 
the last fortnight with a few exceptions which wil 
be noted under the proper headings. Cable advices 
from abroad are conservative. The following is the 
latest on Wheat; 

Liverpool, July 8.— Wheat— Not much de- 
mand. California spot lots 6s lod to 7s id; ofl 
coast, 34s 6d; just shipped, 36s 6d; nearly due, 35s; 
cargoes off coast and on passage, hrm; Mark Lane 
Wheat and Maize, dull; English and French coun- 
try markets, steady; Wheat and Flour in Paris, turn 
dearer; weather in England, showery. 

Freights and Cnarters. 

The following is a summary of the engaged and 
disengaged tonnage here and at adjacent points and 
on the way to this port Monday morning: 

1885. 1884 .» 

Engaged tons in port 26,800 39.800 

Disengaged 93o°° »3L 8 °° 

On the way 189,100 232,300 



Totals 309,400 403.900 

Foreign Review. 
London, July 6.— The Mark Lane Express, in 
its review of the British grain trade during the past 
week says: The easterly winds with accompanying 
drought, which have prevailed, marked the oull x>k 
serious for spring-sown crops. The Wheat acreage 
is in good form. Sales of English Wheat during the 
week were 38,837 quarters, at 33s 3d $ quarter, 
against 28,294 quarters, at 37s id during the corres- 
ponding week of last year. Foreign sellers were 
firm. Six cargoes arrived, two were sold, two were 
withdrawn, and seven remained, including three 
California and one Oregon. To-day fine weather 
and heavy stocks tended to depress values, but the 
market remained unchanged and little business was 
done. Flour is dull and in favor of buyers. 
Maize was cheaper. Harley was unchanged. Oats 
tended in buyers' favor. Beans and Peas were un- 
changed. 

Amount of Grain in Sight. 

Chicago July 7. — The following figures, taken 
from the official stitement of the Hoard of Trade, to 
be posted on 'Change day, show the amount of grain 
in sight in the United Stales and Canada on Satur- 
day, July 4th, and the amount of increase or decrease 
over the same period last year: Wheat — 40,764.217 
bushels; decrease, 568,337. Corn— 5,643.347 bush- 
els; increase, 350,152. Oats— 3,088,595 bushels; 
decrease, 199,273. Kye— 220,748 bushels; decrease, 
13,857. Barley— 100,835 bushels; increase, 1.015. 

BAGS— Bags are still low and naturally so with 
the lessened requirements of a short crop year. At 
auction 243 bales were put up w ith the following re- 
sult: 10 bales standard Oakland Jute, 22x36 at $4.55; 
10 do Dundees, $4.55; 10 do Standard Calcutta Gun- 
nies (damaged), $4.05(^.4.30; 41 do, second hand, 
$3.75 for large Sugar, and 1 He lor small. Calcutta 
Wheat, 5(0)5^0; California Jute, 5)£e; Potato Gun- 
nies, io@iic 

BARLEY Barley is in moderate demand at un- 
changed prices. Call sales to day were as follows: 
Buyer season — too tons, $1.28)^; 100, $i 2%%; 100, 
$i.28i B . Buyer 1885 — 100 tons, Si -m ', . 100, 

$i.2i#; 500, $[.21%; 200, $i.2if»; 100, $i.2tji, 

200, $1.21%; 80O, $1.22; 3OO, $t.22 l /s, lOO, $1.22^. 

Seller 1885— 300 tons, $1.1 1%. Seller 1885, new— 
300 tons, $1.14^ $ ctL Buyer 1885—100 tons, 
$1.22; 100, $1.22)4; 400. $i.22)<; 100, $i.22#; 100, 
41.22K ; 100, $i.22H; 200, $1.23. Seller 1885— 100 
tons, $i.i25i ; ioo, $i.i2i«. Seller 1885, new— 100 
tons, $1.15; 200, $1.15^; $i.!SH fc* ctl. 

BEANS.— Beans are quiet and unchanged, the 
low values still prevailing. 

t'OKN. — Corn is unchanged; choice white and 
yellow going at $i.2<;, with the best second-grade at 
$1.22%. Inferior lots are low. Supplies are re- 
ported large ani the consumption is light. 

1 )AI RY PRODUCE.— There is a very slight im- 
provement in the butler market. Supplies are still 
too large for much change, although some lots of 
fancy butter are bringing 22 eents per pound and 
cheese 10 cents per lb. 1 >airy produce is appar- 
ently on Uie upgrade. 

EGGS. — Eggs have also shown a little improve- 
ment, 22'yi cents being obtained for some strictly 
choice ranch eggs. Eastern eggs are still coming 
by the carload. 

VEGETABLES. — There has been a considerable 
cheapening of cucumbers, peas and beans, tomatoes 
and peppers this week. The river gardens are now 
sending in immense quantities. 

FEED -Hay Jeceipts rre large and the market re- 
ported dull at the decline reached last week. Choice 
wheat and wild oat, $14 per ton. Fair to good lots 
run as follows: Wheat and wild oat, $io(ft 12; barley, 
%~(a 10. stable, %ig(a 13; alfalfa, $10(6 12; cow, $io(|r 
13 per ton. 

FRUIT — Fruit is coming in in very large quanti- 
ties in spite of the exceedingly low rates which pre- 
vail. Berries would seem to little more than pay for 
picking and Ireight. Peaches of all kinds go almost 
at buyers' figures. Ruling prices may be found in 
our table. 

HOPS— There is no change. Quotations are 5(0 
7c per pound, and reports that the best in the mar- 
ket can be had at 6c per pound. 

OATS — Oats are in large supply and offered at 
lower rates, as shown in our list. 

ONIONS— Onions are cut down severely this 
week to $i(a 1.50 per ell for red and white. 

POTATOES — Early Rose are selling as before. 
Some choice Peerless and Chile are selling a little 
better up to 90c per ctl. 

FRESH MEAT— Beef is advanced a fraction 
this week as the decline seems to have stopped ship- 
ments for the time. Pork is plentiful again, but is 



PACIFIC COAST WEATHER FOR THE WEEK. 

[Furnished for publication In this paper by Nblson GoROM, Sergeant Signal Service Corps, TJ. 8. A. 





Portland. 


Red Bluff. 


Sacramento. 


S.Francisco. Los Angeles 


San Diego. 


DATE. 


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July 2 8 








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Fr. 




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Totals 


.(III 








M 
















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.00 









Explanation.— CI. for clear; Cy., cloudy; Fr., fair; Fy 
trine] aud weather at 12:00 M. (Pacific Standard time), with 



rather lean as a rule, and the lard supply is shorten- 
ing and rates improving. Sales of live stock for the 
week, as reported to the Grocer, are as follows: ban 
Francisco Stock Yards. 412 Cattle (large, good) $45; 
597 Cattle (medium, fair) $36; 335 Cattle (mixed, 
ralher thin) $30; 680 Calves $4.25, $5.75, $8, $10, 
$14, $16; 5,294'Sheep, $1.75, $1.85, $2, $2.25, $2.50, 
$2.75, $3.15; 2,835 Lamos, $1, $1,25, $1.50, $1.65, 
$1.7.5, $2.15. $2.25:2,468 Hogs. 3!4c 3&c. 3J4c, 4c, 
4'Ac, 4#c Oakland mock Yards, 175 Cattle llarge, 
good! $46.50; 167 Cattle (medium, fairl $35, 213 
Calves $4.50, $5.75. $6, $9. $13, $t8; 910 Sheep, 
$i-7S. $2. $225. $2-5°. $2 7.S. $3-oo; 540 Lanbs, 
$1,25, $.175, 2.25; 307 Hogs, 4c, 4V6C, 4>^c. 

PROVISIONS — California lard is advancing a 
little, owing to smaller supply. Other meat products 
are unchanged. 

POULTRY AND GAME — Our list shows a drop 
back in turkeys, ducks and geese, also in hare and 
rabbits. Fowls are unchanged. 

WHEAT — There is very little doing for actual 
use, as shippers are aloof. On call the transactions 
to-dav were few, as follows: Buyer season — 100 tons, 
$1.64^; 100, $1.64. Buyer 1885—300 Ions, $1.55^; 
800, $1 -55ft ; 200, $1.56 ft ctl. Buyer season— 300 
ons, $1.63,^8; 200, $1.63^; 400. $1.64. Buyer 1885 
—300 tons. $1.55*1 ; 200, $1.5574; 700, $1.56!^ \i> ctl. 

WOOL — Wooi is very dull, and some kinds re- 
duced ic tti as shown in our list. 

Fruits and Vegetables. 

WHOLESALE. 

Wednkhdat. .inly 1, 1835. 
FRUIT MARKET Poaches 7»,a, S 

Apples, box :tj (s» 65 do pared I2{4» 13 

Aprkots,bx 35 «i 6U Pears, sliced.... 3 

liauauas. buueh. I 5U tip 2 50 do qrtd 1 ® 2 

Blacklierries.cbt 1 (5 (je 3 00 Plums 2 fa 

Chen ies, bx 40 (!» - Pimm pitted 4 

( •lierryplums 20 W 30 

Cantaloupe.!, do* 1 75 ." 3 M 
CraliappUs. box Ufa 50 

Ki,s, ! x 30 fa 65 

t;uoseberrie3. . . . 5 ('< & 
(Jrapes. box 50 W 1 25 

Currauts, chat. . 2 25 i« 2 75 /.ante Currauts. 8 (<* 

Limea, Mex 11 00 012 OU VEGETABLES. 

do Cal. box ... 75 (if 1 25 Asparagus b\ .. 1 UJ fa — 

Leinous, CaL.bx 75 fa 1 50 Artlciiokes, doz. 30 (g — 

do Sicily, box. 7 UO @ 8 0J Beets, ctl 60 (g 75 

do Australian. — @ - Cabbage, 100 lbs. 50 <* r.O 

Nectarines box. 50 <« H Carrots, sk 40 <& 5U 

oranges, Cal., bx 1 OJ (tf 1 50 Cauliflower, doz. 30 @ 40 

do Tahiti, M 9 00 (glu (Kl Celery, doz 60 (g - 

doMexicau.M 13 — Cucumbers box. 25 (of 5j 
do Panama... — <g BgRPfaUIti ho» I 26 " 1 5n 

Peaches, bx. . . 25 @ 40 Garlic, tt> 2' s ts 3J 

do basket. .. 20 (n 4U Green Com, doz 8@ 12} 

Pears bx 40 <« 65 Green Peas, sk . - (tt ■ 

do Bartlott 1 t0 @ 1 75 do sweet, lb. 

Pineapples, doz. 6 UO iff 7 00 Lettuce, doz.... 

Plums lb 14 1} Mushrooms, lb... 

K spberries, ch 2 00 @ 5 00 IJkra, green lb... 

.StniwIierrieB ch. 1 75 (it 3 50 Parsnips, ctl.... 

Watei melon, doz 2 50 «r if 00 Peppers, dry If.. . 

DK1EK FRUIT. do twan.box 
Apples, sUced, lb 2 <g 3 Rhubarb b.,x... 



•1 foggy; — iudicates too small to measure. Temperature 
amouut of rainfall in the preceding 24 hours. 



5 <ce 



PIuiih pitted 

Primes 

do French . 
Raisins, Cal. bx. 2 25 <& 2 50 
do halves.... — (cc — 
do quarters.. — @ — 
do eighths... — @ — 
10 



do evaporated. 

do quartered .. 

Apricots 

Black berries .... 

Citron 

Rates 

Figs, pressed.... 

Pigs, loose 

Nectarines 



9 « 
4 @ 

2 @ 

9 ® 



2 i» 2! 
lo m - 

15 @ 25 

10 m - 

1 00 'c« - 

(a 17 

50 @ 1 00 

l« 1 50 

6 Squash, Marrow 

2 fat, loo 15 00 (520 00 

8) do Summer bx 20 (8 25 

- do Bay 40 «* 10 

30 Tomatoes box.. 25 W 36 

101 River 40 <a 50 

5 String beans 1M 2' 

2t do Fouutain „ 4 

10 Turnips ctl 75 (ft — 



Domestio Produce. 



w n olkha le 



BEANS AND PEAS 

Bayo.ctl 2 «0 d 2 75 

Butter 75 ® 1 25 

Castor 4O0@ - 

Pea 1 50 (ft 1 80 

Red 1 50 fa 1 05 

Pink 1 35 @ 1 50 

Large White.... 3 00 (8 - 
Small White.... 1 50 @ 1 80 

Lima 1 GO @ 1 75 

K id Peas,blk eye 1 25 S 1 50 

do green @ 

BROOM CORN. 

Southern 3 <g Si 

Northern ( ''■ 6 

CHICCORY. 

California 4 

German 64@ 

DAIRY PRODUC 

BUTTER. 

Cal fresh roll. lb. 17J@ 

do Fancy br'uda 21 fa 

Pickle roU 15 (jg 

Firkin, new 15 @ 

Eastern 15 @ 

New York — @ 

cheese 

Cheese. Cal., It.. 6 fa 

Eastern style... 16 @ 

KUUH. 

Cal.. ranch, doz.. 20 fa 

do, store 18 fa 

Ducks — fa 

Oregon — fa 

Easteru. by ex . . 1G fa 
Pickledhere.... - & 

Utah — fa 

FEED. 

Bran, ton 15 00 fa\ 

Cornmeal 28 00 (g 30 00 

Hay 8 00 @14 00 

Middlings 20 00 @22 50 

Oil Cake Meal. 30 00 & 

Straw, bale 50 fa 65 

FLOUR. 
Extra, City Mi 11b 4 25 fa 5 00 
do Co'ntry Mills 4 00 fa 4 62: 

Superfine 2 75 fa 

FRESH MEAT 
Beef.lst qual , lb 
Second... , 
Third 



7 

ETC. 
20 
"I 

m 

18 



IS 



nil 



50 



6M 
1 



Wednesday. July 1, 1885 

NUTS— Jobbino. 
Walnuts. Cat., lb . <t 8 

do Chile. ".; •< 8 
Almonds, hdahL 7 fa 8 

Soft shell 10 «t 12 

Brazil 10 fa II 

Pecans 9 fa 10 

Peanute 3 fa 5 

Filberts 14 fa - 

POTATOES. 

Burbuukse — @ — 

Karly Rove 25 B 75 

CulfcyCo —fa 

Petaluma fa — 

Tomales — ■ — 

River reds @ — 

Humboldt — ■ — 

do Kidney.... — fa 
do Peachblow. fa 

Jersey Blue fa 

Chile 60 fa C.5 

do Oregon ... fa 

Peerless 75 fa 90 

Salt Lake — @ — 

Sweet ctl - fa 

POULTRY AND GAME 

Hens, doz 5 00 fa 7 00 

Roosters r . 00 fa 7 00 

Broilers 2 50 fa 4 00 

Ducks, tame.... 3 00 
Geese, pair 1 25 

Wild Gray, doz fa 

White do... 75 fa 1 00 
TurkeyB, lb 14 fa 

do Dressed.. — fa 
Turkey Feathers, 

tail and wing.. 10 fa 
Snipe, Eng., doz. 1 50 fa 

do Comuioo.. 75 & 

Quail — fa 

Rabbits 1 CG @ 

Hare 1 75 

Venison 6 

PROVISIONS 
Cal. Bacon, 

Heavy, lb 

Medium 

Light 

Extra Light. .. 

Lard 

Cal SmokedBeef 
Shoulders 



1 50 

2 00 



17 



n 




Mutton 

Spring Lamb 

PorU. undressed. 

Dressed 

Veal 

GRAIN, ETC. 
Barley, feed. ctl. 1 ■ « 1 

do Brewing 

Chevalier 

do Coast... 
Buckwheat . . . 
Corn, White.. 

Yellow 

Small Round. 1 25 IS 1 

Nebraska 1 05 fa 1 

Oats, choice 1 30 fa 1 

do No 1 1 15 fa 1 

do No. 2 1 07 fa 1 



jja 
jaS 



1 20 a 1 
1 20 fa 1 
1 10 fa 1 

1 25 (& 1 
1 2248 1 

1 22 <a 1 



1 10 ( 

1 15 @ 



1 IS fa 1 

1 45 fa 



do black 
do Oregon. . 

Rye 

Wheat, No. 1 
do No. 2. . . 1 4213 
Choice milling 1 471® 1 
HIDES. 

Dry 16|<a 

Wet salted 7\fa 

HONEY, ETC. 

Beeswax, lb 26 fa 

Honey in comb. 
Extracted, light, 
do dark. 

HOPS 

Oregon — fa 

California. 4 & 

Wash. Ter — @ 

Old Hops — fa 

ONIONS 

Red 1 00 fa 

Silverskin 1 25 fa 

do Oregon.... — & 
do Utah — <a 



Hams. Cal 10]« 

do Eastern.. 12j| 
SEEDS. 

Alfalfa 12^ 

do Chile — 

Canary 3JS 

Clover red 4 6 

White 46 $ 

Cotton 20 S 

Flaxseed 

Hemp 3(6 

Italian RyeGrass 26 ( 

Perennial 25 <t 

Millet, German.. 10 6 
do Common. 7 « 
Mustard, white.. 2i<| 

Brown 3{| 

Rape 2 4 

Ky Blue Grass.. 20 i 

2d quality 16 I 

Sweet V. Grass. 7t 

Orchard. 20 

Red Top 11 

Hungarian.... - 

Lawn St 

Mesquit 10 

Timothy 6 

TALLOW. 



4 fa - 



26 




5 fa 




12J 


Retiued 


7r@ 






WOOL, ETC. 






8PRINO- 


1885. 






Mi'iiilocino and 










18 fa 


20 






15 <a 


17 




San Joaquin. . . 


11 fa 


13 




South Coast. . . . 


10 @ 


13 




Calaveras and 








Foothill 


14 fa 


16 


50 


Oregon, Eastern 


13 i" 


17 




ilj Valley. . 


16 «« 


20 



Aver's Ague Cure is a warranted specific for all 
malarial diseases and biliary derangements. 



Panorama viaitoia ahonld be provided with 

M tiller's opera glasses. 136 Montgomery street, 
near Hush. x 



VUUTABD LaBi'REKH WHO CNnKRKTANP THEIR HI SIXKER, 

also Fanners, Teamsters, Carpenters, anil others, fur- 
nished quickly by sending; your orders to .1. K. CROSETT 
& CO., (12s Sacramento street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE- Parties wishing local agencies to reprcs'nt 
our Nurseries lor the stlcof nurstotk, will please address 
J. I.iisk Si SOX, Box 0, North Teinescal, Oakland, Cal 



CRYSTAL SPRINGS. 

This Desirable 

Summer Resort and Sanitarium, 

Situated on Howell Mountain, 2} 
miles N. W. of St. Helena 
IS OPEN 

To those seeking health, or rest and recreation. Scenery 
is unsurpassed. Air baton) , tree from togs and malaria. 
Water pure and soft, from a fine spring'. Bathing facili- 
ties first-class. O001I Gymnasium. Carriage and horso- 
back riding. An experienced physician and surgeon, 
with gentlemen and lad \ assistants, will attend .11 cases 
needing his cuie. Excellent facilities for treatment. 
Terms reasonable. Send for Circular or "Come and see." 
Address RURAL HEALTH RETREAT. 

St. Helena. Cal 




RUPTURE! 

A Ncnr Invention I The "Perfortlon* 
Belt Tints, with Universal Jumt Movo- 
11 1. 'nt mi'l BolfHwl Justing HpiriU £|>rinif. 
\VorawithiM5rfoct«*in(ortiiiglitand(Li7 
•Jivcsunivcrwilsatisu-ctioJi. Pr(ce,troua 
13 to 66> Call or send for d<-Hcri|itiva 
circular. Addrvss, J. II. WIIUtKB. 
( l>niL.xist 1 701 £1 jxket Street, cue Third, 



Twin Foes to Life 

Are Intlist'stion ami Constipation. 
Their primary symptoms ire umong the 
most distressing of minor human ailments, 
and a, host of diseases, speedily reauttant 
from them, mutually aggravate each other 
and assail at oncu the wliole machinery 
of life. Nausea, Foul Breath, Sour 

■> .11 h. I .' 1 / / i 11. ■-s. lleadarhes, 

Bilious Kot er, Jaundice, Qyapepbia, 
Kidnej Diseases, Piles, Hheiinmtlain, 
Neuralgia, Dropsy, and various Skin 
Disorders, are among the symptoms 
and maladies caused by derangement of 
the stomach and bowels. 

A Thorough Purgative 

medicine is the first necessity for cure. 
Then the cathartic effect must be main- 
tained, in a mild degree, juat suffieient 
to prevent a recurrence of oouHveness, 
and at the same time the liver, kidneys 
aud stomach must be stimulated and 
strengthened. 

Ayer's Pills 

Accomphah this restorative work better 
than any other medicine. They are 
searching and thorough, yet mild, in their 
purgative action. They do not gripe the 
patient, and do not Induce 11 costive re- 
action, as is the effect of other cathartics. 
Withal, they possess special properties, 
diuretic, hepatic and tonic, of the highest 
medicinal value and 

Absolutely Cure 

All diseases proceeding from disorder 
Of the digestive and assimilatorv organs. 
The prompt use of ATRK'S PIMA to 
correct the first indications of costive- 
ness, averts the serious illnesses which 
neglect of that condition would inevitably 
induce. All irregularities in the action of 
the bowels — looseness as well as consti- 
pation — are beneficially controlled by 
A ykk's l'li.t.s. and for the stimulation 
of digestive organs weakened by long- 
continued dvspepsia. one or two of 
Ay En's Pills daily, after dinner, will do 
more good than anything else. 

Leading Physicians Concede 

Thai AtKB'8 PlLLB are the best of all 
cathartic medicines, and many practition- 
ers, of the highest standing, customarily 
prescribe them. 

AYER'S PILLS, 

PREPARED BY 

Or. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

[Analytical Chemists.] 
For sale by all Druggists. 




STUDABECKER'S TAILORS' SQUARE. 

A Perfert System of Ureas Catting. 
Okhcs-224 Stockton Street, San Francisco. 

£V 1 ' • - cut to measure. Tteceivcd diploma at 
Median lew' Institute Fair, 1888. 

WINE 

M A U r D C HhonW send fur our NKW TRC C 



Itooiner 

.Syracuse, N. 



KfiH<-liert Press 



RUPTURE 

Il'.i itiv, ly cured in 60 days by 

fi*r. Ilnrni . ] It. I ft i \l at in I . ^ 

ISt'lt-Trunn, ounibined. Guarun 
I the only one in the world 
? a continuous Etectricd? May 
•lie Current. Scientific, Powerful, Purablv, 
omfortablc and EffcctWe in curinsr Hup* 
turc. Price Reduced. 500 cured in 84. Send for iiamiihlet. 
BltBCTBO-MAONBiriC TBVM l»lrY, 
702 Mahkkt St. San Vkancisoo. 





D. N. & O. A. HAWLEY, 

501 tn nat MARK ET STREET, Han KraneUco 



WAKELEE'S 



THE BEST 



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DON'T BUY 

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Inferior Article 

BKCAIKK IT III 

More Profitable 
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else. 



SQUIRREL AND GOPHER EXTERMINATOR! 

IN 1-LB. AND 5-LB. CANS. 



July 11, 1885.] 



fACIFie RURALd press. 



33 



, HALL'S 

S ARS APARILLA 

Cures all Diseases originating from 
a disordered state of the BLOOD or 
LIVER. Rheumatism, Neuralgia, 
Boils, Blotches, Pimples, Scrofula, 
Tumors, Salt Rheum and Mercurial 
Pains readily yield to its purifying 
properties. It leaves the Blood pure , 
the Liver and Kidneys healthy and 
the Complexion bright and clear. 

J. R. CATES & CO. Proprietors, 

417 Sansome St. San Francisco 



STOCKTON 

SAVINGS and LOAN SOCIETY, 

(Incorporatbd August, 1S67.) 
STOCKTON, .... CALIFORNIA. 

Paid up Capital, $500,000. 

Surplus, $152,634. 

L. U. SHIPPEE, President. 
K. M. WEST, Cashier. S. S. LITTLEHALE, Ass't Cashier 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: 



L. U. Shipper, 
R. B. Lank, 
Ciias. Haas, 
A. W. Simpson, 
J. H. O'Brien, 

Wm. INOLIS, 



R. Gnekow, 
Otis Prrrin, 
h. t. dorrance, 
F. Arnold, 
M. L. Hewitt, 
Chas. Gkuph, 
John Dicker. 



UNION SAVINGS BANK 

OAKLAND, CAL. 

CAPITAL $200 000 

RESERVED FUND $100,000 

ASSETS $1,931,000 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: 
A i Henry. J. We t Martin, 0. J. Aiiisworth, 
J. C Aiiisworth, S. Huff, R. S. Farrelly. 

R. W. Kirkhain, Samuel Woods. D. Henshaw Ward, 

Hi' am Tubbs, H. A. Palmer. 

West M»rtin, Pres. H. A. Palmer, V. Pres. & Treas'r. 

INTERKST allowed upon all deposits remaining 
three calendar months, beginning from the first Oi" the 
month succeeding the date of deposit. 

Remittances from the country may be made by Express 
or Check upon Banks in San Francisco, and bo.k will 
be returned. 

LOANS made only upon Mortgage of Real 
Estate and Bonds at current rates. 

GRANGERS' BANK 

OF CALIFORNIA, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Authorized Capital, • - $1,000,000 

In 10,000 Shares of $100 each. 

Capital Paid up in Gold Coin, $645,360. 

Reserved Fund and raid up Stock, $21,178. 
OFFICERS: 

A. D. LOGAN President 

I. C. STEELE Vice-President 

ALBERT MONTPELLIER Cashier and Manager 

FRANK McMULLEN Secretary 

DIRECTORS: 

A. T). LOGAN, President Colusa Count)' 

H J LEWELLING Napa Counti 

J. h. GARDINER Rio Vista, Cal 

T. E. TYNAN Stanislaus County 

URIAH WOOD Santa Clara County 

J. C. MERYFIELD Solano County 

H. M. LARUE Yolo County 

I. C. STEELE San Mateo County 

THOMAS McCONNELL Sacramento County 

C. J. CRESS EY Merced County 

SENECA EWER Napa County 

CURRENT ACCOUNTS are opened and conducted in the 

usual way, bank books balanced up, and statements of 

accounts rendered every month. 
LOANS ON WHEAT and country produce a specialty. 
COLLECTIONS throughout the Country are made 

promptly and proceeds remitted as directed. 
GOLD and SILVER deposits received. 
CERTIFICATES of DEPOSIT issued payable on demand. 
BILLS OF EXCHANGE of the Atlantic States bought 

and sold. ALBERT MONTPELLIER, 

Cashier and Manager. 

Ran Francisco, Jan. 15, 1882. 



Lapdg for Sale apd Jo Let, 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half-rear ending .lime SO, 18S. r ), the Board of 
Directors of ihe German Savings ami Loan Society has 
declare 1 a dividend at the rate of four and one-half (4$) 
per cent, per annum, on term deposits, and thr.e and 
three-fourths (3J) rer cent, per annum, on ordinary de- 
posits, and payable on and after the 1st dav of Julv, IMS. 
By order. GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 

Splendid!— Latett Style chromo cards, name, 10c. Pre- 
mium with 3 packs. F. H. PARDEE, New Haven, . 



240 ACRES OF LAND, 

Five Miles from Yolo Station, for $6,000 

Twenty-three and one-half Standard Bushels of 
good milling Wheat per acre, just har- 
vested. Terms easy . Apply to 

CLAUDE V. BURKE, - - Yolo, Cal 



e. h tucker, 
Land Broker, 

MAIN STREET, 

Selma, Fresno Co., - California. 

A BARGAIN. 

WE OFFER FOR SALE 80, 160 or 320 acres of Choice 
Land. Soil rich chocolate colored gravelly loam; all 
cultivated, located in the foothills, south of and over- 
looking the town of Livermore. Will sell cheap to 
an immediate purchaser. Apply to or address 

McAFEE BROS., Land Agents, 
234 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

FRESNO COUNTY REAL ESTATE. 



SEEK A HOMH in one of the best agricultural 
regions of the Pa iflc Coast Fresno County, in the 
famous San Joaquin Valley, the acknowledged fruit and 
vine-growing region of California. 

Lands in all sized tracts. Water, for irrigation, in 
abundance. Colony system great success. Address 
S. N. GRIFFITH. 

Fresno City, Cal. 



2,506?, ACRES OF GOOD LAND. 

One-third Farming Land, balance good Vine, Fruit and 
Pasture Lands, in Monterey County, 40 miles S. W. from 
Solei'ad; part of the Milpitas Ranch. A living ttream 
runs two miles through the land, and several tine springs, 
.lolon stage station is on the ranch. Price, SIP per acre. 
Terms, } osh, balance in one y ear at 7 per cent. For 
further particulars apply to 

T. ELLSWORTH. 
22 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

30,000 ACRES TO LEASE FOR 

1 to 7 Years. 

Splendid grazing Lands, of which 1,500 acres are good 
agricultural lands, being a portion of the Milpitas Ranch, 
Monterey County, watered by the San Antonio River, 
also by Mission Creek and several never-failing springs, 
well timbered and on the stage road. Climate delightful; 
15 cents per acre. For further particulars applv to 
T. ELLSWORTH, 
22 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

LAND FOR SALE. 

Fire Hundred and Twenty five (525) acres, 5 miles of Fel 
ton Depot, S. P. C. R. R.. Snuta Cruz Co., on Ben Lomond 
Mountain ; 2 commodious dwelling-houses, 2 barns, out- 
houses, blacksmithshnp, poultry -yard, 20 ac es fruit-tree: 
bearing, 20 acres viney til, 80 acres open fanning land, bal- 
auce heavy timber, r dwood, oak, et.-. Abundant pupply of 
water; tine water in house from reservoir. A good mil] site 
$80 per acre. Terms liberal. 

P. PETERSON, Santa Cruz, Cal. 



LA2STD. 

In 12 Best Californian Counties. 

For descriptive price list of desirable Ranches, Farms. 
Vineyards and Californian Real Estate generally, applv 
to 

HENRY MEYRICK, Real Eatatc Exchange and Hart, 
Santa Cruz, Cat. 



THE DIXON CRUCIBLE CO. 

JERSEY CITY, N. J. 

Manufacturers of 

DIXON'S BLACK LEAD CRUCIBLE 5. 
DIXON'S LEAD PENCILS. 
DIXON'S STOVE POLISH. 
DIXON'S AXLE GREASE. 
DIXON'S PLUMBAGO. 
DIXON'S BLACK LEAD. 
DIXON'S GRAPHITE. 

J G. ALLEN, 

Sole Agent for the Pacific Coast 
106 Davis St. (near California), San Francisco 
tyPriccs same as at Factory. 



PROP7IETS SAY 

It will he rainy DOM summer. Thct 
save your liav. Our circular demrtbM 
the inly carrier tiiut horse returuu to 
loai. and run* fittier way without 
changing am thine. Bin bargain to 
nrro lu. p It. Don't ftrgei thi->. liux 414. 
WWBV B1*<»1 - iUnrlmi. O. 

OBORN BROS.. Marlon, Obio. 




Educational. 



apCWTC WANTED for the History of Christianity, 
Hutlllo by Abbott. A grand chance. A $4 book 
at the popular price of $1.75. Liberal terms. The re- 
ligious papers mention it as one of the few great religious 
works of the world. Qreater success never known b 
agents. Terms free. ST' N80N & CO., Publishers, I'oi I 
land. Maina 



LITTON SPRINGS COLLEGE 

Sonoma County, Cal- 

This institution has the advantages of country location 
and of entire exemption from the temptations incident 
t) cities and towns. The climate is fine and the build 
ings are large and commodlou*. There are 800 acres of 
land, a dairy of '20 cows, and an orchard and vineyard, to 
which boys have access at all recesses. The drainage is 
perfect, and in the 15J years of its history the school has 
not lost a hoy by death -the best testimony to the ex- 
cellence of sanitary conditions and to the care taken of 
b ivs' health. In the great universities of the East, the 
highest honors that have been gained by Californian 
students have been won by members of this school. 

JOHN GAMBLE, B. A.. Principal. 



LARGE PAY FOR ACTIVE AGENTS 

The People's Cyclopoedia ! 

New 3- Volume Editi in. 45,000 per year earned by one Agent. 

STODDARD'S LIFE OF LINCOLN. 

Just ready. Immense sale. 
Full Line of Choice New Books by Subscription. 

PHILLIPS & HUNT, - - 1041 Market St., San^Francisco. 




'"pRINITY SCHOOL— CHURCH, BOARDING AND 
L Dav School for Young Men and Boys, 1534 Mission 
St. , San Francisco. Prepares for College and University. 
Christmas Session opens 'I hursday, July 23, 1SS5. Refers 
to— Wm. K. Babcock, Esq., Col. K. E. Eyre, Jos ph 
Powning, Kfq , Gen. L. H. Allen, Wm. T. Coleman, Esq., 
Geo. W. Gibbs, Esq. For information, address, REV. E. 
B. SPALDING, Rector. 

CALIFORNIA MILITARY ACADEMY, 

OAKLAND, CAL. 




Term 7 begins ^Monday, JULY 20, 1885, 

COL. W. H. O'BRIEN, Principal. 

IRVING INSTITUTE, 

A Boarding and Day School 
FOR YOUNG LADIES, 

1036 Valencia Street. San Francisco. 

THE SEX r SESSION 

Will Begin July 27, 1885. 

Rev. EDW. B. CHURCH, A M., Principal. 



THE HOME SCHOOL 

FOR YOUNG LADIES, 

1825 Telegraph Ave., OAKLAND, CAL. 

(Founded in 187'2 by the late Miss H. N. FiELU.) 

•Gives tbcrough instruction in foundation studies. 
Admits special students. Prepares for the State Uni- 
ver. ity ami for any of the Eastern Colleges. The Four- 
teenth Year will begin on Wednesday, July 29, 1885. 
Address MISS L TRACY. 



THE HARMON SEMINARY, 

Berkelev. Cal. 

L BOARDING AND DAT SCHOOL FOB 
YOUNG LADIES. 

Pupils taken at any time. 
For Catalogue or other informat on, address : 

THE MISSES HARMON. Berkeley, Cal. 

Or E. J. WICKSON, 414 Clay St.. S. F. 



NAPA C0LLEG1 

NAPA CITY, CAL. 

The Fall Session Will Open 
JULY 29, 1885. 

238 STUDENTS LAST YEAR. 
Faculty Consists of 12 Members. 

OPEN TO BOTH SEXES 

With Classical, Philosophical, and Scientific courses lead- 
ing to the degrees of A, B., B Ph.", and B. S. 
Thorough course in Music, Art, and Elocution. 
The several Departments are in charge of teachers of 

experience and ability, chosen with special reference to 

their work. 

The Commercial Department is well provided with 
facilities for acquiring a Tiiokoi un Practical Bt sinkss 
Education. 

Delightful climate, pleasant surroundings, with home 
on grounds where parents may know that their sons and 
daughters are carefully guarded, and under the direct 
supervision of the faculty. 

Catalogue or information address 

A. E. LASHER, President- 

HOPKINS ACADEMY. 

OAKLAND, OAL. 

Rev. H. E. JEWETT, Principal. 

NEXT TERM 

Begins Tuesday, July 28, 1885. 

<®-SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



W. E. Chamberlain, Ja. 



T. A. Robinson. 




Returned to new building, former location, 320 Post 
street, where students have all the advantages of elegant 
halls, new furniture, first-class facilities, and a full corps 
of experienced teachers. 

LIFE SCHOLARSHIPS $75. 

Ladies admitted into all departments. Day and Even 
ing Sessions during the entire year. 
IS"Call, or send for Circular to 

CHAMBERLAIN & ROBINSON, Prop's. 

MISS BISBEE'S SCHOOL 

FOR YOUNG LADIES, 

1020 Oak Street, - - Oakland, Cal 

WILL RE-OPEN" 

Wednesday, JULY 29, 1885. 



SACKETT SCHOOL 

English, Classical and Commercial Courses 
of Study. 

STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS In all Respects. 

The next School Year will begin Monday, J uly 20, 
1885. Send address, for Catalogue, to 



D. P. 



SACKETT, A. IS., Principal, 
529 Hobart St., Oakland, Cal. 



BOWENS ACADEMY, 

University Avenue, - Berkeley, Cal. 

Preparatory, Commercial, and 
Academic Departments. 

NEXT TERM REU1NS 

Monday, July 20, 1885 Send for Circulars to 

T. STEWART BOWENS, B. A., T. C. D., Principal 



IE A! .03 



BUSINESS 
COLLEGE, 

24 Post St. S. F. 

Liend for Circular. 



ST. MATTHEW'S HALL, 



San Mateo, Cal. 



LL. 
O 

C/5 
OC 
Ul 



OC 
33 

o 



o 
z 
< 

IS 

t- ■» 

33 
Q. 
LU 

OC 




o 

30 



O 
30 



30 



£ 30 



C/5 
CO 



o 



05 



The 



Next Term Commences Thursday, July 23, 1885 

FOR CATALOGUE ADDRESS 

Rev. ALFRED LEE BREWER, M. A., Principal. 



34 



f>ACIFI6 RURAId fRESS. 



[Jdly 11, 1885 



Copissioii jvierchapts. 



CHRISTY & WISE, 

AGENTS FUR 

WOOL GROWERS 

AND 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

FOR THK SALE OF 

Wool, Hides, Tallow, Grain, Live 
Stock, etc. 

A Large Supply of Bucks Constantly on 
Hand. Also, Wool Bags, Twine, Dips, 
and all Ranch Suppliss, fur- 
nished customers at 
Lowest Rates. 

OFFICE AN1> WAKEHOI SK: 

N. E cor. Fifth a^d Townsend Sts., S. F 

Kg Long experience warrant* us in promising sit is 
factory results. 

ggTWt are always prepared to make liberal advances 
on Wool at lowest rates of interest. 



F.STAKL1SIIKD ISCy. 

WM. H. ROUSE & CO, 

30l> Davis St.. San Francisco, 

General Commission Merchants. 

■ ^sig> mknts or 
Grain, Potatoes, Beans, Fruit. Dried Fruits 

et"., solicited. Also want Poultry, Egus. Hides, Pells 
Honey and Beeswax. Dairy Pioduce Lai gel y dealt in 
Prompt returns made and satisfaction guaranteed. In 
terior order* carefu'ly filled. 



MOORE. FERGUSON & CO.. 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

WOOL, GRAIN, FLOUR, 

ETC., ETC. 
Members of the San Francisco Produce Exchange 

310 Calllornla St, San Francisco. 
gg" Liberal advances made on consignments. 



Geo. Morrow. [Established 1854 ] Geo. P. Morrow. 

GEORGE MORROW & CO., 

HAY and GRAIN 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

39 Clay Street and 28 Commercial Street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
gST SHIPPING ORDERS A SPECIALTY.'** 



H. E 3Vg O XT A. Ii. 

DALTON BROS.. 

Commission Merchants 

AND DKALBR8 IN 

CALIFORNIA AND OREGON PRODUCE, 

GREEN AND DRIED FRUITS, 

Grain, Wool, Hides, Beans, and Potatoes. 

308 and 310 DAVIS ST., 
P. 0. Box 1930. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Kg CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. "BS 

Grangers' Business Association, 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION HOUSE, 

No. 38 California St., - San Francisco 

Consignments of GRAIN, WOOL, DAIRY PRODUCE, 
Dried Fruit, Live Stock, etc, solicited, and liberal ad- 
vances made on the same. 

Careful and prompt attention paid to orders for tin 
purchasing of Grain and Wool Sacks, Wagons, Agricult 
ural Implements, Provisions, Merchandise, and supplies 
of all kinds. 

Warehouse and Wharf: 

At "THE GRANGERS'," Contra Costa Co 

Grain received on storage, for shipment, for sale on 
oon9ignmcnt. Insurance effected and liberal advances 
made at lowest rates. Farmer* may rely on their grain 
being closely and carefully weighed, and on having their 
other interests faithfully attended to. 



FKTRK MBTRR. 



louis mm. 



MEYER BROS. & CO., 

Importers and 

Wholesale Grocers 

And Dealers in 

f TOBACCO AND CIGARS. "» 

412 FRONT STREET. 

Front St. Block, bet. Clay & Washington, San Francisco 
aWSpectal attention given to country traders. 
P. O. Box 104O 



CONCRETE BUILDINGS. 

til LOS AND RESERVOIRS. 
U&NSOMB, 402 Montgomery St.. S. F. Send for Circular. 



LAND CLEARIN G WITH JUD SON POWDER. 

RAILROAD MEN, FARMERS AND VITIOULTDRISTS HAVE, 

by practical experience, found that the JUDSON row DER especially, is the best adapted to REMOVE 

STUMPS and TREES. 

FROM 5 TO 80 POUNDS OF THIS POWDER will always bring any sized stump or tree with 
roots clear out of the ground. The EXPENSE IS LESS THAN ONE-HALF the cost of Grubbing. 

In most instances, Giant Powder, or any other "High Explosive," is too uick, and ordinary Blasting Powder 
not strong enough. 

fgl'oi particulars how to use the same, apply to 

BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., General Agents 

GIANT POWDER COMPANY, 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 




This is a cut of our very elegant anil excellent abdoni 
ini.il support for ladies. It tits the form pcrfecth , and 
for the support it gives is worth all we ask for it.' It is 
not only a support and prote. tion to the spine and abdo- 
men, but it contains our Magnetic Shield, which 
relieves all aches and pains in a few minutes; strengthens, 
tones and revitalizes all the weak organs and tissues in a 
few months. 

There are thousands of wome.i in all parts of the coun- 
try who arc Uniting these lielts their Mil] relief. There 
is warmth, comfort, life and action secured from wear- 
ing them. They wear for years, and do not lose their 
virtue. 

We have tried all kinds and clashes of curative agents; 
wc haic had years ol experience in treating ad forms ol 
female complaints, and this b It is worth all the drugs, 
manlpu ation, bandana, supports, pads and plasters on 
the market. When the back is lame, tender o, sore, wear 
this belt. When the kidneys are too active, too sluggish, 
inflamed, or are diseased with any form of kidney 
trouble* put the belt on. When there is inaction of 
the bowel*, put the belt on. When there are anv abdom- 
inal troubles, known as female ailmentJ, put the belt 
on. and we will risk our reputation that rc'ief and cure 
will come quicker than by tnc application or use ol any 
lther treatment Ladies, try these magnetic belts, for 
n them is coin ort aud help for you in all vour special 
ailments. 

13-Send for "Plain Road to Health." Free. 

CHICAGO MAGNETIC SHIELD CO., 

108 Post St., San Francisco. 



THE CHIEF STEP-LADDER. 




Send your orders to the Manufacturer ami Sole Pro. 
prii I >r tor the Pacific Coast, C. W. WESTON, ail 
Mission Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



MUSIC BOOKS 

For Schools and Sunday Schools, Temper- 
ance, Musical and other Meetings and 
Institutes. For all, Uitson & Co., 
publish very superior New 
Music Books. 

That most succcisftil 
Sunday School Song 
Book.Smur Worship (3> cts ) by Em- rson t Sherwin, 
and a'so the perfectly charming Picture Song Book for 
Infant Classes, Fresh Flowers (25 cts ) by Emma 

For High Schools7^ e ,;^ r ft"? 

Good Instructions, and the best of Part 



For Sunday Schools 



O Eincrso 
Songs. 



For Common Schools. ^*o"«nownand 



School Songs, Song 



favorite collection of 
Hells (.10 cts ) by U O. Emerson, 



For Primary Schools. 



The best ,,f little 
Song Books, gay 
with pictures, and sweet with nice poetry and music. 
Gems for Little Singers (,'io cts.) b\ Emerson and 



Just ready, Kinder- 
garten Chimes. 



or Kindergartens 

Hoards, SI. 26; Cloth, .*1.50. 



■flpPianfl PlauOPC A verv superior hook of 
Ul ibiiu r la y ci Oi piano pieces, Piano 
ClaasicH, SL50 cloth; $1.00 Boards. Also, just ruady, 
Loaves of shamrock, a choice collection of the 
most musical Irish airs, arranged for Piano. 
tli ' Any Book Mailed for the Retail Prioe. 

OLIVER OITSON & CO., Boston. 

II. DIT80N A CO.. . 867 Broadway. Nrw York. 



Amibli/» Liver Pillf. u.ire rheumatism and headache. 



AGRICULTURAL WORKS. 

JOHN Li. HEALD, Proprietor, 

Crockett, Contra Costa Co., Cal, 

MAM KACT1KKK OK 

HEALD'S PATENT 

Wine Making Machinery. 

TH IB 

t*j the <»nl.v machinery that has ffiven universal satisfac- 
tion, an<i ia t«> )>e f und in all the tlrst clans Wine Cellars 
in the S'ate. The Patent ('rushers, Stemmers, ami Kit - 
vators, includes the elevation of grapes in boxes aq well 
as loose. Capacity » »f large Crusher and Steruiner up t<> 
1ft tons per hour. Hand Crushers, or Crushers and 
Stemmers that can he worked by hand, horse, or steam 
power to a capacity of 10 to .'*o tons per day. 

My Hydraulic Wine I'rcss has a ca- acity nf four times 
that of any other press in the market, and will sa\e from 
$1 to $3 worth of w ine at ci< li pressing over all others. 
Wine-makers can not afford to use any other press if they 
desire to save money in w ine and labor. Wine Pumps, 
Pomace Cars, or any other appliance needed in a Wine 
Cellar, such as Hoilcrs, KngineR, Shafting, Pulleys, etc , 
new or second-hand, for s-dc at lowest prices. Plans and 
sjw-citications for Wine Cel'ars furnished at lowest figun s. 

If you w ant the best Irrigation or Drainatrc Pump, call for 
one of "J* I*. II raid's Centrlfucal/' guaranteed to 
pump water at a cost not to exceed 5*» cents per acre for 
irrigation, which is much cheaper than ditch water, and 
is tnc only Centrifugal Pump that can be run by horse 
power. 

Get one of •*lI*'iild , H Barley Crushers" if \ou 

want the best in the market. Capacity up to 10 tons per 
hour. It took the first premium at State Kair, 1*M. 

HealtTs Patent Straw-Burning: Engine has 
proved itself for year* to be the best, and took first pre- 
mium at State Fair, 1864. 

Heald's I'.ii. ni Steam Kiigine Governor has 
given entire satisfaction wherever used, in adding ]ft per 
cent more power to the Kiighie, and, with speeder attach- 
ment, enables the Kngine to run at any speed required, 
with the utmost regularity. This governor will main- 
tain the same speed under varying pressure or load. 



Wheeler Patent Cannery, 

MADE OF ALL SIZES. 

The Safest, Quickest, and Highest 
Endorsed 

Of all appliances Icr the cooking of hermetically-sealed 
(.'nods. rteserting Fruits iu Glass as safely nd 
as well as in Tin. 

No Orchaidist Should be Without One 

THE WHEELER FRUIT MR. 

The Finest Appearing, the Safest and 
Most Convenient ever Introduced 
to the Public. 

it* •■ - Km Circulars. 

WHEELER FRUIT PACKING CO., 

31 3 Sacramento Street. San Francisco. Cal. 

POWELL'S PAT. DERRICK 

And Nets. 

Indispensable to be a Successful Farmer. 





HORTON 

FAMOUS 

ENTERPRISE 

Self-Regulating 

WINDMILL 

Is recognized a 
thk Bust. 

A I ways gives satisfaction. SIMPLE, 
STRONG and DURABLE in all part* 
8olid Wrought-iron Crank Shaft with 
doubli bkarinob for the Crank to 
work in, all turned and run in adjust- 
able babbitted boxes. 

Positively Self-Regulating, 

With no coll springs, or springs of any kind. No little 
rdds, joints, levers, or anything of the kind to get out of 
order, as such things do. Mills in use 8 to 12 years In 
good order now, that have never cost one cent for repairs. 
All genuine Enterprise Mills for the Pacific Coast trade 
come only through this agency, and none, whether of 
the old or latest pattern, are genuine exoept those bear- 
ing the "Enterprise Co." stamp. Look out for this as 
Inferior mills are being offered with testimonials applied 
to them which were given for ours. Prices to suit the 
times. Full particulars free. Beet Pumps, Feed Mills, 
etc., kept in stock. Address, 

HORTON & KENNEDY 

GENERAL OFFICE AND SUPPLIES (as always before), 
LIVERMORE, ALAMEDA CO.,' CAL. 

San Francisco Agency— JAMES LINFORTH 
116 Front St . San Francisco. 




REDUCED PRICES OF 

THE HALLADAY WIND-MILL 

WITHOUT TOWER: 

10-foot wheel $«S 00 

1'2-foot wheel Hi 00 

13-foot wheel 100 00 

t-i: - for circulars. 

AUSTIN BROS., Agents, 

Stockton, Cal. 

a 

•9 a 
i jj s 

» 9 

! 9 « 
s- * a 

S3 

as 

HORSK POWKKS, WINDMILLS, TANKS 
and all kinds of Pumping Machinery built to order 
AVSend for Catalogue and Price List. 

F. W. KROGH & CO., 

51 Be ale St., 8 an Francisco. 





OVER 5,000 IN USE ! 

Fully Guaranteed in every particular or no sale. Never 
had a rig returned. Do not i|iicstioii the merits of this 
machine, hut order at once of 

THOMAS POWELL, 

Patentee and Manufacturer, 

Stockton, Cal. 



30 DAYS' TRIAL. 




To Voting, old. rich or pi 



>th I 



-stop drugging, 
f Willi UK. 



and cure y 

HORNK'S (Sew Improved) 
Electric Belt. F.lectncityis 
Life, and a lncl of Ii is DIs- 
rase and Death Thousands 
testify to its priceless value. 

■ — _ — t sn.nou cures reported In 1883, 

Whole family can »i-ar same Belt. Cures without meal- 
cine. Pains In the Back, Hips, Head or Limbs, Nervous 
in liility. J.iimhago, General Debility, Rheumatism. Par- 
alysis, Neuralgia, Sviittlca. Disease of Kidneys, Spinal 

Blscascs, Torpid Liver, Gout, Asthma, Heart Dlm-aso, 
yspcpsls, Constipation, Kryslpulas, Indigestion. Rup- 
ture. Catarrh, Pllos, Epilepsy, Ague, Diabetes. 6end stamp 
lor Pamphlet. W. J. EOBNE, 70S Xtrilt St., 8st Frta- 
ciieo, C»l, Inventor, Proprietor and Manufacturer, 



WORTH'S PATENT HORSE POWERS. 

Price Fifty Dollars. 
First Prkiiiuhs Awabdbd at Sonoma Co. Fair, 1882-1883. 

Fanners, Dairymen, Mechanics and Business Menfhave 
long felt the want of a cheap and simple power to drive 
Farm, Dairy and other Machinery. In these Powers this 
want is fully supplied, and they are acknowledged by all 
who have used them to be the cheapest, best and simplest 
Powers made. Powers made for one to fourteen horses. 
I also manufacture all Iron Ensilage or Hay Cutters. 
Also. Worth's system of hea ting dairy milk-rooms by hot 
water. W. H. WORTH, 

Petaluma Foundry and Machine Works, Petaluma Cal. 



The Only Perfect Insect Eradicator 

CLIMAX SPRAY PUMP. 

F-r all kinds of Fruit Trees, Vines, Shrub', and all 
plants iu any way infested with inserts. A galvanized 
iron can. Capacity, 6 gallons; 6 feet best rubber hose. 
Brass pump with only metal valves that cannot he affe t- 
ed by chemica's, while the Climax Cyclone Spray Nozzle 
has no equal as a sprayer. 

I hi - Pump has been recommended as superior to all 
others by fr. F. Chapin, State Inspector of Fruit; C A. 
Wetmore, of the Viticultural Society; A. T. Hatch, of 
Sonoma; and over 800 others who have made a personal 
trial of and are using this Pump. For sale bv generil 
dealers in Hardware. Seedsmen, and at the ohl e of the 
CAL- FIRE APPARATUS MFG CO.. 
ai 1 & £13 California St.. San Francisco. 
JAS. S. NA1SMITH, Manager. 



AOCiVIXC* WANTED for DR. SCOTT'S 
All til I Obcauiilul Electric Corsets. >o;i 

nwaiii a wpi e j reul0l | n , si . uvcuimiiK ageuu. No 
rlsk.qutck sales. Territory glven.satUfactlonguarantejd 
Address DR. SCOTT, 842 Broadway St., N. Y. 



July 11, 1885.] 



pACIFie h^URAb p RESS. 



35 



3eed3, Wants, fee. 



LEONARD COATES. 



S. M. TOOL. 



NAPA VALLEY 

NURSERIES 

COATES & TOOL, Prop'rs. 

For Season of 1885-86 

We offer a splendid assortment of 

FRUIT TREES AND GENERAL 
NURSERY STOCK. 

OUR LEADING SPECIALTY WILL BE: 

THE 

"CENTENNIAL" CHERRY, 

A California Seedling of Napoleon Bigar- 
reau, fruited first in 1876, and now 
for the first time offered 
for sale. 

The "Centennial" Cherry resembles the Napoleon in 
color, but is nearly one-third larger, the seed is much 
smaller, and it is so firm that it will stind shipping to 
almost any part of the United States, it is known and 
recommended by all the leading hurt culturists who have 
seen it. A. T. Hatch, Esq., of Suisun, the well known 
fruit grower, and Vice-President of the California Horti- 
cultural Society, says, after seeing the fruit on the trees, 
and thoroughly testing it: "It far exceeds my highest 
expectations; it could not be better, and is all and more 
than you claim for it." Full particulars on application. 

ALSO 

500,000 ROOTED RESISTANT 
GRAPEVINE STOCKS 

AT LOW RATES. 



PR^EPARTURIENS walnut, 

In bearing in our Orchard at 3 years old. 

"Muir" Peach, Glaister Plum, Marshall's 
Seedling, or Red Bellflower Apple, 

And other noted fruits, etc. £3TSbnd for Catalogue. 

COATES & TOOL, 

Napa City, Cal. 

N. B. —A few good Agents wanted to can- 
vass for ua. C & T. 



ROSENDAHL'S NURSERY, 

Washington Co'ony, Fresno, Cal. 

200,000 Fruit Trees and Vines 

OF ALL KINDS. 

Particulars on application. Lowest rate' to the trade. 
Address C. P. WALTON. Sole Agent 

Box 5"o, Fresno, Cal. 




1,300 Engines now in use. 
40,000 Horse Power now running. 
Sales 2,000 H. P. per month. 

<arscnd for Illustrated Circu'ar and Reference List. 

PARKE & LACY, 

Sole Agents for Pacific Coast & Territories, 
21 and 23 Fremont St., San Francisco. 



SECOND HAND SEPARATOR 

For Sale at a Bargain. 

A 35-Inch Buffalo Pitts Separator 

With Jackson's Self- Feeder. 

Has been used about 60 days. Apply to 

H. HORTOP & CO., 

Rutherford, Napa Co., Cal. 

Or to D. N. & C. A. HAWLEY, No. 501 Market Street 
San Francisco. 



?eed$, Wants, ttc. peeds, Maptg, ttc. 




Washington Navel 

ORANGES 

AID 

EUREKA LEMONS. 



SEND FOR PRICES. 



IWill also contract to burl 
special varieties for future 
delivery in quantities to suit. 
Address : 
BYRON O. CLARK and 
RIGGINS BROS.. 
Box 88, Pasadena, Cal. 



You Want to Save Money and avoid a life of trouble, buy Trees Free from Scale. 



C5 



CO 
'a. 

CO 

sz 
O 

E_ 

a 

e 



W. M. WILLIAMS' 

SEMI-TROPICAL and GENERAL NURSERIES. 



375,000 TREES. 1,000,000 BOOTED VINES. 
FOR THE SEASON OF 1884-85. 



Apples, Pears, Peaches, Apricots, Nectarines, French and Hungarian Prunes, Plums, Figs 
and Cherries. Cypress, Gums, Acacias, Ornamental Shrubs, Greenhouse Plants. 

2,000 of the Genuine Smyrna Fig, imported from the Mediterranean, and proven in Cali- 
fornia this season. Sixty varieties of Grapes, roofed and cuttings, including all the best Wine 
and Raisin varieties. Catalogue free. 



P. O. BOX 175. 



\7V. TVL. WHjIiIAMS, 

Fresno, California. 



o to 
-1 3 

w 2 
X» a. 
•a 
=r 

</>' T| 
30 

m 
m 



Kieffers Hybrid, Le Conte and P. Barry Pears, at Reasonable Prices. 



SEEDS 



ALBERT DICKINSON 

DEALER IN 

Timothy, Clcer, Flax, Hungarian, Millet, Red (op. 
Blue Grace, Lawn Grass, Orchard Grass, Bird Seeds, *s 
POP CORN. 

WAREHOUSES: ,,_ „. . _^ 

MS, ti 7 & m 9 Kinzie St. ° fflCe - 115 K " UW S *°» 

to*. 106. 108 & 110 Michigan St CHICAOO. ILL. 



ALL ABOUT FIGS. 



THE WHITE ADRIATIC, 



SAN PEDRO, 



WHITE GENOA. 



itar Send for New Descriptive Circular. 
GUSTAV EISEN (PANCHBR CREEK NURSERY), 



FRESNO, CAL. 




S. W. Corner Kearny and Montgomery Avenue, San Francisco. 

Free Coach to and from thu House. J. W. BECKER, Proprietor. 



KELSEY HOUSE, 

OAKLAND, CAL. 

This large and well-kuown villa has been leased by C. C. Wheeler, of the Winsor. It has 
been thoroughly renovated th oughout. The House and Cottages are situated on large and 
beautiful grounds. The Billiard and Reading Rooms have been handsomely fitted up for ladieB 
and gentlemen. Jn close proximity is the Perry Seminary for young ladies, the Sackett School, 
the Misses Field's Home School for Young Ladies, California Military Academy, Hopkins' 
Academy, Pagoda Hill Kindergarten, and many other Schools. Cars pass the House every 
seven minutes from Broadway Station to State University. Ten minutes from Broadway and 
forty minutes from San Francisco. Special rates to regular boarders and families. Telephone 
communications to local points free. 

C. C. WHEELER, Proprietor. 



MONARCH CAW PRESS 

IOTONS BOX CAR 5&O0 

DNARCH Jiio..,»ARv «.,t 5 5i0O 

THE .,-flCH J— 

^O"* IS THE BEST SMA 
K BALECAR PRESS INTHFj 
WORLD. 




H- KT- COOK, 

No. 405 Market Street, corner Fremont, .... SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MANUFACTURER OF 

LEATHER BELTING and LACING. 

Short Lap, Oak-Tanned and Warranted. 

HEADER^ DRAPERS. 

My Drapers are made with strictest care and choicest material. They are the most durable in use 
Satisfaction Guaranteed. .Send for Catalogue, 



THE MONARCH 

— AND — 

JUNIOR MONARCH 



Hay Presses 



(Patented July 22nd, 1884.) 

NO TRAMPING REQUIRED ! 

Parties who think of buying Hay Presses the present 
reason, should not fail to send for circulars of the above 
machines, which are destined in a short time to super- 
sede all other baling machines. 

The first named, the MONARCH, is intended for 
making those small bales for loading box cars with ten 
tons. , It is the only Press made that will do this, w ithout 
crushing, grinding, or otherwise damaging the hay. Its 
bales are known in the San Francisco market as the 
three-quarter bales, and they bring from one to two dol- 
lars per ton more in that city than those bales which are 
tied endwise. The MONARCH is fed in large charges 
(two or more forkfuls) and the ba'es are pressed and tied 
sidewise, like the large common hales, which explains 
whv the hav is rot crushed or damaged. 

The JUNIOR MONARCH is just about the size 
of my Petaluma Hay Press, and makes a simi'ar bale, 
but it can be run by two men, and does its own tramp- 
ing, and is one-third faster than the Petaluma. The bales 
can be made 50 pounds heavier thar Petaluma bales. 

The wooden levers used last year are replaced with 
wrought-iron ones, and the action of the feed door has 
been greatly improved. 

A remarkable improvement, which is called 

THE IMPROVED AUTOMATIC HORSE POWER 

Has been applied to both the Monarch and the Junior 
Monarch presses this season (18S5). Heretofore the de- 
scent of the follower, after each charge, has been gov- 
erned by a brake on the horse-power operated by the 
driver Now, by means of a compact, solid little attach- 
ment, weighing but 40 pounds the descent of the fol- 
lower is controlled in the most perfect manner without 
the attention of anybody, thus saving the labor of one 
man. The action of this improvement (which though 
very simple, is not easily explained on paper,) is really 
very extraordinary. 
Price of Monarch. - $600 
Price of Junior Monarch, - - $500 
Genuine Price or Petaluma Presses made of clear, 
c ound White oak, and with Norway iron chains, at 
greatly reduced rates, and as low as the bogus affairs. 

Address : JACOB PRICE. San Leandro, Cal. 
Inventor of the Monarch, Junior Monarch, Petaluma, 
Wizard, Climax and Eagle Baling Presses. 



CAMPTON'S 




SELF-OPENING AND CLOSING 

AUTOMATIC GATE. 

For simplicity and durability it is the only reliable 
Gate now in use. No complex machinery about it. By 
a simple lever it is thrown (iff the center of gravity, and 
opens and closes- itself b,- its own weight A child six 
years old can 0|>en and close it sitting in a bugsy. 

It is tiik Gatk when driving a skittish horse or young 
colt, or when ladies do their own driving. No Fancy 
Residence should be without the m, and every Farmer 
should have them where there is a Gate used. He will 
save time, besides taking the chances of his team leaving 
him while closing the old common Gate. 

These Gates are almost as cheap as any common Farm 
Gate. They are durable, never get out of order, and will 
last a lifetime. 

Send for Circular giving references and Prii"e List. 
Address JOHN AYLWARD. 

P. O. Box 88. Livermore, Alameda Co., Cal. 

Or JAMES STANLEY, Mission San Jose, Cal. 

County Rights for sale, apply to John Avi.ward. 

EXCELSIOR FRUIT FITTER 



PITTING 

PLUMS, 
APRICOTS, 

NECTARINES, 

Etc , Etc. 

t9~ Send for Circii,ak 
and Prices. 




WIESTER & CO., 

17 New Montgomery St., 
San Francisco, CM; 



COMMERCIAL HOTEL, 

A. & J. HAHN, Prop'rs, 

Nob. 278, 275 , 277 and 279 Main Street, Stockton, Cal. 
Kates, $1.85 to $2 Per Day. 
Stage offices for Collcgeville and Oakdale, Roberts and 
Union Islands, and Lane's Mineral Springs stages. The 
most desirable location in the city. Refurnished and refit 
ted in the best style for the accommodation of the public. 
Free coach from all trains and steamboats to the hotel. 



f> ACIFI6 RURALo p>RESS. 



[Jdly 11, 1885 




"NEW HOME" 

Leads all Others in Sales and Popularity. 

GIVES LESS TROUBLE. IS MORE SATISFYING. 

THE MOST ATTRACTIVE FOR DEALERS TO HANDLE. 

The New Home Sewing Machine Co., 

Nos. 108 and 110 POST STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



GEO. H. ROOT, 

Manager 
PACIFIC COAST. 



M 

1-3 



best 


btano, 


□ act 

oesi 


Feed, 


Best 


Shuttle, 


Best 


Attachments, 


Best 


Woodwork, 


Best 


Wearing. 



PAT'D. MAY 3"? 16 81 



Okar Sir : — 1 1 a v i n g M many inquiries ahout print ol 
liates and County Rights, etc, 1 herewith giie prices of 
this celebrated Gate: 

For a Wood Frame Cafe, Wire Hod $25 0) 

For a Wood Frame (iatc, Wire Rod, Ho;; and Itah- 

bit tight 30 00 

For a Wrought Iron Plain date 40 00 

Frr a Wrought Iron Plain Ciatc, Hon and Rabbit 

tight 45 00 

For a Wrought Iron Plain Gate with fan vv scroll 

on top 45 00 

For a Wrought Iron Frame, tilled with .Marsh Wire GO on 
For a Wrought Iron Frame, rilled w ith Marsh Wire. 

with fancy sc roll on top 60 00 

For a Tubular Iron Plain Gate 35 00 

For a Tabular Iron Plain Gate, Hog and Rabbit tight in M 
For a Tubular Iron Plain Gate with fancy scroll ou 

top 45 00 

For a Tubular Iron Frame tilled with Marsh Wire, 

with fancy scroll on tup $W 00 to 60 00 

For Very Fancy Iron Gates from $60 On to 100 00 

In asking for prices of OOUntV Rights, and discount to 
agents, etc., it is hard to make am fair impression on any 
person who has never seen the article 'hey arc inquiring 
ahout. Keen if I quoted the largest discount given by 
any firm, or if I quoted the price of County Rights to you 
almost for nothing, yet any business man would not buy 
or handle any article before view ing it, and ascertain 
what it was. 

The question would naturally follow, "Will if pay to 
canvass for this; if it does, will it pay better to buy the 
territory in which he wishes to canvass in':" Those are 
questions any business man will ask himt-elf before he 
embarks into any enterprise of this ki"d. And to place 
you on a fair basis, I will ship J ou a gate $">.00 less than 
the prices quoted. You pot it up according to our direc- 
tions, and if the gate don't give satisfaction, send it back, 
freight paid, a d I will refund you the money, or you can 
deposit v ith Wells. Fargo & Co. a express agent the price 
of the gate, less the 85.00, subject tomv order in ten days 
after receiving the gate. This will give you ample time 
to test the gate and sec what it is. Should you return 
the gate, upon presenting the shipping receipt, freight 
paid, you can draw the amount from the agent with 
whom you deposited the money. I make this proposition 
because I know the gate will give the best of satisfaction, 
anil 1 can show you figures whe f eby you can make more 
money on the sale of this gate every . vua r fo'flfteen years, 
than you can on the host 160 acres of land in your county. 
If you have any desire to enter into this business and bu\ 
County Rights, and thoroughly canvass. I w ill send you 
a confidential circular gi\ ing the bed-rock figures of the 
cost of these gates, which will show yon the large profit 
there is in them, and as to the sale of the gate, they are 
easily sold, more especially where they are in'roduced for 
an> length of time, there is where they sell the fastest. 

For further particulars Inquire of vourd truly, 

JOHN AYLWARD, 
P. O. Box 88, Livermore, Alameda Co., Cal. 

fysee mj nth' r advertisement in this paper. 




E.B. PRESTON &C0/S 

Pure Oak-Tanned, 
Short Lap 

Leather Belting. 

•ACORN" BRAND. 

BEST IN THE WORLD 
JSTWrite for discounts. 

STEARNS M'F'G CO., 

Saw-Mill Machinery Builders, 

29 & 31 Spear St . San Francisco. 

For the BEST HONEY EXTRACTOR 

... .OR ... . 

BEST WAX EXTRACTOR, 
Or Supplies for the Apiary, 

SUM) TO 

J. D. ENAS, ... Napa. Cal. 

AND HaVK TIMR AMI l-KKIOHT. 

OLIVES! OLIVES! 

1 wbt'a either 1<- ijf in <* ith »<»uc one. or f»rm a cum- 
ptt»y to I'lant Olives exteo&ive]] . 

I ha\o man\ thousand line two yetr-oM ti res. 

W. A HAYNE. JR., 

RantH Barbsra. ChI 



TO WINE-MAKERS. 



A RAKK OPPoRTI Nin t" purchase 160 to 200 tons 
of the finest Grapes, with the pi ivile re of munufa' tic ing 
them into wine on the premises; re'lar and other facili- 
ties given. Very little outlay to make w ine. 
ffVot particulars address 

X., care CHAS. RHINE. 
Clayton, Contra Costa Co., Cal 



"ACME" 

DOUBLE* 1 



PULVERIZING HARROW, 
'Clod Crusher, 
and Leveler. 




The "ACHE" subjects the 3 lil tu Ihe action of a Stenl Crusher an I l.evider, and to the Catting, 
Lifting, Turning; process of double ganjt of C.»sr STEEL COULTKKS, the peculiar shape and arrange- 
meat of whioh give Immense catling power. Thus the three operations of crushing lumps, levelling 
off t ;<■ ground and thoroughly |> n 1 \ cii/ing the S"il are performed at the MOM time). The entire ab- 
sence of SplkM or Spring Teeth avoids pulling up rubbish. It is especially adapted to inverted sod and 
hard clay, where other liar raws utterly fail; vorks perfectly 00 light soil, and is the only Harrow that elite over 
the entire surface ot t he ground. We make n variety of sizes, :s to 1 ;> feet Wide. 

The "ACME" is in practical use in ncirly every Agricultural Oonutv on the Pacific Coast, and has proved itself 
to b< lint the tool fOI use in V I \ I ) \ A K l>S, OK< II AUDS. ami UK A IN KIKhllS. 

«rSend for Pamphlet, containing Thousands of Testimonials from 48 different States 

and Territories. 

INT ^ SHI cfc BROTHER, 

Manufactory and Principal Office, Millington, N J. 



N. li 



-Pi 



nphle 



ril.l.M.K IS MA. VI RE, wo Otiirr Kss vvs," sent free In parties who name this pa| cr. 

Koli SALE ON THE PACIFIC COAST HV 

Geo. Bull & Co , ai and 23 Main St.. San Francisco; G. B Adams & Son. Pan Gabriel 
Cal.; Staver & Walker, Portland, Or, and Walla Walla, W. T. 



MERY'S IMPROVED PIONEER 




BARLEY CRUSHER 



STILL AT THE FRONT! 



: -:Mlii^3^m^^^^^\ 

This Mill has been In use on thiB Coast for 6 years, 

TAKEN THE PREMIUM AT THE STATE FAIR 

Four years in succession, and has met, with general favor, 
there now- being 

OVER 175 OF THEM IN USE IN CALIFORNIA! 

It is 1 1 ... most ecoi deal and durable Feed Mill in use. I am tule menu- 

faeturer ol the Corrugated Roller Mill. The Mi Is are all read) to mount 

on wagons. 

I thank the public for the knel ueXrODage received thus far, and hope fur a continual!' c of the same. 

3VI. Xji. mery, CHICO IRON WORKS, Ohico. o«i. 




QUEEN LILY SOAP 

MAKI KACTI RBIi BV TI1R 

NEW ENGLAND SOAP CO. 



The t^ne* n IM\ Snap was the first and is the only Soap that waslu-s 
without robbing- Kroiu our lonti i'\pci ieinv, and with imrroved DM 
il-hieM, tr.c %teat rcdmti< n in material and labor, we arc nowftota to 
offer this hran l at a ureath reduced gfffC*, and in quality and finish. 
\:iMh Miperioi tn any heietofore nianutaftured hy us. In u-inu the 
Quota Lily Soap, it is ImpOMlble to Imil the dirt in, it i.-m K it 
out. The tlue-t Linens. Vn >2brioi and Iaiyh washed with this Sjoajt, 
(tome from the w*ish, sweet, pure and uninjured. 
/ST ASK VOUtl QttOCER FOB IT. 

FISCHBECK & GLOOTZ, 

Omen— iil4 Sacramento Street, 
Factor* Sixteenth and Utah Sts., San Francisco. 



CHICAGO VETERINARY COLLEGE, 

Incoi-poratcd 1883. 

nniial aim .... ul and further information apply to the Secretary, 79 to SO Twelfth Street. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



PACIFIC MACHINERY DEPOT. 

H.P. GREGORY & CO.. 

2 & 4 California St., San Francisco, 

Importers ami Dealers in all kinds of 

MACHINEEY. 

ENGINES AND BOILERS 

On Iland from i to ion II. P. 
Thicsliing Engines. 
Pumps of all kinds, from the 

ORCHARD SPRAYING PUMPS 

To the Largest Class of 

IRRIGATING PUMPS. 

Saw-Mills, Wood and Iron Work- 
ing Machinery. 

THE EQUITABLE GAS MACHINE. 

Something thai even farmer onght t" ha\c in his 
house. Cheaper than Kerosene or Candles. Safe, 
Simple, anil Kfticlriit. 

43TSRND for Dbkcrmtivr Tatauoi r. 

IMPROVED HAY PRESSES. 




Bale Ten Tons of Hay a Day. 
Ten Tons to the Car. 

Audrrhh : 

GEO. ERTEL & CO., 

Quincy. Ills.. U S. A. 

N B. Any horse power hay press, whatever ite 0MM 
may he. is in\ ited to be worked afrainst an Ertel press, 
tor an amount of from 3500 to #1,000 a side, the press do- 
ing the most work (10 tons to the car) with thr 'east 
expense to take the mODST.— O. K \ ■ 



INDIANAPOLIS 

CHAIR MANUFACTURING CO. 



This old and reliable firm Is now located at theli 
New Building, 
Number 750 MlHglon Street, San Franclaco 

This immense structure is 60x100 feet, four stories and 
basement The first and second storiee are used as sale- 
rooms for a new and select class of goods of latest designs 
and patterns. Parties wishing to furnish a house will save 
from 16 to 25 per cenl by purchasing their goods here 



$2,000 BURNS 

HOT-AIR FRUIT EVAPORATOR 

Of Four Sections, 
With iiodiI huildii g 20x40 aod two town lots in city o 
Fresno. Mu-t In sold. Fow in the time to bin. an the 
Pratt Bwejon is cointnencing. One half interest for 
•1,030. Al plj to 

FRESNO LAND OFFICE, 
W. P. HABER, Manager. Fresno, Cal. 

GRIND YOUR OWN BONE, 

Heal, OyMer Shell* A I urn in the 

<t7 HAND MILL 

«4/l (F. Wilson's Patent.) HKI 
l»erct. more made in keepug I'oultry. Also Powrr 
^lilN and Farm Feed .IlilM. rircularH and testi- 
monials eent on application. U'll.sON BKOS. 
KASTON, Penna. The l'acitic Coast supplied hy 
HAWLEY BROS. HARDWARE CO., 

poi toSOUJlARKIiT HU Sun Krmirisco. ( al, 

FARMERS, ATTENTION ! 

VSK ONLY 



Will & Finck's Hand-Forged and Hand- 

SPRING-EYE NEEDLES. 

Beet In the World. Ask your dealer for 






TWEWTY PAGE EDITION, 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 18, 1885. 



Vol. XXX— No. 3.] 



The Poison Oak. 

[Written for BuRAL Press by W. A. P.] 

It is with sad recollections that many of our 

city cousins recall the days they spent in the 

country — 

"When bricks have grown hot and 

When sunstrokes by dozens. 

Fill body with anguish and bosom with fear." 

Many of them now consider it a rash mo- 
ment when they " 'Scaped from turmoil to quiet 
and calm," to enjoy "the rich creamy milk 
which their ready hand seizes from their 
brown country cousins who live on the 
farm." What joyous times those dear city 
cousins tried to have on the farm, with- 
out spending a dime. They expected — 

"To live on rich cream and ripe berries, 
Fresh, golden-hued butter, and cakes light and 
warm, 

Froe use of horses, the carts and the wherries," 
To be gladly supplied them by their "uncul- 
tured cousins" of the farm. The trouble they 
cause or the damage they commit never gives 
them a moment's thought. 

Ah, but what a treasure the "sweet country 
cousins" have when those dainty-handed city 
cousins begin to become obnoxious and their 
visit at last becomes unbearable, which we are 
sorry to say is too often the case, as their 
haughty, unruly ways plainly show. 

Yes, the "green-waving fields" and the 
shady brook close by have a balm about them 
which are to the sorely- worried cousins of the 
farm a friend indeed. No wonder it is with 
sad recollections that the sweet cousins from 
the city rue the day they molested their rustic 
kinsfolk. Too well do they remember when the 
good mother of their "brown- visaued cousins" 
suggested tnat they "go a-blackberrying." 
Through the briars and woods they ramble in 
quest of the black fruit, regardless of the con- 
sequences to clothes or person. With fun in 
their eyes the "uncultured cousins" lead them 
to where the poison oak grows rankest and its 
nutlets whitest. They scramble about the 
poisonous undergrowth, climb upon it, tear it 
aside, all in their endeavor to fill their cans 
with berries. The next few days show the con- 
sequences. Their own parents would hr.rdly be 
able to recognize them, so swollen are their 
heads and limbs. Their sufferings are intense, 
and they feel like scratching themselves to 
pieces. Their complaints arc annoying, and to 
their people in the city they are sent for treat 
ment, as they show no respect to the people 
with whom they are staying. 

But we are happy to state that but few folks, 
relatives and otherwise, are like those described 
above. By their behaving themselves properly 
and paying that respect to the farmer and his 
belongings which they deserve, we are sure 
they will be well treated even if they should 
be so unfortunate as to be alllicted with poison 
oak poisoning. Persons who visit their friends, 
or make a stay in the country, are not the only 
ones poisoned, but also those who attend pic- 
nics where may chance to grow the plant in 
question. 

To sonic persons, especially those of light 
complexion, the poison of this plant is very in- 
jurious, and cases are reported where it has 
proven fatal. Still, by proper care and the ap- 
plication of some of the many remedies now 
recommended, danger may be avoided, though 
considerable suffering may be experienced. 

On this page is a good engraving of a twig of 
poison oak, It may be news to some that this 



hated plant is sought by the toilers of the 
hive. 

" In the nice bee, what sense so subtly true, 
From poisonous herbs extracts the healing dew." 

Thus wrote the poet Pope, and here in Cali- 
fornia do we find these little insects working on 
plants that are known to be deadly poisons. 



I 



1 



From poison oak we find the bees industriously 
gathering nectar during the months of March 
and April. The honey is said to be very fine 
and of a pleasant flavor. We have found it to 
be as excellent as any gathered in Alameda 
county. On the creeks and hillsides nearly all 
through the State the poison oak is to be found 
growing. The poisonous variety is known as 
Jlhim dirersilobu, and has striped, whitish nut- 
lets. Another variety with red nutlets and not 
poisonous is known as 11. Irilobata. 

[If this sketch has irritating features, let them 
be attributed to the character of the subject 
and the hot weather. — Ens. PkehsJ 



The Fruit-Growers Meeting at Sacra- 
mento. — The fruit-growers meeting was held at 
Grangers' Hall, Sacramento, according to an- 
nouncement, on July 11th, the object being to 
insure a better and more stable market for the 
product of the orchard and vineyard. Asa 
Low was elected Chairman and E. Greer Secre- 



{ $3 a Year, In Advance 

1 ,Sin(ile Copies, 10 Cts. 



be kept up to a paying point is that large pro- 
ducers shall ship their products to the East, 
leaving the home market for the small pro- 
ducer. We expect to have a fuller report of 
the meeting hereafter. 

The Signal Service. 




THE POISON OAK -Rhus Diversiloba. 



tary. A committee appointed at a previous 
meeting, composed of Dr. J. A. llughson, J. 
Koutier, A. Burns, I). F. Luikius, J. Murphy 
and E. Greer, and who were instructed to formu- 
late some plan of organization, reported a reso- 
lution favoring the establishment of a fruit 
depot, to do a general fruit-dealing business, 
and to have connected therewith a canning and 
drying establishment. The Chairman invited 
discussion of the resolution. Addresses were 
made at considerable length by J. B. W r elty, E. 
F. Aitkeu, A. 15. Burns, Senator Koutier, David 
Lubin and others. The general opinion seemed 
to be that the only way in which prices could 



We have already announced the opening in 
this city of a local branch of the United States 
Signal Service, under the direction of Lieuten- 
ant Craig, who occupied an important position 
in the Washington office for a number of years. 
We had a call from Lieutenant Craig the other 
day, and learned that he had been fully occu- 
pied since arrival in laying his plans for effective 
work in the interest of the commercial and pro- 
ducing industries of the coast. He finds the 
field out here somewhat peculiar, because of the 
novel anddiverse conditions prevailing, and feels 
the need of all the aid he can obtain from local 
observers Concerningjimportant phenomena. He 
would be p'eased to have copies of all carefully 
kept records of rainfall from observers every 
where. He has the records cf the Signal Ser- 
vice stations, of course, and those kept by the 
rulway men at the stations along their lines. 
He would like to supplement these by records 
at points away from such stations, and he de- 
sires, besides the figures, all notes of the occur- 
rence of peculiar phenomena, violent winds, 
unseasonable frosts, etc., etc. We know there 
are many amateur observers who have been 
keeping records for years for their own pleasuro 
or the public interest, and they i>o doubt con- 
tain much data which could be used to advan- 
tage by Lieutenant Craig in his work. 

Aside from these observations, Lieut. Craig 
would like to know at what seasons any classes 
of producers would like special warning of phe- 
nomena likely to injure them. He desires to 
serve the dried fruit and raisin interest by a 
few hours notice of coming rain, but to do this 
intelligently he should know about what timo 
such a notice would be valuable in different re- 
gions. Also concerning the appearance of un- 
timely frosts, and in fact whenever anything is 
exposed which is liable to weather injuries, 
which might be obviated by a notice before- 
hand which would give time for protection. 

Lieut. Craig does not hope to give faultless 
information at first. It would probably be im- 
possible to reach such a high percentage of ac- 
curacy here, where conditions are so little 
known, as at the East, where years of work 
have enabled the Service to proceed with a full 
knowledge of conditions and to render most 
valuable aid to the industries. On the other 
hand, there is every reason to expect to do ac- 
curate and valuable work when the proper data 
shall be at hand. Lieut. Craig certainly de- 
sires that his work shall prove of the highest 
value to the people, and all should aid him by 
giving whatever information on the subject they 
have gained from their own experience and ob- 
servation. Lieut. Craig may be addressed at 
room 40, :102 Montgomery street, S. F. 

Is accordance with the recent Act of the 
Illinois Legislature, the Governor has issued a 
proclamation, recalling all existing orders 
against the importation of cattle into that State 
from certain localities, suspected of containing 
pleuro-pucumouia. 

Bi.ackukkries and other small fruit, near 
Mount Tabor, Or., have been shriveled by the 
intense heat. 



38 



fACIFie RURAb fRESS. 



[July 18, 1885 



C[o r^ES PO N D EJM © E. 



Correspondents arc alone responsible for their opinions. 

To Oregon by Wagon— No. 2. 

EDITORS PbXSS: Since writing mylast letter 
we have met Eome parties who were traveling 
from ( 'aliforuia to this State anil camped about 
two miles back of us at Mount Shasta, and they 
say the snow fell about IS inches dsep the d y 
that we were caught in the snow storm spoken 
of in our last letter. We congratulated our- 
selves on our narrow escape, as snow storms in 
the month of June are a new thing in our ex- 
perience. 

About 20 miles from Mouut Shasta we came 
to Sheep Rock. Before reaching that .point, we 
expected to see a rock about the size, and per- 
haps the shape, of a sheep, with horns, wool, 
etc. But imagine our surprise when we came 
in view of that "bit of rock" — it was an immense 
mountain, and loomed up grand and imposing 
before ue. Surely it ought to have a more dig- 
nified name. The doctor said he would like to 
stay there a week just to have a good look at it. 
If any of your readers wish to have a look at it 
we suppose it will be there on exhibition free 
for some time yet. 

Leaving Sheep Kick, after having fed our 
horses some oats and rye grass, and having also 
dried ourselves otT in the sun, which now came 
out, we proceeded on our journey through the 
Shasta valley. Reaching Little Shasta, we 
mailed some letters for home. Little Shasta is 
a beautiful valley in the mountain; the tields 
were all green with growing grain, alfalfa and 
meadow grass. The place looked lovely to us, 
but we have been told since that they have 
some ague even in this mountain valley. 

From here we proceeded over a Lilly country 
and down on to the Klamath river. We camped 
at the stage station three miles above the ferry, 
having traveled during the day -Mi miles, with a 
cold wind in our faces all day. 

June 10th we left the station at (i o'clock, 
crossed the ferry and came down the river to 
Cottonwood. There is a small tow n here rather 
dull-looking now, but there are evidences of 
considerable mining having been done at this 
place. Leaving Cottonwood, we followed up a 
creek and soon began to climb the Siskiyou 
mountains: a climb which we estimated to be 
two miles in extent. Near the summit of 
the mountain we came in sight of the un 
finished railroad tunnel. Here we noticed 
many rare and beautiful wild flowers, 
gathered some and pressed them in our 
book. Before we reached the mountain 
we had a lively time with a hare which the doc- 
tor shot for our supper. He onlv broke Mr. 
Hare's leg, and could not catch him until Old 
Tip joined in the chase, and all had a lively 
time after this Siskiyou hare. We forgot to 
mention the doctor has cleaned the gun out, and 
kills nearly every time now. We saw plenty 
of deer tracks in the road, but saw no deer. 
On the summit we found very fine grass for our 
horses, and turned them loose for an hour. 
After lunch we drove down this long mountain 
grade, at the foot of which we struck Kogue 
River valley and arrived at Ashland in the mid- 
dle of the afternoon. Here we received letters 
from home, and also from friends in Oregon. 

We ran out of potatoes at Mt. Shasta — could 
not get any at the store in Little Shasta, nor at 
the stage stition on the Klamath river. Thought 
we would try our luck in Ashland, but we in- 
quired at five stores before we found any for 
sale, and then bought all the man had for 25 
cents. How is that for this celebrated potato 
country ! It is hard work to write letters in 
camp without a chair or table, so I will close 
for this time. I. E. Davis. 

Hoy n<> River Valley, June 28th, 



The Fourth on a Mountain Top. 

EDITORS I'kesn:— It is just possible that the 
great outside world will care lit le how the deni- 
zens of the Santa Cruz moun'ains spent the 
fourth of July, but since novelty alwayB has a 
little spice in it, we venture to report the out- 
come of a new departure in this line. 

The idea originated with C. J. Caile that 
patriotism and pleasure might be happily 
blended. In accordance with this idea, he pro- 
posed that our entire neighborhood, man, wo- 
man and child, should make an excursion to the 
summit, thence northward along the same, until 
a suitable camping place should be found, and 
remain until the next day. Accordingly, every- 
thing being arranged on the evening of the 
3d, wagons and carriages were in readi 
ness by six o'jlock on the morning of the 
Fourth, into which were first stowed baskets, 
boxes, and wonderful looking hampers of won- 
derfully good things to eat; then bundles of 
blankets and other camp equipage, and lastly, 
the household, not forgetting the baby, stowed 
themselves in, on and against the vehicles. 
Some were provided with saddle horses. The 
morning .vas clorious, as is every morning in 
this region. The march was slow for about an 
hour, until the summit was reached, along 
which a road extends about on the line 
separating the counties of Santa Clara and 
Santa Cruz. Then the pace is quickened, 
with an occasional pause to enjoy the 
magnificent scenery around us. On the east al- 



most at our feet, lies the Santa Clara valley, 
looking more like a magnificent garden on a 
grand scale than any thing else of which we can 
think; San Jose and Santa Clara embowered in 
their dark green forests as seen from our posi 
tion, and the towns and villages dotting the 
broad expanse like gems in a diadem. On the 
west are the undulations of the redwood forests 
extending down to Monterey Bay on the south- 
west, and to the Pacific on the west and north- 
west. We drive through grand old groves of 
oak and fir under which roam herds of fine 
cattle cropping the grass which is yet green and 
fresh. At about !t o'clock we halt at Castle 
Rock a wonder in itself. A huge, almost iso- 
late'!, soft sandstone rock, perhaps 50 feet high, 
sitting on the ridge like a reposing sentinel. 
Some of our party scaled its summit— a feat of 
some diiliculty. 

Fortunately, we had several fine field glasses 
which added not a little to the pleasure of the 
party. At this place we took lunch in a beau- 
tiful grove, honored, perhaps for the first time, 
by a company of patriotic pleasure-seekers. 

We resume our march and another half hour 
brings us to Summit Rick. Eureka! Here we 
pitch our camp. Teams are unharnessed and 
cared for. Arrangements are made for the com- 
fort of the whole party, embracing more than 
50 persons, to rein.'.iu until next day. Summit 
Rock is a bold promontory overlooking Santa 
Clara valley, about opposite Mountain 
View. It is but tame to say that the view from 
here is so bewildcringly beautiful that one does 
not care to talk while beholding. The bay and 
the villages beyond, with Mt. Diablo as the 
background on the east, a glimpse of San Fran- 
cisco and sister cities on the north , the farms, 
roads, cities and towns of the valley, all form- 
ing a real picture that rivals the word pictures 
of the Arabian tales. After feasting the eye 
awhile we gather into camp to have our cele- 
bration. "The Star Spangled Banner" was ren- 
dered artistically by Mrs. Frauk B. liaker, fol- 
lowed by the reading of the "Declaration" by 
Mrs. S L. Kidney. Patriotic addresses were 
made by J. J. Beggs and others, after which 
recitations and songs were rendered by the 
young people. 

No pomp of artillery and martial music in 
the streets of crowded cities ever warmed the 
patriotic heart more thoroughly than this aim 
pie but earnest celebration. A bountiful dinner 
was spread, and we need hardly say that it re- 
ceived the special attention of all concerned. 
A roaring bonfire was now made, around which 
all gathered, and a couple of hours spent 
in song singing and merry-making. We then 
retired to our couches by family groups — the 
star specked sky our roof, and the soft sighing 
of the wind our lullaby. Many of the com- 
pany here spent their first night in the open 
air. At dawn, the camp was all life again. 
Another view from Summit's Rock in the rising 
sun, a warm breakfast, and the return home. 

The party embraced the fallowing persons 
and their families: C. J. Carle, J. K. Chitten- 
den, J. J. Beggs, W. B. Fieldine, J. Newell, 
F. H. Baker, F. Stolte, aud Mrs. R.udell. Also 
Messrs. Ford, N. McKee, Jesse Gibe, of San 
Francisco, Mr. and Mrs. Kingston, of San Jose, 
and Miss Julia Wilmot, of Alameda. At the 
summit they were joined by others, among 
whom were Mr. and Mrs. Herring and Mr. aud 
Mrs. Templeton. 

We cannot say less than this to the weary 
ones of town: If you would live out your al- 
lotted days, if you would renew the vigor of 
your youth, if you would be happy, in orderthat 
you may be virtuous, go aud do likewise. 

One of Them. 

Hazel If ill Ranrh, Lo" dittos. 



the Holland herd book, Vol. 8, as No. 3,300, 
and in American Holstein record No. 813. 

His pedigree dates back to Rooker, the 
fountain head of the great milkers of the Aaggie 
family, and is direct. Saratoga was sired by 
Jacob Wit 4th; he by Jacob 2d; he by Jacob 
1st; he by Rooker, out of De Ooede, a ptize 
cow at the Paris Exposition, with a milk record 
of 91 pounds 8 ounces in one day. S ira toga's 
dam is De Ruiter's Bona, granddam Cornelia, 
great granddam Porcelain, out of Cude, Porce- 
Icin by Rooker. Cornelia was a prize cow, and 
Porcelaiu had a milk record of 80 pounds in 
one day. 

The heifer, Black l^ueen, is recorded in the 
Holland herd book, Vol. S, as No. 6,854; was 
calved April 2, 18S3, and imported by Messrs. 
Powell it Smiths May, 1SS4. It is mostly black, 
except the legs, which are white from the knees 
down. She was sired by Van dor Meer's bull, 
who took the first prize in the distric .against 
GO competitors. Her dam was Jantje, with a 
record as a four-year old of 73 pounds of milk 
a day. Her granddam has a record of 77 
pounds a day. Both these animals are now at 
the owner's ranch, near Shaw's Hot Springs. 
The object of bringing them to this State was 
partly tor speculative purposes, and to assist in 
the impetus now being given the breeding of 
thoroughbreds by cattlemen of Nevada, who 
are settling down to the proposition that the 
best pays beyond a question. 

In connection with the purchase of these cat- 
tle from Powell & Smiths, of Syracuse, New 
York, we desire to speak in the highest terms 
of the business methods of the firm. Their 
stock is better than they represent, aud in 
carrying out the contract with the writer they 
were obliged to pay extra freight bills from 
Reno to Los Angeles and return, as the rail- 
road company refused to put them oil' at Etooo. 
These extra bills they paid out of their own 
pocket, and in rectifying a mistake made by 
them in selling a bull already selected, they 
supplied the deficiency with a higher-priced bull 
at the same figures. Parties dealing with this 
firm will be certain of the fairest treatment. 



JI]hE giTOGK ^ARD. 



Holsteins on the Pacific Coast. 

During the last year the Holsteins have made 
a notable advance on this coast. K. A. Row- 
ell, of Smiths, Powell k Lamb, Syracuse, and 
Mr. Powell, of Shadeland, Springboro, Pa., 
made us a call the other day. Both gentlemen 
are prominent in live stock circles at the Fist, 
and seem to be pleased with what they saw of 
California resources and the enterprise ol the 
people. 

Mr. E. A. Powell told us that his firm had 
sent three carloads of Holsteins to California 
during last few months, and had other orders 
besides. The herds of Mr. (Jndeihill, ofSinta 
Barbara, Mr. Meek, of Sin Lorenzo, and a car 
load owned by Senator Stanford are from the 
Lakeside herd at Syracuse, N. Y. 

While here Mr. Powell served as a committee 
of the Holstein Breeders' Association, to ex- 
amine the pedigrees aud cattle sent here last 
winter to Henry Fierce, and would report them 
for registry. We understand that lot has gone 
into growers' hands. Besides these, Mr. W. 
Niles, of Los Angeles, has been doing a business 
in 1 1 ul at- ins. Thus it may be shown that the 
breed has scored an advance in this State dur- 
ing the year. 

Among the sales by Smiths, Powell & Lamb 
were a bull and heifer to Sam Davis, editor of 
the Carson Appeal, Nevada. The esteem in 
which the cattle and the firm selling them are 
held in Nevada may be learned bv the following 
which we quote from the Reno Journal of re- 
cent date : 

The bull is named "Saratoga." Hewascalved 
in Holland March 23d, 1884, and is recorded in 



An Ayrshire Record. 

Our California Ayrshire breeder, (leorge Be 
mcnt, of Redwood City, has kept records of his 
cows for several years. We published a num- 
ber of them a year ago and expect to have an- 
other report soon. Tne Ayrshire Breeders' As- 
sociation of the Fist is making the collection 
of accurate records of specified milkings a 
feature of their publications. A qualified per- 
son is appointed by the association to super- 
vise the test and a prize is offered for the best 
one week record. The last we have seen is the 
account of the test of the Ayrshire cow "Duch- 
ess of Bmithfield" 4,256, the property of H. R. 
C. Watson, Bsq., West Farms, New York, and 
entered for the special seven-day milk prize for 
1885. The following is an extract from the ex- 
pert's report: 

In accordance with the conditions of the test, 
I saw the cow milked perfectly dry at 5 p. H., 
Sunday, May 31, 1885, or 12 hours before the 
commencement of the test. 

Owing to the immense milk yield of this cow, 
it was deemed advisable to have her milked 
three times a day, and this was accordingly 
done at the following hours: Namely, 5 A. M., 
1 p. m. and 9 p. m. 

The first milking included iu the test was 
that of Monday, June 1, 1885, at 5 a. m., and 
the latt that of Sunday, June 7, 1885, at 5 p. m., 
making the duration of the test within the 
seven days as required. The test resulted in a 
total yield for the seven days of 463j pounds. 

During the day the cow was out on ordinary 
pasture of timothy and clover mixed, and at 
night was turned into the yard and given as 
I much cut grass as she would eat. 

The "Duchess of Smithtield," 4,256, was 
born December 20, 1876. She is by Lion Doug 
las, 1,261, out of "Hester 2d," 2498, and is a 
splendid representative of the renowned "Doug- 
las" family from the imported cow "Corslet." 
Her color is a deep, rich red and white about 
evenly distributed. She has a beautiful head, 
neck of medium length, chest broad and deep, 
forequarters light, body large and especially 
deep at the flanks, has a very capacious and sys 
tematically formed udder, measuring 68 inches 
round, broad at the rear, and extending well 
forward, with teats of good size, and about 
equal distance apart; the milk veins about the 
udder and abdomen are wonderfully well devel- 
oped, and she has a magnificent Flandrine es 
cutcheon: her skin is soft and elastic to tin- 
touch, and ib covered with fine, glossy hair; her 
style and movement extremely graceful, and her 
disposition and temperament, as far as I was 
able to judge, perfect. 

She has apparently a very strong constitu 
tion and is a remarkably good feeder. Her 
weight on the day before the test began was 
1,128 pounds. Her last calf was born March 
20, 18S5, or about two and a half mouths before 
the commencement of the test. She is a very 
persistent as well as a deep milker, and in all 
her points and characteristics exhibits an ex- 
ceedingly close conformity to the perfect type 
of the Ayrshire cow. 

Her milk for the same seven days made 19 
pounds 6 ounces of butter, so she has an ofli 
cial seven-days milk test of 46 'U pounds, and a 
butter record of 19 pounds and 6 ounces. Duchess 
of Smithtield has given in one year on moder . 
ate feed, without forcing, 9,2 16 pounds of milk. ' 



bTURAIs jSeiENQE. 

Decay of Organic Bodies. 

We have been speaking of the products of 
decay without fully explaining the different de- 
gree* of decay with reference to the product 
formed. There are in the organic world throe 
modification or .degrees of decay: (1) Slow 
decay, or • n ma caHSM, as scientists call it; (2) 
fermentation; (3) putrefaction. 

Slow decay, or crema causis, requires the 
constant presence of free oxygen; it is simply 
slow oxidation. Vegetable matter, consisting 
largely of cellulose, is constantly undergoing 
this process of decay. It effects, principally, 
the more' stable forms of organic matter. With 
vegetable matter the product is vegetable, mold 
and liter, humus. The process is accompanied 
by the evolution of heat and sometimes light, 
but no gases are evolved. This slow decay adds 
to the fertility of the soil. It requires a long 
time for the constituents of matter to be re- 
solved into their primitive elements by this 
process; but they eventually become available 
as plant food again. Very little is lost in the 
atmosphere, and the soil in the end receives 
back even more plant food than the organism 
during its growth abstracted from it. Kvcn 
after the vegetable matter has been reduced to 
humus, the erevta < au."ii still continues with 
the formation of nitric acid, which is, as has 
already been said, the most easily assimilable 
form of nitrogen. 

Fermentation and Putrefaction 
Are decomposition processes characteristic of 
all eompound organic bodies under certain con- 
ditions of temperature and equilibrium. In in- 
organic compounds chemical changes are gener- 
ally caused by the ailinities existing between 
elemental compounds of two or more different 
substances. 

Take the familiar instance of the slaking of 
lime and the evolutiou of carbonic acid from 
the carbonate when it is brought into contact 
with acids. The first has a stroug affinity for 
water and absorbs it bodily, as it were, the re 
suit being a true chemical compound. The case 
of salt or .:ugar dissolved in water is entirely 
diff.-rent. Here there is simply mechanical 
division between the particles of the salt or 
sugar. They are, as it were, distributed in the 
molecular interstices of the water. If the water 
be driven off" by evaporation the sugar remains 
iu its original form aud value. Likewise slaked 
lime may be burned again into the oxide, hut 
the heat causes a chemical change, not merely 
a physical one as by the evaporation of water 
from a solutiou of sugar or salt. 

In the case of the treatment of carbonate of 
lime with sulphuric acid, for instance, a chemi- 
cal transposition ensues and carbonic acid is 
evolved. The products are sulphate of lime, 
carbonic acid and water. 

These inorganic reactions take place under all 
ordinary circumstances. But the processes of 
fermentation and putrefaction depend, in de- 
gree and iu the products formed, on the pre- 
vailing conditions of heat and equilibrium, and 
generally these processes must be set in motion 
by the presence of a ferment or ynast, whose 
particles are undergoing the same processes of 
decomposition. They are chemical transform- 
ation, induced in organic body by some exterior 
agencies, generally of similar original composi- 
tion. 

Inorganic chemistry presents phenomena of 
like reactions, / (., where a substance not gen- 
erally influenced by a chemical treatment is in 
the presence of some other compound rendered 
subject to the disintegrating action. Platinum 
is one of the most insoluble of metals. Nitric 
acid has not the slightest effect upon it in ordi- 
nary circumstances. It may be boiled with 
nitric acid without oxidizing. And even in the 
case of platinum black (platinum so finely com- 
minuted that the particles do not reflect lighti 
nitric acid has ordinarily no effect upon the 
metal. In strange contrast to this, when we 
treat an alloy of platinum and silver with ni- 
tric acid, the alloy is completely dissolved. 
Here the contact of the oxidizable silver has 
caused the platinum to undergo the same proc 
1 ess. Just so the process of ferments and putre- 
fying bodies starts and causes fermentation in 
acid and nitrogenous organic bodies. 

Products of Decay. 

Further than this, there seems to be no fixed 
relation between the component fermenting and 
putrefying bodies and the definite products 
formed. Surrounding circumstances induccdiffer- 
ent changes. Ordinary cellulose when treated 
with sulphuric acid may be literally burned to a 
char, or it may eventually be changed to sugar, 
and there are numerous intermediate processes. 

In beer making the ordinary grades will not 
bear prolonged contact with atmospheric oxy- 
gen without souring — fermenting, the sugar and 
dextrin being to a greater or less degree con- 
verted into acid. By the Bavarian process, and 
in the manufacture of superior grades of ale and 
portt r, the oxidation has been carried on under 
such conditions as to completely overcome the 
affinities of the constituent of the liquor for 
more oxygen. This being done, such fermented 
liquors will not suffer further decomposition 
when exposed to the air. 

Changes by fermentation and putrefaction 
seem to be dependent largely upon the state of 
equilibrium existing between the component, 
elemental compounds of the substance. Liebig 



Joly 18, 1885.] 



fACIFie t^URAlo fRESS. 



39 



saya: "The cause producing these phenomena 
(influences exerted by some agent upon ordi- 
narily stable.oompounds) will be also recognized, 
by attentive observation, in those matters 
which excite fermentation or putrefaction. All 
bodies in the act of combination or of decomposi- 
tion have the property of inducing these pro- 
cesses; or, in other words, of causing a disturb- 
ance of the statical equilibrium in the attrac- 
tions of the elements of complex organic mole- 
cules, in consequence of which those elements 
group themselves anew according to their spe- 
cial affinities." 

Eremac only progresses in the presence of 
free oxygen. Fermentation and putrefaction 
often take place in confined atmospheres, and 
therefore, as they are oxidizing processes, they, 
in such cases, act as powerful reducing agents. 
Bog ores, metallic sulphides, sulphurets, etc, 
owe their formation to the deoxidation of per- 
oxides by organic matter undergoing decay in 
absence of free oxygen. 

During fermentation odorless gases are 
evolved, and we may say that fermentation pro- 
ceeds only, or nearly so, in non-nitrogenous 
substances. 

Putrefaction evolves gases of a more or less 
disagreeable odor. The gases are not character- 
istic of the process, yet the action of oxidation 
seems to cause their evolution just as arsenic or 
arsenious oxide give no smell until heated with 
an oxidizing agent, when the characteristic 
garlic odor is evolved. 

Fermentation is applied to those bodies 
whicli undergo a seemingly spontaneous change 
with generation of heat and ebullition of gas- 
eous matter. 

Chemically, fermentation is the change 
brought about in a substance out of contact 
with oxygen and caused by the action of a 
ferment. It is the chemical decomposition or 
breaking up of an organic body into several 
elements or compounds. There are numerous 
kinds of ferment — vinous, acetic, lactic, sac- 
charous, etc. The action of diastase in malt 
converts starch into sugar and dextrine. 

Putrefaction is a fermentation or decay of ni- 
trogenous bodies generally in a limited supply 
of oxygen. Gases of disagreeable odor are 
generally evolved. It is a reduction process, 
and hence nitric acid can never be formed dur- 
ing the putrefaction proper. Fermentation, 
likewise, is sometimss a reduction process. 
Evidently, then, no nitric acid can be formed 
in organic matters undergoing fermentation or 
putrefaction in the absence of free oxygen. 
For the processes always give rise to protoxides 
of a high degree of oxidability, i. e., a great 
affinity for oxygen, much more so than nitrogen 
or ammonia, and these low oxides therefore 
combine with all of the available oxygen, leav- 
ing the nitrogen and ammouia to pass off as 
gases. 

We may remark, then, that always during 
fermentation or putrefaction, in absence of fres 
oxygen, nitrogen and ammonia are lost unless 
retained by some absorbent or substance of 
chemical affinity artificially applied. 

Processes Working Together. 
These three processes, erema causis, fermenta- 
tion and putrefaction, may and do go on at the 
same time in tho same body. Erema cansis goes 
on in those parts fully exposed to the air, while 
in the depths of the pile, heat and fermentation 
take place with the liberation of ammonia and 
other gases; and in some parts containing 
much nitrogenous and sulphurous matter, putre- 
faction goes on with the abstraction of oxygen 
from peroxide bodies. 

The Processes Applied. 
It is easy to see, then, that there may be 
different grades of manure as well as of any 
other product, and that the amount of benefit 
derived from the manure pile will depend 
largely upon the amount of nitric acid and am- 
monia retained in the manure heap. For all 
that is washed into the soil, or passes into the 
air, is lost for the time being at least. Absence 
of air and alternate wet and drought promotes 
fermentation and putrefaction. Therefore, it 
is of the first importance that the manure pile 
should be sheltered from the rain, kept in a 
moist condition by sprinkling at intervals dur- 
ing dry weather, and freely exposed to the air; 
not spread out, but piled in tiers or heaps. And 
lastly, as even when free oxygen is present 
much ammonia escapes oxidation to nitric acid 
and passes off' into the air, it is well to have a 
barrel of gypsum (plaster, sulphate of lime), 
and to sprinkle the pile with a few handfuls of 
this several times a week. 

When the gaseous ammonia comes in contact 
with the gypsum, it is changed into the sul 
phate of ammonia and retained in the pile. 
Like nitrates, this substance is very soluble in 
water, and it may easily be leached from the 
pile. 

If every farmer would procure a little treat- 
ise on composting, and follow a few of the 
simplest directions in caring for his manure 
pile, there would not be so much complaint of 
the "inefficiency of barnyard manure." 

Valuable Matter Lost. 
More valuable matter is wasted by the loss of 
the liquids of the stable than from all other 
sources. The urine contains almost the entire 
nitrogenous waste of 'he animal body. The 
excretion from the kidneys consists mainly of 
the waste and unassimilated matter of the al- 
bumenoid foods, and as such contains in solu- 
tion much that is of the most benefit to plants, 
and of the greatest cost as fertilizers. Urine, 
besides uric acid, a highly nitrogenous com- 
pound, contains common salt, sulphates and 



phosphates of sodium and potassium, and phos- 
phates of ammonia, calcium, iron, magnesia, 
etc. These substances are among those of 
greatest commercial value as fertilizers, yet the 
farmer ne^lectingly allows his stable floor to 
soak them up and waste them for him. 

Human excrement and urine are of all fertil- 
izers the most concentrated and valuable. 
From the varied nature and quality of man's 
food, the waste contains more matter of value 
as plant food than that of any other animal. 
Could all of the sewerage and waste from cess- 
pools, etc., of our large cities be returned to 
the soil there would be a decided falling off in 
the dependence upon artificial fertilizers and an 
increased yield per acre on such cultivated 
soils. By carefully utilizing every particle of 
human urine and excrement the Japanese and 
Chinese are enabled to get along without buy- 
ing fertilizers; and when the earth-closet system 
shall have been adopted in the "civilized" world 
we may look for a large increase of soil produc- 
tiveness and a decrease of crop failures,, to say 
nothing of the increase in the general health 
which must follow the abolishment of the pres- 
ent inefficient system of sewerage. 

Wheatland, Cal. M. H. Durst. 



J^Or^TIQUbTUr^E. 



The Future in Fruit. 

Editors Press: — The cry of "over-produc- 
tion" of California fruits has been a constant 
cry ever since I have been in the State — nearly 
10 years I was calmly advised in 1877 not to 
plant a nursery with the expectation of selling 
the trees, as there were already too many or- 
chards! We should, in all probability, hear 
the same thing a hundred years hence, were we 
still alive. The laws regulating "supply and 
demand" are too well regulated to be so easily 
overturned. The history of the world always 
has been and doubtless will continue to be a 
chronicle of success and failure, and so it will 
be with fruit-growing in California. 

Those who have recently taken up their 
abode in the State, or who contemplate doing 
so, must feel bewildered sometimes at the con- 
tradictory statements to be found in public 
print. One day may be seen an item in which 
it is shown that a man buys 50 acres of land for 
$5,000, plants it to fruit trees and sells out in 
five years for $40,000; and such cases have been 
of frequent occurrence. Another day the same 
paper may state that whole boat loads of fruit 
have been "dumped into the bay," because the 
market was glutted — that the canneries were 
overstocked and had not sold their last year's 
pack, that the "Eastern market had been thor- 
oughly tested and found to be a failuie;" this 
last assertion is taken from the Sin Francisco 
Post of some weeks ago, as is also the expres- 
sion "dumped into the bay." The newcomer 
to California may well ask, "Why such antagon- 
istic statements?" In answer I would say, first, 
that any orchard of suitable*varieties, ij a suit- 
able locality, and of sufficient quantity, prop 
erly taken care of, does pay, and will con- 
tinue to do so, a larger interest on the invest- 
ment than any other branch of farming, and 
that $500 to $ 1,000 per acre is not too high a 
value to be placed upon such an orchard at five 
years old. 

The one great cause of the failures in fruit- 
growing that must come is a want of knowledge, 
foresight and wisdom to plant the proper vari- 
eties and in proper quantities. For instance, 
99 men out of 100 in planting a 10-acre orchard 
will have 5, 10, 20 or more varieties, when there 
should net be more than one. It is useless to 
plant less than 10 acres of a kind. The mixed 
orchards that we see on every hand must de- 
pend entirely upon the local and San Francisco 
market, hence the "overstock" we read so 
much about. Were California a thickly popu- 
lated country, teeming with manufacturing 
cities, it would be different. As it is, California 
is a sparsely peopled State, depending almost 
entirely upon agriculture for its support, and 
looking to Eastern and European markets to 
take her produce. Who ever thought of wheat, 
for years the staple product of the State, find- 
ing a home market': 

Ten acres of prunes, of plums, of apricots, 
peaches, or pears, can always be sold to K istern 
shippers, or can be shipped on the consignee's 
responsibility to Eisteru firms. This hps been 
done repeatedly already this season, and the 
net proceeds have been better than they would 
have been in San Francisco, notwithstand 
ing the great expense in shipping so far. 
Ten acres of prunes means, after live years, from 
50 and up to '200 pounds of dried prunes per tree, 
or $2 to $8 per tree at 4 cents a pound. It will 
pay a man to run a 10-acre prune orchard, and 
dry his prunes properly, putting them up in 
the most approved methods; but 10 acres mixed 
of almost all the fruits that are known will be 
nothing but vexation and disappointment, 
winding up with failure. 

Ten teres of apricots is an average yield of 
sixty tons, which, at He per pound, is $1,800; 
and this is a low estimate. If the canners don't 
want them, or they are not shipped Kast, it is 
easy to erect a small Wheeler cannery and put 
them up in glass, or cook down to jam. 

A firm engaged in shipping fruit to the East, 
recently told a friend of mine that if he would 
plant a large orchard of Hungarian prunes he 



could not do better; they would buy the crop 
every year. This same gentleman was in Bos- 
ton recently when a lot of Hungarian prunes 
from California were opened. They arrived in 
perfect condition, and colored better in the 
boxes than on the tree. They sold at 5 cents 
each.. And the Hungarian prune is a fruit 
which the pessimist delights to speak of as be- 
ing "dumped in the bay!" True, it is easy to 
glut the San Francisco market with them, but 
only grow them in sufficient quanti'ies so that 
one, five or ten cars may be loaded, and they 
can go East as readily as potatoes, if picked 
and packed properly, and will net the producer 
3 or 4 cents or more. 

The expression, "dumped in the bay," which 
some of the newspaper men delight to roll in 
their mouths, means simply that either there 
is a glut in the market, temporarily, and 
the fruit has to be sold very cheap to Italians 
and others, or for hog feed; or, which is more 
often the case, a consignment of fruit has been 
received in bad condition, badly packed, over- 
ripe, or wormy, which has to be carted off to 
the hog pens. 

What wonder is it tha t the "canneries are 
overstocked" when they send tons of filthy 
trash to the East and to London as samples of 
California's boasted products? This is an old 
story, but none the less pertinent. I have my- 
self opened cans labelled "cherries," of a lead- 
ing brand, which turned out to be small, green 
apricots, scarcely larger than a Napoleon, or 
"Centennial" cherry, and could fill pages relat- 
ing to similar experiences. Some two years ago 
the statement was made in public (and I was 
taken to account in the Rural for protesting 
against such a statement), that the London mar- 
ket was glutted with California apricots! 
What unheardof, monstrous absurdity! Two 
and three years ago the canners had to pay 
three to four cents for apricots, and canned all 
the trash they could save from the hogs. This 
is what "glutted the London market." Send a 
ship load, or a fleet of the best California fruits, 
put up in glass, to Liverpool or London, and it 
will find a ready sale. 

The oracle of the Post also said, "the East- 
ern market had been thoroughly tested, and 
proved a failure." Let this wiseacre travel all 
through the East and he may perchance meet a 
man who has heard of some one having seen or 
smelt of California fruits. Have not Porter 
Bros., perhaps the largest Eastern shippers 
hitherto, become rich on the enormous profits 
they have made in shipping fruit to Eastern 
markets? And this, notwithstanding a great 
many losses though inexperience in packing 
and high freight rales. 

The great fact remains the same, that a lim- 
ited area of the Pacific Coast can grow certain 
fruits, grapes, olives, etc., which can scarcely 
be raised anywhere else on the continent, and 
nowhere profitably, and we certainly can, as 
this season is already proving, land these 
products in the great markets of the East at 
such prices that the people can afford to buy 
them. 

If not, what shall we do? Leave California, 
and seek a "better land?" If fruit-farming 
"won't pay" in California, what will? Will the 
Post and other pessimists please answer? 

Napa, July 6, JSS5. Leonard Coates. 



Blackberries, New and Old. 

Editors Press: — Among the new blackber- 
ries the Eirly Harvest has proved to be by far 
earliest and most productive of any of the early 
berries I have tried so far. The plants are vig- 
orous, upright growers. The fruit, though a 
little soft for shipping, is of good size for an 
early berry, yet it lacks the rich, spicy flavor 
to be found in those which ripen later. It is 
nearly three weeks earlier than the old standard 
Lawton, and about 10 days ahead of Wilson's 
Early. The berries grow in clusters and ripen 
nearly all at ooce. 

Early Cluster, which was introduced as the 
best of- ail the early blackberries, seems to be a 
slow grower, quite thorny and a week or two 
later than Early Harvest. The berries though 
of medium size are excellent. No doubt it 
does better in some localities. 

Wachusett Thornless is an old berry, valu- 
able on account of its habit of producing only a 
few thorns. The plants are of a dwarf habit. 
The berries, which ripen witli the Lawton, are 
of medium size and fine quality. It is hardly 
worth cultivating here as the tender branches 
are often scalded by our bright sun, and the ber- 
ries which it produces here are not to be com 
pared with those which we have seen grown 
near where it originated on the Atlantic Coast. 

Lawton, or New Rochellc. — This well-known 
berry is grown in this vicinity more than all 
other kinds together; it yields enormous crops 
of large, glossy, fine-looking berries, and if al- 
lowed to ripen tho'oughly on the vines it is 
soft, sweet and delicious. It is almost always 
picked too green when sent to market and those 
only who raise the berries themselves can judge 
its great excellence. It remains in bearing a long 
time and on rich, moist soil produces a pretty 
good second crop of extra large berries. In this 
vicinity the Lawton will produce twice as much 
fruit as any other variety except the Mammoth 
Dewberry. It thrives best within 50 miles of 
the coast. 

Kittatinuy. - -This is usually described as large 
or very large. Here it is on'y medium size, and 
not very productive, It begins to ripen a few 



days before the Lawton, and is rich, swei i 
excellent. The berries are not easy to pic.v 
account of a superabundance of long, sharp 
spines. 

Texas Hybrid. — This makes a great growth 
of half-standing, half-trailing canes, but pro- 
duces few berries, which, when ripe, are of a 
dirty shade of red, which is very much against 
them, as they have the appearance of being 
half ripe. We have not yet found out what 
the Texas Hybrid is good for. 

Oregon Evergreen. — Great stories are told 
about the productiveness of this berry in Ore- 
gon. It is probably an improved seedling of 
the old English "Cut-leaved" blackberry. The 
wood is perennial, and if the vines are trimmed 
back as o her blackberries usually are, will pro- 
duce suckers in abundance and very little fruit. 
The plants should be trained to a single stem, 
which, under favorable circumstances, will 
climb almost as far as a grape vine, and bear an 
abundance of fruit, which is late but very sweet 
and delicious. 

Crystal White bears a few medium-sized, light 
cream-colored berries, which are sweet and 
good. The plants produce a thicket of suckers. 
It is worthless except as a curiosity. 

Mammoth Dewberry. — An improved variety 
of the trailing blackberry. This bears the 
largest, earliest and most delicious fruit of any 
of the blackberry family. It is extremely pro- 
ductive, never suckers likeother blackberries,but 
has to be grown from rooted tips like black-cap 
raspberries, hence cannot be multiplied as fast 
as other varieties. The blossoms resemble sin- 
gle white roses. It seems to do better when 
trained on a trellis, and as the berries are ripen- 
ing the whole surface looks black with fruit. If 
we could have but one kind of berries, this 
would be cur choice. 

Besides some rare species from China, Japan 
and Australia, we have twelve other new and 
highly recommended varieties growing, but can- 
not estimate their value yet, and some two thou- 
sand seedlings, selected from many thousands for 
their vigorous appearance, many of which are 
bearing this year, and give promise of some- 
thing better to come in the way of vigorous 
plants and big sweet berries. 

Santa Horn, Cal. Luther Burisank. 



The Myrobolan Root, 

Editors Press: — I notice in the Rural for 
July !lth some account of Mr. O'Ncil's trees on 
myrobolan stock. My own opinions, backed 
up with practical experience with the myro- 
bolan stock in California, are somewhat as fol- 
lows: 

All plum stocks dwarf the tree and fruit, 
more or less, and tend to early bearing, the 
myrobolan in particular, therefore I would 
never use it, except when it was desirable to 
plant in wet land, where the peich or almond 
stock will not succeed, or under circumstances 
noted below. The plum stock is used almost 
exclusively in England, France, and to a large 
extent in the East, because it is hardier than 
the peach, and induces early bearing. For 
neither of these reasons would we use it here. 

Young trees in the nursery make a very 
strong growth on the myrobolan root, and after 
they are transplanted until they begin to bear. 
I will give one instance among many to show 
how it dwarfs the tree and fruit. At the or- 
chard of Mr. A. D. Lowell, of Sonoma, are two 
or more rows of yellow egg plum, one row on 
peach root and one on myrobolan, side by side 
in same soil and the same age. Those on the 
peach are large, fine trees, with immense fruit; 
those on myrobolan are small, very bushy and 
dwarfed, and the fruit is only half the size of 
the other. 

The myrobolan is undoubtedly the best of 
any plum stock, and is a good stock for the 
French prune, where size is not so much of an 
object, or for those varieties of plum which do 
not unite well on the peach or almond. Why 
then should we use it generally ? The peach is 
certainly the best stock for the peach and also 
for all other large stone fruits, with some few 
exceptions, or at least as good as any other, and 
I think better. The longevity of the peach is 
as great as any, for proof of which note the 
suckers which come from the roots of old peach 
orchards, and which will always make a vigor- 
ous tree after the original is dead. 

While speaking of stocks I must take the op- 
portunity again to denounce the apricot root. 
I can see no advantage except for the nursery- 
men, as it buds easily and as late as October, 
the bark slipping for a very long season. A 
heavy wind the other day blew over a French 
prune tree in our orchard five years old and 
full of fruit. It was an apricot root and broke 
oil' at the bud, showing no union except a slight 
one at the outer edge. Fortunately there are 
only a dozen or so on that root, and the goph- 
ers have taken them. Leonard Coates. 

Napa. 

|As we understand it, Mr. O'Neil claims a 
marked difference between tho true myrobolan 
of Kurope and the cherry plum which is re- 
garded as a synonym for myrobolan in this 
country. He claims that the cherry plum as a 
stock will do the dwarfing whioh Mr. Coates 
describes, but the true myrobolan does not 
dwarf. We presume he will write for himself 
just what he claims in this matter - — Eds, 
Press.] 



40 



f ACIFI6 I^URAL> p RESS 



[Joly 18, 1885 



Matrons of Husbandry. 

Correspondence on Grange principles and work and re- 
ports of transactions of subordinate Granges are respect 
fully solicited (or this department 

The Ruel Gridley Fund. 

The following account furnishes some addi- 
tional information to the account published in 
last week's Press: 

Kiiitors Press: — The Stockton Independent 
had urged that instead of spending a large sum 
on the 4th of July, part of the money be used 
for a monument fund for Gridley. Kveryonc felt 
that something ought to be done. Ladies of 
Stockton had issued a call for subscriptions. 
Sister W. L. Overhiser proposed that Stockton 
Grange do something, which met approval. 
Sister West said: "Have a lunch and ice cream 
on the Fourth." It was soon decided on and in 
an hour three of the committee, W. M. 
K etch ti m and Sisters Adams and Ashley, had se- 
cured at a nominal price a hall in Masonic Tern 
pie, dishes and tables, expressage paid, of 
Bro. A. Kaston, and gas fixtures from J. Jack- 
son. 

The committee was far apart, yet through 
the great aid of Rawlins Post, G. A. R., and 
others who helped nobly, the hall and tables 
fairly invited the appetites and purses of the 
public, who turned out in overwhelming num- 
bers at noon, so that many had to go away. 
Fifteen hanging baskets furnished by Bros. 
West and Clowes lent their grace, while white 
curtains, headed with bunting, screened the 
provisions, and choice flowers perfumed the 
tables. Mrs. Adams, Commander Henry," of 
the O. A. R., and others, placed a fine picture 
of the humanitarian, wreathed with delicate 
evergreen, beneath a green arch near the main 
entrance. Beneath, on a handsomely trimmed 
stand lay the immortal sack of flour that 
turned cut $275,000 to ease the pains and fever 
heat of the helpless soldiers. A large flag of 
the Mexican War veterans stood near. Grid- 
ley was a Mexican veteran. Sister Overhiser 
made three fine window pieces of fruit, grain 
and flowers, and Bro. Buhl emphasized our 
calling with fine bundles of wheat, among them 
the decorations. The Congregational Society 
gave up their lunch that day and loaned us 
their things. Prof. Clark placed tables and 
articles of the Business College (dining-room) at 
our disposal. Grocers, bakers, merchants and 
citizens were liberal to us, so that our expenses 
were only S.50.90. Receipts from the tables, 
§2.~>7,2. r >; soda and cigars, 810; pamphlets of his 
life, subscriptions, §(>4.30. Net receipts, 
$283..>0. Let San Francisco, Oakland, all the 
coast and Nevada take up the good work till 
the monument is built and the family comfort- 
able. 

Since the above was written .*I07.50 has been 
collected, making the whole amount !?3!)4.43. 
Stockton. Mrs. W. D. Ashlev. 

Facts About Gridley and His Family. 

The Modesto Republican says: "Mr. Gridley 
did not die in Modesto, neither is he buried 
here. The noble patriot died at Paradise, now 
an extinct town in this county, on Thanksgiv- 
ing day, 1870. The railroad having just been 
completed to Modesto, the remains were placed 
on board of the cars and taken to Stockton, 
where they were interred in one of the ceme- 
teries. ( iridley : s family subsequently moved to 
Modesto, where they have resided ever since, 
their financial condition being such that they 
could do nothing toward marking the spot 
where the husband and father lies, and the 
Stockton people having until lately shown but 
little inclination toward erecting a monument 
over his grave, Grant Post of Modesto, G. A. 
R., about two years ago concluded to remove 
the remains to Modesto and have them interred 
in the Grand Army plot of this place. It was 
then that Rawlins Post of Stockton concluded 
also to do something toward the noble dead, 
and under promises that they would procure 
funds to erect a costly monument over his 
grave, they succeeded in persuading the 
Modesto people to allow the remains to rest 
in Stockton, where the grave, as already 
stated, has been allowed until the present time 
to remain unmarked. 

The lack of respect for the dead hero is noth- 
ing compared with the little interest manifested 
by the American people for Gridley's family, 
whose circumstances have frequently been her- 
alded by the press of the State. At the time of 
his death, (iridley left a widow in poor health, 
three young daughters and a son to battle for 
an existence. Of these, the oldest daughter 
died. The son married and is now the father of 
several children, two of which have been crip- 
pled by disease, oneattlieted with spinal trouble 
and the other with a disease in the hip. Age 
has not in a measure improved Mrs. < iridley 's 
health, while the two remaining daughters, 
though not gifted with a strong constitution, 
earn a scanty living for the family by sewing. 
This is exactly the condition under which a 
Republican reporter yesterday found the family 
of a man, who during life did more to alleviate 
the suffering of the noble patriots who fell 
wounded in their country's service than any 
other single individual. The widows of Lin- 
coln, Garfield, John Brown and many others 
have been well provided for by a patriotic peo- 
ple, but we are sorry to admit the fact that 
Gridley and his family have been sadly ne- 
glected." 



Co-operation in Productive Enterprise. 

As co-operation in the disposition of soil pro- 
ducts is now a prominent theme for discussion 
in this State, because of the effort now being 
made by the Sacramento county fruit-growers 
and the San Luis Obispo dairymen, we have 
thought a little transcript from the experience 
of our New Zealand neighbors might be in- 
structive and encouraging. We find in the 
last received tiles of the Weekly Nev* of Auck- 
land a report of a lecture delivered May 2">th 
by Mr. W. A. Graham, Chairman of the Board 
of Directors of the North New Zealand Farm- 
I era' Co-operative Association, on co-operation 
at Te Awamutu. After some remarks on the 
general question, Mr. Graham said their so- 
ciety was one year old on that day, 
and it should be satisfactory to tell 
them that in that year, starting with 
a capital of little over £3, 000, it had 
turned it over seven times. It had now been 
decided to extend its operations and the meat 
market was considered as the direction in 
which the farmers could be most benefited. 
They proposed erecting slaughtering yards in 
Waikato,|sending the carcasses to Auckland and 
selling them to local butchers. The meat in 
Auckland would be retailed in three or four dis- 
tributing shops, in the most populated parts of 
that town. To do this they had called up 
fresh capital, aud must rely much on the en- 
ergy and hearty co opiration of members. 
With regard to the principles of their society, 
he pointed out that there were two systems of 
working co-operative societies, the one called 
the Civil Service system, where prices to 
consumers were cut down to the lowest possi- 
ble figure and the profit was expended in a divi- 
dend; the other the Rochdale system, known U 
"Fair Trade," where, without going into con- 
flict with the store-keeper or others, fair prices 
were charged and a small dividend was supple- 
mented with a bonus out of the profits for 
the trade done with the society by each mem- 
ber. He w ished to see their association carried 
on on the llochdale principle. The lecturer iu 
showing the market to be opened to New 
Zealand farmers by their co operation associa- 
tion federacy with the societies at home, re- 
ferred to the Irish butter trade which had 
grown up ,)0 to 70 per cent of late years, 
but the Irish farmer did not participate in the 
benefit, which was absorbed by the middleman 
until they worked their sales through the co- 
operative societies. 

Mr. Gane (managing director) then addressed 
the meeting. They had done £25,000 in busi- 
ness during the year. The busiuess of the as- 
sociation had beeu conducted carefully and ten- 
tatively. Perhaps it had not realized the ex- 
pectations of every one, but they had developed 
surely, if slowly. They had benefited the set- 
tler to the extent of 15 per cent in the sale to 
him of seeds, manures, etc., which should 1>3 
looked upon as a dividend. Now, they pro 
posed to further benefit him by opening up a 
maiket for his beef. They could sell cheap and 
yet give the farmer his present prices. He 
thought the farmers of Waikato should go 
largely into the new issue of shares and con- 
tinue to be the controlling element in the asso- 
ciation. The outlay of calls would soon be re- 
couped by the increased price obtained for their 
fat meat. Mr. Kirk went into some startling 
figures on sales of meat, bread, and other prod- 
uce, showing that the middleman in New Zea- 
land eat the oyster and gave the producer the 
shells to the tune of some millions sterling. 

Before leaving, Mr. Jones expressed a hope 
that at an early date Mr. Graham would give 
them his views on the sugar-beet movement as 
he had done now on co-operation. Mr. Graham 
said he would be proud to do so. He hoped 
from the Co-operative Association would eman- 
ate sugar beet and woolen cloth factories and 
other industries. He had worked at co-oper- 
ation zealously and had full confidence in its 
value to productive enterprises. 

San Jose Notes. 

We had a pleasant call on Wednesday from 
Bro. Cyrus . I ones, of San .lose (J range, who re- 
ports his Grange vigorous and advancing and 
continually gaining new and desirable material, 
while the work done is such that it commends 
itself to the progressive farmers of the neigh- 
borhood, j 

The coming horticultural fair promises to be 
a gratifying success. The proposition to build 
a pavilion is still under consideration and will 
doubtless be realized in the future. For this 
year's exhibition a hired hall will be used. 
Messrs. Jones, Wilcox and Damn, who are the 
committee of arrangements in this particular, 
have secured the large hall under the Califor- 
nia Theater, on Second street, and the fair will 
be held August 24th to 29th inclusive. It will 
be a general exhibit of orchard, vineyard, garden 
and cereal products, and will be adorned by a 
fine floral display. Space will also be given to 
interesting materials of other kinds. It is to 
be a free fair, the object being to set forth the 
resources and agricultural industries of the 
county, so that people generally nay be better 
informed upon them. All producers in the 
county are invited to contribute. No premiums 
will be given, but there may be judges and 
certificates of merit awarded, as this would add 
to the instructive features of the fair. These 



are, however, matters for future arrangement. 
We have no doubt the fair will 'be a notable 
success and reflect credit upon those who show 
their spirit aud enterprise iu contributing, and 
upon the whole county as well. 



A Great Grange Exhibition. 

Patrons who can go Fast during August may 
do well to remember the great Inter-State Pic- 
nic Kxhibition at Williams' Grove, Pa. . The 
Fd'mt r'x Friend has the following preliminary 
paragraph: letters of inquiry and applications 
for space are pouring in from all directions. 
Some six or eight new manufacturing firms have 
already made arrangements for the erection of 
large, commodious aud permanent warerooms 
on the premises, and visitors are rapidly engag- 
ing lodging or sleeping tents. Some of the 
leading lines of Western railroads are pre- 
paring fine exhibits, while a number of 
the Western and Southwestern States will 
send specimens of agricultural, horticult- 
ural and pomological products, together with 
samples of the minerals of various kinds found 
within their borders. 

The preparatory arrangements and improve- 
ments for the great Inter State Picnic Kxhibi- 
tion are rapidly approaching completion, and in 
a few more weeks Williams' Grove will be meta- 
morphosed into a very Island City, with sub 
urban villas, spacious streets and lovely prome- 
nades, teeming with the elite, the fashion, cul- 
ture and enterprise of the country. Never before 
w ere such extensive preparations made for this 
annual reunion of farmers, manufacturers, 
stock-raisers and mechanics from almost every 
State in the Union as are now in progress aud 
which, when fully finished, will impart a new 
charm to this delightful pleasure resort. Many 
buildings of a permanent character have been 
erected, aud as already intimated more are in 
process of construction. 

The railroad facilities will be complete iu 
in every particular, aud the management will 
provide against the possibility of .delay or 
accident. Those desiring tents must make 
application not less than twenty days in 
advance of the time for opening, or there 
will be no possibility of supplying the 
demand. Circulars giving full inform »- 
tion will be issued in a few days and dis- 
tributed to all parts of the country. This may 
not be the greatest show on earth, but it will 
be the greatest display of farm products, farm 
machinery and fine stock ever witnessed in the 
L'nited States. 



that it is fit only for peons. It is a fitting em- 
ployment for earnest, intelligent, and wide- 
awake American women and children, and the 
progress they are making in it in nearly all 
parts of the country is the best possible evi- 
dence of the fact. The comments of the Tri- 
tium are of the kind that injure most the one 
who makes them. 



The Character of Silk Culture. 

A New York telegram, dated luly 14th, to 
the Associated Pre83 is as follows: 

The Tribune says editorially: The raising of silk- 
worms is pretty harassing, exhausting and a degrad- 
ation of labor, and is fit only for peons and half- 
animal peasants. There is not much probability 
that the industry can ever be raised into any impor- 
tance in this country. It would not be good for the 
people of the country if it could be forced into tem- 
porary success. 

The New York Tribune is decidedly out of 
its head in this matter. It ought to know bet- 
ter. It is true that the successful rearing of 
worms requires knowledge, patience and a good 
deal of that peculiar quality for* which Ameri 
cans are famous, and which is expressed by that 
undelinable word "gumption,'' but as to its be- 
ing degrading, etc., why the holding of such a 
view argues ignorance. 

In spite of the noble efforts of the parent 
society at Philadelphia and other tributary or- 
ganizations, by which public-spirited and de- 
voted women are endeavoring to educate the 
people in the matter of silk culture, there out- 
crops occasionally such ignorance as that which 
the New York Tribum manifests. 

Whether the statement of the TribtUU be at- 
tributable to ignorance, or whether the ear of 
the editorial writer has been gained by some of 
the importers, who, of course, fight home pro- 
duction nf silk, it matters little. It is a gross 
libel upon the silk iadustry and a cruel blow at 
the public-spirited people, who are trying to 
develop a new and profitable employment for 
American women. We have so often shown 
the fitness of the business for women, who are 
wise and patient to proceed slowly, until they 
learn the conditions with which they have to 
contend, that it would weary our readers to 
recount the points which are directly at vari- 
ance with the claims of the Tribmi*. Let it be 
known, however, that the labor is not degrad 
ing, but, on the contrary, is pleasant, inspiring 
and elevating, and suited to the bright Ameri- 
can worker. On this point a recent report of 
the California State Board of Silk Culture 
fitly says: "Kxperiments show that we can 
produce better silk in America on account of 
the higher mental condition of our people, 
which shows itself in the ingenuity and invent- 
ive spirit ever improving on the worn-out crude 
methods of the Asiatic race, iu the perfection 
of machinery lessening manual labor, in 
the aid furnished by scientific researches, 
and in the quickness and skill of the work- 
men." 

The character of the women who are now en- 
gaged in silk culture in this State, not those 
who are promoting it from philanthropic mo- 
tives, but those who are actually producing silk 
for the sake of the reward which is gained by 
the employment of leisure hours, shows that 
their experience denies the claim of the Tritium 



J£g ^cultural ^Qotes. 

CALIFORNIA. 
Alameda. 

Fiei.ii Fikk. — Livermore Herald, July 9: 
Owing to the delay in issuing the H- raid this 
week, we are enabled to give the particulars of 
a field fire which has only barely escaped from 
being the most disastrous ever witnessed in thiB 
valley. For several days heading and threshing 
crews have been busily engaged on a crop of 
heavy barley in Joseph P. Black's large field 
I lying between the railroad and the county road 
from Pleasanton to Dublin, near the former 
place. The header wagons drew the grain 
direct to the separator, thus saving stacking. 
At noon to-day ( Friday) a spark from the ergiDe 
caught with great rapidity to the standing 
grain. All hands fought it with desperation, 
but fully fifty acres were burned before the 
flames could be subdued. The loss is estimated 
at 81,000, without a cent of insurance. The 
crop in the field, this year, was one of the 
heaviest in Alameda county. The fire was 
burning a little over thirty minutes, during 
which time both crews, fully armed with wet 
sacks, were fighting it with all their strength 
and energy. There was a strong wind blowing 
at the time, and it was only this energetic work 
which prevented the destruction of a belt of 
fine grain fully six miles in length, and reaching 
nearly to this town. < )ur farmers may well 
congratulate themselves upon their narrow 
escape. 

Fresno. 

Gkasshoim-ers and Bees. — Khitoks Press: 
No doubt you will be glad to hear from this 
section upon the all-absorbing topic, the grass 
hoppers and their depredations. Since discov- 
ering the poison remedy | which has been given 
in the Press], we have somewhat lessened their 
ravages by killing them in great quantities; but 
before this they attacked and devoured every 
vestige of vegetation in some places -eating 
every leaf from the grape vine; also cutting the 
stems of grapes from the vines, making a total 

i wreck of fine raisin vineyards, and leaving the 
owner of a twenty acre home to mourn his loss. 
The line raisin vineyard of .1. T. Goodman, 
four miles east of Fresno, will nearly all be 
saved through applying, thoroughly and unceas- 
ingly, this poison remedy; in fact, Mr. Good- 
man looks upon it as the salvation of his grapes. 
He has IliO acres of the best variety of Muscatel 
and Seedless Sultanas. Some are escaping 
with but little injury as yet, and still the hop- 
pers are here in numbers too numerous to men- 

I tion. The troublesome apiary is passing away 
— that is being moved to a distance where we 
expect immunity from their depredations upon 
our fruit. A meeting was held and a persuader 
was sent to the apiarist in the form of a com 
mittee of five, who advised him to move his 
bees at once or legal steps would ensue. — Mrs. 
A. L. Avrks, Tcmj>eranee. 

Merced 

The Kami. Farm. — Yalley Argtu, July 13: 
While at the farm of Adam Kah I, on Mari- 
posa creek last week, we rode on the harvester 
while cutting a round in a large field and were 
surprised at the excellent work the machine was 
accomplishing. The harvester is a "Honser," 
and heads, threshes, cleans and sacks the grain 
ready for market u neatly as any threshing out- 
fit can do the work. The field was turning out 
from 20 to 2."> bushels per acre. The yield of 
this farm this year will be about 4,000 sacks, 
against 13,000 harvested last year, which is re- 
garded as a first-class crop for the season with 
its many backsets. 

San Joaquin. 

TBI Wm» Side.— KdITOKH Press:— It has 
been a very quiet season on the West Side. 
Still, a few headers have been employed cutting 
feed, which consists of heads pretty well filled 
with grain. Both the early and late sown were 
total failures, but seed that happened to go in 
at exactly the right time bat ween filled out, al- 
though very short. A little experiment with 
rye compared well with barley. Kvergreen 
millet shows a disposition to survive the dry 
and heated term, but what with grasshoppers, 
which were very n umerous near the foothills, 
and squirrels, its fate is still uncertain. We 
have had a great deal of cool, windy weather 
this summer, which "they Bay" is a good 
omen for next winter. May their predictions 
prove true. — Mrs. J. M. K., Tracy, Col. 

ShtpPXS Harvester. — Lodi Sentinel, July 
II: On Thursday we had occasion to pass Sen 
ator Langford's ranch, where we learned 
he was running one of the 12-foot Shippee 
combined harvesters. The machine was one 
of the late improved 12-foot Shippee 
combined harvesters, and as the men in- 
formed us, they were cutting 20 acres per day 
in grain that was running 30 bushels to the 
acre — that the machine was taken new out of 
the shop and had ruu six days without a break 
or au hour's stoppage. We examined the straw 
and ground carefully and saw no waste at all. 
Throe men were doing the work with 14 horses, 



July 18, 1885] 



f ACIFI6 f^URAb fRESS. 



and in lighter grain 12 horses are all that are 
needed, but on account of the machine being 
new and the grain heavy they were then run- 
ning with an extra span. We then turned to 
the Senator and asked him how much per day 
it cost him to run the Shippee combined har- 
vester. He said, "It is not expensive; the 
horses are mine, I have to feed them anyway, 
and I pay the men $2 each per day, so the only 
money I really feel that I am out is the men's 
wages— $6 per day." He added, "we are put- 
ting in the sack about 600 bushels per day." We 
bade Mr. Langford good-day, and as we wended 
our way home.from the data received, we made 
figures which we think are correct as to the ex- 
pense of harvesting with a combined harvester 
as compared to the old method of heading, 
stacking and threshing. Everyone is not situ- 
ated so he can do the work as cheaply as Sen- 
ator Langford, so we will take in all the ex- 
penses of putting 20 acres in the sack that will 
run 30 bushels to the acre. Following is one 
day's work, amounting to GOO bushels: 

EXPENSES. 

Three men, $2 per day $ 6 oo 

Three men, board per day i 50 

12 horses, 50 cts. per day 6 00 

12 horses, board 25 els. per day 3 00 



Total $16 50 

EXPENSES OLD WAY. 

Heading 20 acres, at $1.25 $25 00 

Threshing 600 bushels, at 7 cts 42 00 

Total $67 00 

In this calculation the Shippee combined har- 
vester makes a clean saving of §50.50 per day, 
or $2.50 per acre over and above the old 
method of harvesting. At 20 acres per day it 
will take 40 days to cut. 800 acres, and $50 per 
day saved would, in one season, pay $2,000, or 
all the expenses of purchasing a combined har- 
vester. 

Sacramento. 
Dividing Larue Tracts. — See, July 13: The 
Directors of the Immigration Association of 
Sacramento county met yesterday afternoon at 
4 o'clock in the office of C. R. Parsons. The 
object was to hear the report of L. P. Martin. 
Some weeks since the association employed 
him to make a trip about the county to consult 
a number of large landholders, and ascertain 
where colonies and families could be located by 
the division of tracts. Mr. Martin found that 
a great many farmers about Florin would sub- 
divide their small farms at cheap rates. About 
8,000 acres in one tract, of good land, within 
from 13 to 16 miles of the city, can be had in 
small lots for from $20 to $30 an acre. The re- 
port of Mr. Martin shows that among the tracts 
which can thus be purchased, 320 acres at $25 
per acre, and 320 at $35 per acre, are offered by 
A. 1 Mummer; 480 acres at $25, by J. Hanlan; 
several thousand acres by Dr. Caples, of which 
he is having a map prepared for subdividing it; 
J, F. Davis has about 800 acres, which, it is 
understood, will be thus sold; G. K. Nye, own- 
ing 4,012 acres, will next season divide it 
among nine families of nephews and nieces, 
who will come from the Fast to occupy it. J. 
F. McCauley has 8,000 acres plotted and ready 
to be sold in lots to suit purchasers. Mr. Iller 
will sell 107 acres. Whittaker, Ray & Miles, 
of Gait, are considering the subject as to selling 
their large tracts near Gait. N. M. Fay, owner 
of the Whitcomb ranch, near Georgetown, con- 
sisting of four or five thousand acres, will sub- 
divide and sell. Mr. Martin suggested that 
the association should take step} to further en- 
lighten land-owners as to the object of the or- 
ganization. It was decided to prepare a circu- 
lar for the information of landholders in this 
county and asking certain information. 

Solano. 

California Plums at the East. — Vaeaville 
Judkion, July 11: During the present season 
a wish frequently expressed by those shipping 
East has been to hear directly from the con- 
sumer. Probably if each consumer of fruit 
should report the condition of its receipt, much 
valuable information would be obtained and an 
idea given of the vast territory over which the 
fruit is distributed after reaching Chicago. 
Among the boxes of fruit shipped June 2d, by 
Henry Bassford, was one in which Win. Wash- 
burn placed his address. He has received the 
following letter, which is self-explanatory: 

Mr. Washburn Dear Sir: This morning, 
while unpacking a box of plums, the writer 
noticed written on the bottom of the box "W. 
T. Washburn, Vaeaville, Solano Co., Cal." It 
occurred to him that that was the name of the 
person who packed the fruit, and that you 
w ould like to know who unpacked it, and in 
what condition it was in when the last party 
handled it. This is June 13th, and the plums 
in said box (dated June 2d) were a beautiful red 
color, in perfect order, not one plum bruised in 
the lot. We retail them at 15 cents per dozen. 
Harry Davis, 1203 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

Santa Barbara. 
Horticultural Society. — From the report 
in the Press: The meeting was held on the 
grounds of Mrs. Sawyer, in Montecito. Mr. 
Harper, on the Committee of Citrus Fruits, re- 
ported a good prospect for an excellent crop of 
oraDges and lemons. Mr. Stafford, on the Com- 
mittee of Irrigation, had found in his experience 
that the only fruits needing irrigation here 
were the orange and lemon; all others would do 
better without it. The Committee on Collection 
of Exhibits for the State Fair being called on 
for a report, Mr. Higgins related the experience 
of the Committee while in the northern parts 



of the county. Wherever they went there 
seemed to be great interest manifested in mak- 
ing the exhibit. Lompoc, he said, would send 
samples of cheese and butter, fruit and 
grain, < ! uadalupe samples of cheese and 
butter, Santa Maria and Santa Vnez 
samples of grain, Carpinteria samples of 
beans, potatoes, etc. The following local 
committees were appointed to act at the 
various places named, and to forward all ex- 
hibits received to Mayor Coffin, in Santa Bar 
bara: Santa Ynez, Messrs. Watkins and 
Walker; Los Alamos, Messrs. Perkins, Leslie, 
Hicks, Snyder, Hilton and Fairchild; Santa 
Maria, Messrs. Thornberg, Crow, Nance, Mer- 
ritt, Clevenger, Miller and Boyd; Guadalupe, 
Messrs. Rose, Johnson, Judge Scott, Dolcini, 
Bonetti and Fosc; Lompoc, Editor McLean and 
W. W. Broughton. It was suggested that all 
varieties of fruit be put up and that a commit- 
tee be appointed to solicit among our merchants 
for contribution of jars and for other aid to this 
enterprise. Mrs. Ashley, Mrs. Spence and Mr. 
Eells were appointed by the Chair. The soci- 
ety decided to contribute $250 to the fuud to 
bear the expenses of the exhibit. On motion 
that a committee of ladies be appointed to 
solicit aid for this exhibit among the ladies of 
the county, the Chair appointed Mrs. Hamer, 
Mrs. Packard, Mrs. HogueandMrs. Col. James. 

Santa Clara. 

A Car ok Apricots from San Jose. — Herald, 
July 10: At 1 o'clock this afternoon a carload 
of the finest Moorpark apricots was started to 
Chicago, consigned to Wm. Wehner, brother- 
in-law of Thos. Treanor, of this county. The 
packing was done in the best manner. Each 
individual apricot was wrapped in paper, which 
is stout enough to keep the fruit separate. The 
boxes contain 20 and some 25 pounds. They 
are the ordinary fruit boxes. Across each end 
of the lid is nailed a thin strip. As one of the 
desired objects to be attained is to keep the 
fruit immovable — both individually and with 
reference to the boxes — this is secured by first 
having the boxes so full that their sides are 
sprung, and by nailing them stationary in the 
car. In order to do this, and at the same time 
to secure ventilation throughout the entire load, 
strips about an inch thick are nailed along the 
ends of the boxes as they are arranged in tiers, 
the strips resting on the thin strips already 
mentioned as securing the lid. These inch strips 
prevent the bulging top and bottom of the 
boxes from touching, and render them perfectly 
immovable. While the boxes, as they lie one 
upon another, are separated by a little over an 
inch, the lateral space — that between boxes side 
by side — is about three inches. The freight 
charges were $000, or about three cents a pound, 
which alone is double the local market value of 
the fruit. In spite of this fearfully exorbitant 
charge the shippers expect to realize a net re 
turn of between three and four cents a pound, 
or from to two to two and a half times as much 
as they could get for their apricots in the local 
marls et. The boxes, according to past expen 
ence, will sell in Chicago for $2 a box, or ten 
cents a pound. The expenses for packing, haul 
ing, loading, shipping, unloading, drayage, com 
missions, etc., will all together amount to be 
tween 6 and 7 cents a pound. To M. Ascherberg 
is due the credit of this shipment. The names of 
the shippers of the carload of apricots that went 
to day, and the number of pounds sent by each, 
are as follows: Thos. Treanor, 2,200 pounds; 
W. W. Cozzens, (i,000; Dr. L W. Frary, 4,000; 
E. A. Pitkin, 1,900; I. D. Howe, 500; Baau 
kamp, 300; Britton, 300; Tenney, 200; Kelley, 
500; G. Riggio, 1,300; Penniman, 2,200; Ker- 
loch, 300; D. W. Miller, 400; Negus, 300, and 
Patterson, 175. 

San Jose Canneries. — Herald : At one of 
our fruit canneries 4,000 boxes of plums have 
been packed this week, and on Wednesday the 
first consignment this season of Bartlett pears, 
500 boxes, was received. At the same institu- 
tion, where blackberries, strawberries, apricots 
and peaches are being canned, there is a force 
at work of over 300 hands, and fifty barrels of 
sugar are daily used in the work [performed by 
them. At Dawson's cannery, on the Alameda, 
fifteen tons of apricots are used for the 15,000 
cans which are packed each day. Mr. Dawson 
does not expect to commence on peas until 
about the 1st of August, and is of the opinion 
that the work on fruit will conclude about the 
middle of September, when tomatoes and other 
vegetables will be canned. 

Sonoma. 

Petaluma Cannery. — Courier, July 8: Every 
person in Petaluma who feels au interest in its 
prosperity ought to visit the cannery. We 
visited it yesterday and felt delighted with 
what we witnessed. We saw 210 handi rang- 
ing from less than 10 up to 70 years of age, all 
busy at work, each one in his or her own de- 
partment, and all happy in doing their work. 
They were at work at the time on apricots, and 
yesterday put up 20,000 cans, most, if not all, 
from De Long's Novato ranch. Mr. D. E. 
Ashby, the gentlemanly superintendent, in- 
formed us that their pay roll of hands this 
week would be $1,500. John Fritsch is presi- 
dent, and H. T. Fairbanks, treasurer. The 
other members of the company are Messrs. 
De Long, of Novato, Marin county, L. F. Car- 
penter, Poehlmann Bros., J. W. Cassidy and 
W. H. Pepper, of Petaluma. The Petaluma 
Cannery is a fixed fact, is doing much good for 
our city and county and all should take an in- 
terest in it. 

Tulare. 

Grain. — Visalia Times: I. R. Rice, of Smith's 
Mountain, reports the crops as being good in 



that locality, and, in some instances, even ex- 
ceeding the expectations of the farmers. As 
yet they have no facilities for irrigation there, 
and agriculture is conducted with only such 
moisture as is obtained from rains. This condi- 
tion of affairs, however, will undergo a radical 
change as soon as the harvest is finished. The 
farmers have held frequent meetings in refer- 
ence to procu' ing irrigation, and, as a result, 
have effected the temporary organization of a 
ditch company, besides making arrangements 
with the 70 Canal Company for obtaining water. 
They have already plowed a ditch seven miles 
long, connecting with the 70 canal. Another 
branch will be constructed in the direction of 
Cricketville. Next fall wort will be resumed 
with scrapers. Mr. Rice claims that the soil in 
his neighborhood is as good as any in the county. 
From 170 acres, planted in wheat and barley, 
he got 893 sacks of wheat and 500 sacks of bar- 
ley, or an average of between eight and nine 
sacks to the acre. From 55 acres of summer- 
fallowed land he harvested 529 sacks of wheat. 
He says that summer- fallowing is the best way 
to cultivate the cereals, in order to make sure 
of good crops from year to year. His grain 
was harvested this season with the Houser ma- 
chine in a manner which gave him perfect satis- 
faction. It aggregated 180 acres, and was cut 
and sacked in a little less than six days — work 
beginning on Monday morning and ending on 
Saturday afternoon. He calculates that by 
harvesting in this way a saving of $150 is ef- 
fected on a ranch the size of his. He says that 
in his locality surface water can be found at an 
average depth of 16 feet. Last spring he dug 
a well on his place and reached water 13 feet 
from the surface. The soil is rich and heavy ; 
there is no alkali; and water alone is needed to 
make the land available for fruit and alfalfa. 

Ventura. 

Flax. — Ventura Signal, July 11: We have a 
letter from the agent of the California Cotton 
Mills Company, inquiring whether the estab- 
lishment he represents can procure here, for 
experimental purposes, ten tons of flax, "while 
yet in the flower." A concern of that kiud 
ought to know, it seems to us, that such a re- 
quest should have been made about May 0th, 
instead of July 6ch. The application comes 
sixty days too late. We have, however, in- 
formed the writer of parties with whom, if he 
chooses, he can contract for that or any other 
amount of the fiber next year. Flax culture in 
this couuty has a history. Some years ago the 
Selby Lead Works, in San Francisco (through 
"Alphabetical" Richards, of Saticoy) con- 
tracted to take the seed at three cents per 
pound, and farmers .vent into the business 
pretty extensively, the product being of excel- 
lent quality. This went on for about three 
years, the farmers providing themselves with 
the proper machinery for threshing and clean- 
ing the seed. Suddenly, after everyching was 
in working order, the Lead Works refused to 
contract, and beiug the only purchasers in the 
State, bought the crop at their own prices, from 
2 to 2{ cents, we believe. One business man 
informs us that the Lead Works that year real- 
ized at least $100,000 profits, at the expense of 
the farmers in this county. Of course the 
farmers dropped the business, and not 100 
acres of flax has since been raised in the county. 
If now, as the Cotton Mills seem to think, the 
fiber can be utilized as well as the seed, no 
more profitable crop can be raised. At least a 
ton of fiber to the acre can be grown and the 
money received for this will be olear profit, as 
heretofore the only use made of it has been to 
improve our roads. To secure some of it, how- 
.ever, the company must be prepared to con- 
tract now for next season's crop. We hope 
they will do so. 



com- 
We 



The Coming Fairs. 



We give below a partial list of this year's 
fairs on this coast. We shall print the list 
from time to time with such corrections and 
additions as may come to our notice. We trust 
the officers of all fairs, whether district, county 
or town, will inform us at once of locations and 
dates of their exhibitions: 

Bay District Association, San Francisco, August 
1st, 4th, 6th, 7th and 8th. 

Sonoma County Agricultural Park Association, 
Santa Rosa, August 17th to 22d. 

Sonoma and Marin District Fair, Petaluma, 
August 24th to 29th. 

Mechanics' Institute Fair, San Francisco, will 
open August 25th. 

Petaluma Fair, August 25th to 29th. 

Golden Gate Fair, Oakland, August 21st to Sep- 
tember 5th. 

Seventeenth Agricultural District— Nevada and 
Placer counties, Glenbrook Race Track, September 
1st to 5th. 

State Agricultural Society, Sacramento, September 
7th to t9th. 

Stockton Fair, September 22d to 26th. 

San Jose Fair, September 28th to October 3d. 

Mt. Shasta District Fair at , September 30th 

to October 3d. 

Nevada State Fair, Reno, October 12th to 17th. 

Pacific Coast Blood Horse Association races in 
November. 

• Domestic and Fat Stock Show, first annual exhi- 
bition, Portland, Oregon, October — to — . 

Oregon State Fair at Salem, September 21st to 
26th. 

Travel in the vicinity of Quijotoa, A. T., is 
very dangerous unless supplies of water are 
taken along. No rain has fallen since Decem- 
ber and the water hole? are all dried up. 



(^NTOMOLOGIGAb. 

The Cottony Cushion Scale. 

The Los Angeles county horticultural 
mission has issued its second bulletin, 
gave in the las'; Press their first official an- 
nouncement. From the second we quote as 
follows concerning killing scale insects: The 
commission recommend that the following plan 
of operations be followed where the cottony 
cushion scale has infected any orchard: 

In all cases of infection from the white cot- 
tony cushion scale it is recommended that the 
tree be thoroughly sprayed previous to any 
pruning. This plan is deemed the better one, 
because the danger of scattering and spreading 
the insects is much less than in the practice of 
cutting back or thinning out the trees previous 
to medicating. If properly and thoroughly ap- 
plied this firs.t application will kill a consider- 
able proportion of the bugs, many of which, if 
the trees were first pruned or cut back, not- 
withstanding the use of great caution and care 
in removing brush to the fire, will fall to the 
ground and seek adjoining trees or plants for 
food and bretdiog spots. Use for spraying 
white scale 35 pounds of whale oil soap, 4 gal- 
lons of coal oil — 110 degrees fire test — to every 
100 gallons of water. The coal oil must be an 
emulsion with the soap first, then add balance 
of soap and water in the following manner: 
First boil the soap in as little water as possible, 
as the soap must be thick to take up the coal 
oil and make a proper emulsion. When thor- 
oughly dissolved and well boiled, place five 
gallons of this hot soap in an empty barrel, 
some distance from the boiling kettle, to pre- 
vent accident from fire — then add coal oil and 
churn vigorously for about ten minutes with a 
stick with cross pieces about five inches wide 
at the end forming a T. If the mixture at this 
time turns to a thick cream, pour in a little 
water — say two gallons — and churn again for a 
few moments, then add five or more gallons of 
water. Do not pour water in all at once,Jbut 
a little at a time, aud churn constantly while 
pouring in the water. This mixture when 
properly emulsified will form a whitish creamy 
substance. The most particular attention must 
be given to make the emulsion properly — other- 
wise the oil not being inci rporated with the 
soap and water, will rise to the top, and 
while portions of the tree will receive an over- 
dose of kerosene other parts will get little else 
than soap and water. The result will be un- 
satisfactory, for the coal oil must go with the 
soap to do effectual work in killing the bug. 
As soon as practicable after applying the first 
application, proceed to cut back and thin out 
the tree — burning the brush as near tne tree 
from which it is taken as possible without in- 
jury to the tree. A large canvas under the tree, 
during the pruning, will, if carefully disinfected 
at the finish, prove of considerable benefit. 

A band of rope thoroughly smeared with coal 
tar, about the trunk of the tree, first putting a 
baud of leather or thick cloth over which to tie 
the rope, will prevent the insect from ascend- 
ing, and tend to indicate its presence and loca- 
tion for future treatment. Cases of ordinary 
infection can undoubtedly be cured if the above 
is carried out faithfully aud to the very letter, 
and by keeping such close watch over the trees 
that the reappearance of the bug is at once fol- 
lowed by an application of the spray before any 
time has elapsed for breeding or spreading. In 
aggravated cases of infection where the bug 
has a strong hold upon the tree — topping, caie- 
ful brush burning and hand scrubbing must be 
resorted to. But even in such cases the use of 
the spray at first would much simplify the 
work and lestea the danger of scattering and 
spreading the scale bugs. It is highly neces- 
sary to success that all weeds in the vicinity of 
infected trees should be carefully gathered up 
and burned. 

For the red scale, July and August are the 
best months to spray in, as they hatch during 
May and June. Use 35 pounds of soap aud 
three gallons of coal oil to every 100 gallons. If 
sprayed in September or October add five 
pounds of soap. 

The best months to spray for black scale are 
September and October. They hatch through 
July and August. Use 30 pounds of soap and 
two and one-half gallons coal oil to every 100 
gallons of water. Thinning out and cutting 
away all surplus wood will do much towards 
relieving the trees from black scale. Care 
should be taken to strain the wash through fine 
wire cloth, otherwise frequent stops will be 
necessary to clear the spray nozzle. 

Grasshoppers and Rye. 
Hon. G. W. T. Carter, who is in Stanislaus 
county with his threshing outfits sends us a 
sample of heads of rye showing the way the 
hoppers go for rye in the stack in the neighbor- 
hood of Turlock. The heads show many of the 
hard kernels half eaten by the hoppers, as 
though bitten off by mice. The insects seem to 
know very well that the grain is better than 
the chaff. 



The Kern county Caii/ornian says: Ac- 
counts from all quarters show that the arsenic 
remedy for grasshoppers is working splendidly. 
A visitation from them next year nesd not be 
feared. It is now demonstrated that it is 
neither difficult nor expensive to protect crops 
from them. 




pACIFie RURAL* p>RES 



[July 18, 1886 



around after him, even though he beat death's 

door?" 

With hurried words, Jennie told her story, 
ending with an account of the letter she had 
ust received, in which Addie had expressed the 
deepest contrition for the past, and had given 
the assurance that pecuniary troubles alone had 
prevented her brother from openly avowing the 
affection which he had cherished for Miss 
I.oring. 

"He is desperately ill," read the letter, "and 
I believe he will surely die unless you come to 
him. He knows no one, but calls for you con- 
tinually. Oh, come, and pray < iod that all 
may yet be well. From this time forth, I de- 
vote myself to the task of endeavoring in some 
measure to repay him for his never-failing 
kindness to such a selfish being as I have been. 
I entreat you, unless you are indifferent to my 
brother, to come." 

Mr. Loring frowned his disapproval of the 
whole affair. Even the mother looked unsym- 
pathetic. It was preposterous for their gifted 
daughter— their ouly child and heiress — to 
think of throwing herself away on the book- 
keeper of a little store in Shandon, however re- 
fined he might be. She might almost as well 
marry their coachman! 

So they argued the matter with her, and 
when reasoning produced no effect, for the first 
time in their lives commanded her to think no 
more of this unfortunate young man. It was a 
severe trial to both parents aud child, when 
none but loving words had ever before passed 
between them; but Mr. Liring would no! take 
bis daughter to Shandon aud place her in the 
arms of the impecunious Charles Merrick. 
Tears and entreaties proving of no avail, Jennie 
astonished her parents by stoutly dec'aring that 
if they would not go with her, she should go 
without them; she was not hard-hearted 
enough to let people die when she could do 
alight to save them, and if her own father and 
mother didn't care enough for her to do what 
would make her happy, she didn't know as she 
was in duty bound to obey all their behests — 
she was "2"2 years old! This was the "uukindest 
cut of all;" both parents hastened to say that 
the happiness of their child had always been 
paramount to all other considerations, and that 
they were acting for her future welfare when 
they refused to take the quixotic step she so 
rashly urged. 

"You can have no possible objection to 
Charles," Jennie maintained, "except his lack 
of means, and that you can easily remedy. 
Don't misunderstand me — he is very proud, aud 
will accept no charity, but if his life is spared 

t : you miv put him in the way of success. You 
knitting a sock of soft wool, in anticipation of . * , J » . . i . ' c u u 

8 ' v netd some one io take charge of ymir branch 

the cold days to come, while her eyes rested store papa) an(1 Charles has an excellent, busi 
frequently upon the face of the one for whom I ness education; his father was a merchant. 



The Aisles of Pain. 

The temple of God is fair and high, 
Its altar builded of hope and sigh. 
To heaven its corridors lead the way, 
And ere we reach them we must pray 
In the aisles of pain. 

To the stars uprise its spires of gold 
From the mists of the ages dark and old, 
When the heads of kings in the dust bowed dow n 
And yielded scepter and yielded crow n 
In the aisles of pain. 

And we who pass through the lonely night 
From (he depths of gloom to the walk ol light, 
Must kneel in the dust as lowly down, 
And give up pleasure and honor's crown 
In the aisles of pain. 

The aisles of pain are darkened with tears, 
And stained with the blood of cruel years, 
And the shiver and moan of crime and death 
Go up to God w ith each throbbing breath 
From the aisles of pain. 

The martyrs walked in the olden days 
With bleeding feet through the narrow ways. 
And we who follow must wait as they 
For the hand of Christ to lead the way 
Through the aisles of pain. 

We may mock at pleasure and mock at pain, 
And our lives may vanish in sun or rain; 
Yet soon or late in the silent years 
We must kneel in sorrow and walk in tears 
Through the aisles of pain. 

Fannit Jsahtl SkrtrUk, 

Selfishness Unveiled. 

(Continued from lift week.) 
Iu the handsome library of a tine residence in 
Fayville, on the evening after the repentant 
Addie posted her letter, sat a gray-haired man 
reading his daily paper. A comely matron, in 
a low chair on the other side of the table, was 



her work was intended. The night was warm 
and scarce a breath of air came through the 
open window. All was quiet within; even the 
noise of the streets seemed subdued and drowsy. 

"Where's Jeunie to-night?" queried the 
gentleman, at length, laying down the paper 
and looking around the room. 

"I don't know, I'm sure," his wife replied; 
"she must be somewhere around, for she hasn t 
gone out." 

Rising and advancing to the door of the hall, 
Mrs. Loring called, "Jeunie, Jennie, where are 
you? Why don't you come down?" 

"In a minute, mamma," replied a sweet 
voice, and soon a soft rustle of drapery was 
heard, and a little figure clothed in white ap- 
peared in the doorway. It hesitated a moment 
and the head drooped, as if in avoidance of the 
bright light that tilled the appartment. Then, 
with an impetuous movement, she flung her 
arms about her father's neck and, standing just 
back of his chair, laid her soft cheek against 
his furrowed one. 

"Papa," she said, coaxingly, "it's stteh warm 
weather, and you know you're all tired out — 
you said so the other day. I)o take a vaca- 
tion." 

"A vacation, hey?" patting the pretty face. 
"Well, I might think about it — don't suppose 
it would do any of us any hurt. Where would 
you like to go?" 

"To Shandon, papa." 

"Why, my dear," interposed Mrs. Loring, 
"you've just made such a long visit there — i 's 
only a little over two monihs since you came 
home." 

"Kut I want to go again — " 

"Jennie, you've been cryiug," exclaimed Mr. 
Loring, suddenly bringing her around where 
he could obtain a full view of her face. "What 
is the matter?" 

"Everything is the matter, papa, and I want 
you to help nie." Tears tilled the blue eyes and 
rolled down the pale cheeks. Mrs. Loring 
gazed in amazement at her cherished daughter. 
Whatever in the world was there for Jennie o 
cry about? 



Promise me, at least, that you will make his 
acquaintance, and help him if you like his ap 
pearance. He need not know that our visit to 
Shandon has any connection with him." This 
Mr. Loring at length consented to do, and early 
the next morning they all took their departure, 
ostensibly to escape the heat of the crowded 
city. It was soon learned that Charles was 
s ill delirious, and Jennie at once sought his 
sick room, the doctor declaring that his only 
chance of recovery lay in the soothing influence 
that her presencj might possibly exert upon 
him. For several days she scarcely left his 
side; he had not a conscious moment, but the 
sound of her voice, the touch of her baud 
quieted and pleased him, and he fretted if he 
missed her for a moment. 

The crisis of the fever arrived and the sus 
peiise of those slow-passing, dreary hours when 
people spoke in whispers and stole about on 
tiptoe, was almost unbearable. At last the 
heavy slumber was broken — the brown eyes 
opened languidly and gazed up into the blue 
ones brimming with tears, that bent above 
them. "Jen -nie," the pale lips faltered, "my 
darling !" 

"Hush, dear, do not talk now. Drink this 
and rest. I am with you." The tired spirit 
asked no more. Jennie was with him. She had 
called him "dear" — she bade him rest — he was 
content. In five minutes he was sleeping as 
sweetly as a child, and Jennie with her face 
buried iu the coverlets, was giving way to a 
paroxysm of emotion. Addie Merrick, seated 
on the other side of the couch, was no less 
overcome as she heard the doctor's quiet tones 
assert that her brother was now in a fair way 
to recover. 

As soon as Charles awoke to a full conscious- 
ness of the situation, Jennie was seen no more 
at the home of the Merricks. In vain he im- 
plored, through Addie, for a visit, however 
brief. Not until he was able to walk over to the 
Andersons' did Jennie meet him again. There 
he was introduced to Mr. and Mrs. Loring, and 
to make a long story short -it was not many 
days before they felt their hearts warming to- 



the governess of an old friend's children, re- 
taining her situation until induced to leave it 
for a home of her own, her conscientious, lady- 
like demeanor having attracted the brother of 
her friend as her previous selfish and arrogant 
ways would never have done. Our beloved 
Emerson said; "Whether this work be fine or 
coarse, planting corn or writing epics, so only it 
be honest work, done to thine own approbation, 
it shall earn a reward to the senses as well as 
to the thought. The reward of a thing well 
done is to have done it." 



'Oh, papa! oh, mamma!" cried Jennie, clasp- ward him, as they observed his manly counte- 
ing tight her father's hand in both her small nance and the nobility of his sentiments. One by 
ones; "how can I tell you!— what will you oue their objections faded away, until at length 
think! liut there's somebody in Shaodon lying | Mr. Loring became as anxious to secure Charles 
at death's door that I 1-love with all my heart, j for his branch establishment as he had previ- 
and I know that he loves me—" [ ously been determined not to have any connec 

"He! exclaimed the father and mother in ! tion with him. The position was so delicately 
unison, offered that Charles could only accept with de- 

"\es, yes, it is so, aud I can't help it. and, light, and resolve to leave no stone unturned to 
oh, I'm afraid he 11 die and never know I care merit Mr. Loring's confidence. What need to 
for him, fori treated him shamefully, l'apa, if prolong the tale? Charles and Jennie were 
you love me, you 11 start right off to morrow, married, of course, and "lived hapnily ever 
On, he may not be living now." after." Mr. and Mrs. Loring, as the years 

"Are yon engaged to this mysterious 'he ?" passed on, congratulated themselves on possess- 
demanded Mr. Loring, somewhat sternly, ing so fine a son in-law. Addie Merrick, al- 

"N-no, papa." though urged to make her home with the young 

"Then, what business have you chasing couple, steadfastly refused to do so, but became 



Tramps. 

IWriUen fur RURAL Pres.-. t>y Mks. J Hilton.] 

In this part of the country we do not have 
servants to talk about when we meet together, 
but as a rule we have the wea'her and tramps. 
Newcomers keep the "state of the weather" 
topic always fresh, and the tramps themselves 
keep up their part of the programme. I won 
der often if [ am very ferocious looking, as I 
always receive such respectful treatment from 
them, and I think we have entertained at least 
one every two weeks for the five years we have 
lived in this house. The most of them come 
and quietly ask for something to eat — "just a 
piece of bread;" others say, "can I do some 
work for you, madam, for something to eat?" 
I think I never troubled but two to do anything 
for me, their sudden adveut generally driving 
everything needed out of my head. One of the 
two insisted on chopping me some wood. I 
could not find an axe but he hunted around 
and found one with a broken handle, and 
chopped up quite a pile bsfore he came in to 
partake of the plentiful breakfast that I pro 
vided for him when I saw him working. The 
other spaded up a long flower bed and did it 
well, going off happy with the lunch I pro- 
vided for him in a paper sack. 

One day, an Irishman "just from Nevada, 
sure, would like a bite of bread; faith and I shall 
get plenty ma'am when I get to me brother's at 
Sin Luis." When told that I had none baked, 
he wanted a potato and he could bake it by 
the roadside — "me and my companion," giving 
a little jerk of his thumb over his shoulder. 
Looking beyond him I saw a young fellow 
hiding behind a tree. 1 happened to have 
some very large ones, weighing at least four 
pounds apiece. So I brought two of them and 
a small piece of bacon. You should have heard 
his jolly laugh when he saw the potatoes. 
"Faith and they will make a grand male for 
two min; thank you, ma'am." 

Another wanted work so as to get a little 
money as he wished to go to Lis Angeles. So 
when work was given he proved quite commu 
nicative aud told of his travels, and of what he 
considered an insult offered him at the next 
town from here. As he was going to the house 
the dogs came barking towards him aud he held 
out his cane before him to ward them olf, and 
he was surprised to hear a voice asking w hat he 
meant by striking at the dogs. "Such impu- 
dence I never saw, aud when my hus- 
band is not at home, coming here in that 
style aud striking iny dogs." "I was so in- 
dignant," he said, "I told her that as slit was a 
woman I would not talk to her. 'I want you to 
understand, madam,' I said, 'that you are talk- 
ing to a gentleman iu the guise of a tramp.' She 
was so thunderstruck that she went into the 
house and I came away." This was his version 
of the affair. 

The next one was an elderly man of decent 
appearance, and when asked what he wanted, 
as he stood by the gate, timidly asked for 
something to eat and some warm coffee to take 
the chill of the fog from his body, and he would 
do any work set him for the same. Now I can 
be brusque enough to a young man, but when a 
decent old man comes, my heart iiielts within 
me. So I gave him food and when I replen- 
ished his cup with coffee he was so thankful, 
and as I went to take the empty plate and cup 
after his repast, he held to them and with a 
glance of reverence upwards he said: "May 
God's blessing rest on you and yours for your 
kindness to me," and with a bow turned away. 
The tears came to my eyes and I felt as though 
my father had given nie the blessing. 

The last one was a strapping young fellow, 
and when asked how he came to be without 
in, ..us for a breakfast, he claimed hard times and 
lack of work. After a little more talk he said: 
' 'See here, may be you thiuk it is a bore to be 
asked so often for food, but I tell you it 18 not 
very pleasant to us to have to ask. 1 tell you 
I oft*n go hungry rather than to ask." We 
never have turned but one tramp away, and his 
breath was so foul with liquor that we knew he 
must have had some money, and he was asked 
why he did not get his food where he got his 
liquor. He said: "They would not give me 
any," and he slunk off. 

A kind widow lady asked a strapping fellow 
if he knew any reason why she should work to 
earn bread for him, and he managed to stam 
mer out "No,'' and left before she could give 
him anything. 

Another lady was asked for a piece of soap so 
he could clean up before going into town, which 
was given him, and he made his toilet even to 
shaving himself after he had eaten his break- 
fast. So we amuse one another recounting our 
experiences, although it has such a pathetic side 
one can but feel sad at times at the lack of fore- 
thought displayed by so many who should be 
making homes and happiness instead of misery 
and annoyance. 

Lo* A l(ui>o*. 



Artistic Needlework. 

Needlework f6r home decoration has ever 
held a high place, and though its intrinsic 
beauty is always appreciated, its association 
with a refined and industrious woman gives to 
it its greatest charm. 

Who would not choose a sofa cushion em- 
broideried by some woman's fingers, although 
the design and its execution did not approach 
true art, rather than one made by an uphol- 
sterer of the richest brocade? 

Somehow women seem to embroider their 
love into the little rose buds and forget-me- 
nots, and whenever these are seen, even if old 
and faded, they carry an atmosphere of ilove 
with them, which constitutes the secret spell 
home exerts over us all. 

Women who are not gifted with a talent for 
the artistic, and so do not naturally choose 
such work, might take advantage of this, re- 
membering that their own efforts, though not 
excellent iu themselves, have a power to en- 
tangle Cupid's fluttering wings more potent 
far than the finest ornaments bought at the 
marts. 

Industry, thoughtfulness of others, and a 
love of the beautiful, are cardinal virtues in 
woman's character, and these are written in 
every llower and spray of her needlework, in 
every dainty knot ot ribbon, and carefully 
arranged tidy and cushion her hands have 
made, and especially in those treasured tokens 
of rememberance which she has designed and 
wrought for those dear to her. Costly mate- 
rials are not necessary to the expression of these 
attributes. The simple crocheted edgings and 
tidies made by the girls of the "work a day" 
world express the san)u ideas in a different way, 
yet with the same spell. 

To demonstrate how much a piece of needle- 
work may tell to a thoughtfui mind, an inci- 
dent may be recalled. An intelligent young 
man was spending some weeks at a fashionable 
summer resort. He entered into the gayety of 
the place with the true Bpirtof enjoyment, but 
the deeper sympathies of his nature were acci- 
dently reveafed by the sight of a dainty bit of 
embroidery left in an arbor. It lay upon a 
little work-basket containing the tiny thimble, 
scissors and tangles of floss used in its construc- 
tion. The work was ouly a piece of azure satin 
upon which were embroidered daisies in their 
simple grace, while the warmth of the designer's 
nature, seemed to be revealed by a single 
flower of the rich Nile lotus. 

Upon asking the reason why this simple 
thing interested him so much, he said, "This 
reveals to me the character of a true woman. 
She is industrious, and she finds her pleasure in 
remembering others; she is intelligent and re- 
fined, and delights in the beautiful." He gave 
her this character alone from the work before 
him, for he had never even heard of her. He 
sought her acquaintance, and though her feat- 
ures were not classical, and her form and dress 
were very unlike a Parisian fashion plate, the 
attributes that her work had revealed to him 
were truly hers, and had a spell to make the 
farmhouse, which was her home, pleasanter to 
him than the hotel where pleasure and fashion 
held court. 

In the long summer days coming there will 
be many a quiet afternoon when the cool porch 
or leafy garden nook will invite to the enjoy- 
ments of rest, and the novel, or any of the many 
kinds of needlework will offer themselves as 
companions to recreation. 

The practical, energetic woman always pre- 
fers that which is intensely real to the pleasures 
of the imagination in any form, and her choice 
will certaiuly be the latter; while those of a 
thoughtful and romantic disposition may 
choose between readiug the romance in other 
lives, or living a romance in their own. While 
she imitates the flowers around her with her 
floss, borrowing their beauty to grace her home 
or please her friends, she may indulge her hopes 
an. I weave her plans and incidentally watch 
the bees and birds, or converse with compan- 
ions. 

Do not let it be understood that the novel 
and the story are to be slighted, for good works 
of fiction are not only delightful amusements, 
but in many instances, helpful friends; and a 
knowledge of them is almost necessary to a re- 
fined and cultivated mind. Still habits of in- 
dustry are very important and should be 
assiduously cultivated; and there is no pleasan- 
ter way of doing this, and at the same time 
gratifying the love of the beautiful which exists 
in every truly feminine nature, than by means 
of constructing ornaments in needlework. 
Besides there are possibilities in it which are 
worthy the minds of genius. Vandyke's 
mother, it is said, imitated the clouds of sun 
set in her tapestry work, and her son's famous 
power was inherited from his mother's genius 
for brilliant coloring and picturesque forms. 
This work is rated as an accomplishment, which 
a century ago was one of the highest, and it is 
no less worthy that rank in the present. 

Woman always wishes to be pleasing and 
beautiful. She could not adopt means more 
conducive to this end than by engaging in such 
work, for when thus engaged she unconsciously 
assumes a hundred attitudes of grace, while her 
face wears as many expressions of animation 
and interest. Her whole being is awakened to 
a delightful succession of motions which is akin 
to music. Her work may combine all the 
brilliant colors of a tropical bird, or the delicate 
tints of the fairest flowers, the execution of 
which reveals her skill and charms her own 



July 18, 1885.] 



PACIFIG I^URAlo PRESS. 



43 



tastes and those who behold her. Her applica- 
tion to her work shows her constancy and pa- 
tience, two of the most lively characteristics; 
while her interest in it gives her a slight air of 
indifference to those around her, and she seems 
to enjoy a delight which the uninitiated in her 
art can not understand, rendering her almost 
bewitching. At the same time her mind is 
free, and she may listen and converse as well as 
though her hands were idle. Altogether when 
so engaged she becomes irresistible, and it is 
no wonder that artists have painted such figures 
among the most successful of their master- 
pieces. 

Since the days when Penelope entangled the 
heart of a warrior in her floss, love has always 
found in it a spell; and with it, often feathers 
his arrows, while he barbs them with a needle. 



The Lemmons. 

We never could bring ourselves to take such 
liberty with people as the Sacramento Bee does 
when it writes of our esteemed contributors, 
I'rof. and Mrs. J. C. Lemmon, as follows: 

Half a dozen years ago the professor lived 
upon the ranch of a relative of his in Sierra val 
ley, and was regarded by the people of that 
section as "shiftless," and a harmless crank. 
He was then unknown to the scientific world. 
1 1 is time was spent in collecting and examining 
insects and in botanizing. It is said that he 
earned a little pocket money by playing the 
fiddle at country dances. When the locust 
visitation came, destroying crops in the valley 
for several years in succession, he applied him- 
self to the study of the pests, and his thor- 
oughly scientific articles upon the subject soon 
attracted the attention of entomologists and 
brought him reputation. He has since steadily 
pursued his researches in botany and ento 
mology, and has made some important discov- 
eries of plants in Arizona. His wife was for- 
merly Miss Sarah Plummer, and kept a book- 
store in Santa Barbara. She had obtained con- 
siderable local reputation as a botanist when 
chance led the professor to the town some four 
years ago. It was a case of "two souls with 
but but a single thought," and they were soon 
made one. The book-store was quickly sold, 
and ever since the lady has been her husband's 
indefatigable companion in all his botanical 
expeditions. She has herself contributed no 
little to the general knowledge of the flora of 
the southwestern territories. The professor is 
genial in manner, always bubbling over with 
fun, and unassuming as a boy. He is of an 
airy, grasshopper build, with long legs and a 
restless activity that carry him over a great 
stretch of country in a day. It takes a smart 
woman to keep up with him. In a few years, 
by dint of unwearied devotion, to his favorite 
pursuit, he has risen from poverty and obscurity 
and now enjoys as a scientsit a national reputa- 
tion that places many good positions at his 
choice. 

The moral of this little sketch is that it is 
never safe to think a man a crank unless you 
are quite sure you know more than he does. 



Chaff. 

He flies through the heir wi h the greatest of 
fees — the lawyer. 

Filial devotion — A man in Troy has written 
a defense of Mother Eve. 

Sober passenger (angrily): "Look where you 
step, man!" Tipsy passenger (apologetically): 
' Y yes, I do; the tr-trouble is to — hie — step 
where I look." 

Among the items in the Indian contracts 
awarded last week were 81 dozen pie plates. 
Verily it is easier to exterminate the red man 
with pie than to kill him with kindness. 

"The matter is, that the rotten thing is full 

of moths, you miserable " " 'Mots!' do 

you say?" indignantly interrupted the dealer. 
"Mots! Vat do you egspect to vind in a seven 
dollar overgoat? Humming pirds." 

Carlyle wrote: "To-day is not yesterday." 
Probably the great philosopher conceived this 
beautiful original thought while sitting* on 
the bed in the morning, yawning as though 
trying to swallow the room, and feeling his 
head to see if it was small enough to fit his hat. 

The coachman and the chambermaid were to 
be married in September. One day they were 
having a small sized lover's quarrel in the back 
yard and he kicked a ham nearly off the dog 
standing near them. 

"Don't kick that dog," she exclaimed 
angrily. 

"Don't worry about the dog," he replied, 
"just wait till I get you." 
The match is off. 



The Money We Spend and What For. 

The figures, which an exchange siysare facts, 
are startling and humilating: 



Home and Foreign Missions $5,500,000 

Public Education $85,000,000 

Sugar and Molasses $155,000,000 

Boots and Shoes $190,000,000 

Cotton Goods $210,000,000 

Sawed Lumber $233,000,000 

Iron and Steel $290,000,000 

Meat $303,000,000 

Bread $505,000,000 

Tobacco $600,000,000 

Liquor $900,000,000 



"Y'OUJ^G jEfoLKS' C[0LUJVIN. 

Baby's Story. 

[Written for Rural Press.] 

Editors Press: — As you are printing stories 
from young folks 1 will send you one from our 
baby, who is four and one-half years old. He 
has a mania for telling romances of his own com- 
position, but he only cells them to me, as the 
others laugh at him so. Some times he gets 
them very well connected, so I send his last 
one, told just as we had gone to bed. 

The Giant and the Boy. 

Once there was a little boy and he had met a 
giant and a bear, and he shook hands with the giant 
and asked him to let him have a ride, and — and the 
giant asked him "can you drive? " and he said yes; and 
the giant got off the horse and let him ride, and when 
they got to the river he said, "Thank you, giant;" and 
— and the giant kissed.him. I Wasn't he good? Then 
the little boy got a lot of hsh at the river and took 
them to his papa and his papa was real glad — now 
lei's go to sleep. 

I do not know what suggested it to him, but 
as it was rather odd I got up and wrote it 
down . 

Los A lamos. 



The Story of a Watch. 

A baby was presented on the day of his birth 
with a curious and valuable watch, which he 
was never to part with as long as he lived. It 
was different from all the clocks and watches 
in the village where he lived, yet it was a verit 
able time keeper, beating a peculiar time of its 
own. It possessed, strange to say, the property 
of giving warning on certain occasions, like the 
alarm bell which some people hang at their bed- 
heads to rouse them at the approach of burg- 
lars. 

As the child grew, his watch (which he kept 
in a special left-hand pocket provided for it) 
was friendly enough to notify him if he ran up 
or down stairs in too much of a hurry or played 
ball too energetically. It sounded almost 
like a human voice, and would jump about 
wildly in its little pocket, scolding, and saying : 
"Too fast ! Too fast ! Too Fast 1" 

When the child was so silly as to eat more 
dinner than was good for his small stomach, the 
watch ticked out in great disgust: "Too 
much ! 7'oo Much '. Too Much !" 

Thus it was with every improper line of con- 
duct that he pursued. 

You will begin to think that it was truly a 
watch worth its weight in gold — but there was 
something about it more curious still. If the 
child fell ill and a physician was sent for he 
could tell from the ticking of the watch just 
where the trouble was and all about it. I 
forgot 1 o mention that the chain of this ingen- 
ious watch was worn under the child's jacket 
and sleeve, and the end of it came out at the 
wrist — the visible end of it I should say, for 
there were delicate continuations of it extend- 
ing even to his finger-ends. Such a strange in- 
fluence was exerted by the watch ovr its chain 
that the latter shook and trembled with sym- 
pathy whenever the former was disturbed, and 
the physician, by simply putting his finger on 
the end of the fine, delicate chain (which was 
of a dark purplish-blue color), could learn just 
how fast or how slow the watch was ticking, and 
whether it was going faster or slower than was 
good for the child. 

When the boy became a man he took great 
pleasure in rowing a boat. From indulging 
moderately in this amusement he grew to liking 
it more than was beneficial, and would work so 
hard at it that the little watch was terribly 
shaken up in its wheels and springs and got 
quite out of patience. Sometimes it almost re- 
solved to strike work altogether, it found so 
much to contend against, and at last in rowing 
for a prize he worked so hard that he fell back 
in the boat ard the watch stopped forever. 

The lesson is that we should always heed the 
warnings of the watch which is given us by 
the Creator, and both in the body and in the 
affections keep the heart right, ^for it is the 
heart which does all this for us. 



The Little Cooks. 

It was "sugaring time." The sap dropping 
fast from the bright tin spouts, the big sheet- 
iron pans sending up clouds of fragrant steam, 
brooks dashing, crows cawing and squirrels 
darting about. 

It is a joy just to be in the woods on such a 
day, and Dolly and Daisy, the ten year- old 
twins, had hurried through their "stents" on 
purpose to go to the sugar place. The last of 
the "ten times round" had been knit on the red 
stocking- legs, and now for a jolly time in the 
woods where father and brother Joel were 
gathering sap and boiling. 

"But be sure you come home by five o'clock," 
said their mother. "Your father has his watch 
with him." 

Arrived at the woods, the girls found busy 
times. The sap was running fast, and would 
probably run all night the men said. They 
were crowding it into the pans as fast as pos- 
sible, and Joel had been over to the Corners, 
cross lots, and got two more men to help gather 
the sap and sit up all night to boil it in. 

The girls stayed their allotted time at the 



woods, enjoying every minute of the fresh air 
and sunshine, drinking the sweetest sap they 
could find and hunting the driest banks for 
spring flowers. At last they started for 
home. 

"Tell your mother there'll be two men extra 
to supper," was their father's parting message. 
"We'llbe down about six o'clock." 

When the girls came in sight of the house a 
wagon was standing before the door with Bub 
Sanders holding the horse, and just as they 
reached the house their mother came out to get 
into the wagon. 

"I'm so glad you've got home, girls," she 
said. "Mrs. Sanders is worse and Bub has come 
for me. You'll have to get supper the best 
you can. I laid out to make some cream 
biscuit, the bread is so near gone, but it'll have 
to do. Be good girls. Good-by." 

The girls never thought to tell her about 
the two extra men to supper. 

"It's just as well we didn't", said Dolly. 
"She'd worry like everything. There ain't but 
awful little bread, and I'm going to make a 
johnny-cake." 

"Can you ?" asked Daisy. 

"I guess so; I've seen mother make 'em lots 
of times." 

"I'll make some mush !" cried Daisy. "Father 
and Joel both love mush and milk, and so do 

Then both girls went to work in good earnest. 
But much they knew about cooking. 

Dolly's johnny-cake was made and put into 
the oven to bake and she was watching Daisy 
sift meal for the mush. 

"Oh, my I" she cried suddenly,"! forgot to 
put any soda in my johnny-cake !" 

She opened the oven door, hauled out the tin 
of dough, just beginning to bake, and put a tea- 
spoonful of soda into the exact centre of it. 

"I expect it'll spread round in the baking," 
she said. 

Dolly set the table, while Daisy stirred and 
stirred her mush. She didn't forget to salt it, 
but she hardly boiled it at all, and when six 
o'clock came, with four hungry men from the 
woods, it was a queer supper they found. 

But Dolly and Daisy had done their best, so 
nobody found any fault. — M. C. W . B. 



(£>OOD J^EALTH. 



Baths and Bathing. 

The utility of ba hing frequently cannot be 
doubted. It would be difficult to convey in a 
limited space a sufficiently complete idea of this 
most powerful means of preserving and restor- 
ing health. No wonder the ancients, and es- 
pecially the Romans, carried the practice to 
such an extent. Why it should have fallen into 
disuse in modern times it is difficult to deter 
mine, and the more so, as it is such an agreeable 
remedy and preventive of disease, by lessening 
and regulating the heat of the body and the cir- 
culation of blood, tranquilizing the irritability 
of the nervous system, and especially of cleans 
ing the skin, thereby removing a primary source 
of disease. It invigorates the whole system, 
and to an increase of bodily strength it adds ex- 
hilaration and a delightful serenity and cheer- 
fulness of mind. 

We make no attempt to establish a dogmatic 
system to persuade readers that they will find 
in water a universal remedy, acting in some 
mysterious manner. We have only to refer to 
the elementary teachings of physiology for a 
-knowledge of the uses of water in the animal 
economy. 

It enters the blood vessels, both by being ab- 
sorbed from the mucous membrane lining the 
digestive passages when taken as a drink, and 
by permeating the skin in baths. Happily 
there is no dissension to the fact of the great 
benefit arising from the use of water in the form 
of baths. This is a point on which doctors do 
not disagree. It cannot be doubted that a regu- 
lar and judicious use of baths is a preventive 
of many diseases; that they have cured many 
diseases is well known, and it is highly prob- 
able that many forms of serious and distressing 
sickness, with which many persons are afflicted 
during a long course of years would be almost 
unknown among us, and the pain from incur- 
able diseases greatly mitigated were baths 
in general use. There would be less suf- 
fering, more cheerfulness and vivacity, and 
greater length of days, and a more complete 
enjoyment of existence. 

All medical science tends to establish this 
proposition, that whatever the cause of disease 
may be, the most effective preventives art those 
which regard the body only, irrespective of the 
external circumstances of climate, atmosphere, 
vicissitudes, miasmi localities, contagion, etc.; 
and if the body is properly guarded, the abodes 
of the most frightful diseases may be visited 
with irregular impunity. It is because the 
body is neglected that it does not better resist 
the morbific actions of external agents, and be- 
comes diseased. Like a complicated machine, 
which, if exposed, soon becomes clogged with 
dust, and thus compelled to discontinue its 
movements unless constantly guarded against 
impediments, the human body needs constant 
attention — much more than a mere artificial ma- 
chine — since of all organized structures it is by 
far the most complicated. — Exchange, 

Cancer and Epithelioma. — Cancers vary in 
structure, depending much upon the part at- 
tacked by the disease. There are different 



kinds of epithelioma. The cancer van 
deemed malignant; other forms may be p.ti 
but not dangerous; they are called beniijt , 
though they may grow and become very incon- 
venient. Epithelioma, as its name implies, af- 
fects the epi helial tissue which lines the 
mouth and the whole intestinal canal. The 
case of General Grant is regarded as an epithe- 
lioma of a malignant type. Strictly, a cancer is 
always malignant; it may be hard or soft; in 
the latter case it is deemed more active, there- 
fore sooner accomplishes its dread work. A 
local cancer, one that is due to injury or irrita- 
tion in a particular part of the body, may be 
cured if treated early in its existence. Cancer 
due to hereditary taint is practically incurable. 
A tumor may appear in one locality and by 
judicious treatment be removed, and apparently 
cured; but the disease is likely to appear some- 
where else before long. Tumors of one kind or 
another are very common, and often frighten 
people, who think they are cancerous. Com- 
paratively few tumors are really cancerous. On 
their first appearance, especially if they be soft 
and have rapid growth, they should be exam- 
amined. Habit and nervous conditions have 
more to do with cancerous disease than most of 
us suspect. — Science of Health. 



X)o^iestkb QeojNiojviY. 



Acid Frpit Drinks. — Pour boiling water on 
mashed cranberries or whortleberries. When 
cold strain and sweeten to taste, or stir a table- 
spoonful of any acid jelly or fruit syrup into 
one tumbler of ice water. Jelly and Ice — Chip 
half a cup of ice into bits as large as a pea. 
Mix it with about the same quantity of lemon, 
currant, blackberry or barberry jelly. This is 
very refreshing in fevers. Baked Lemon- Bake 
a lemon or sour orange twenty minutes in a 
moderate oven. When done open it at one end 
and take out the inside. Sweeten with sugar 
or molasses. This is an excellent remedy for 
hoarseness. Irish Moss Lemonade — Soak, pick 
over and wash one-quarter of a cup of Irish 
moss. Pour on one pint of boiling water. 
Heat to the boiling point, but do not boil, and 
keep it at that temperature half an hour. Strain 
and squeeze into it the juice of one lemon or 
enough to give an acid taste. Add lactart in 
place of the lemon if preferred. Wine Whey — 
Boil one cup of new milk and add one cup of 
wine. Let it stand on the back of the stove for 
five minutes. Strain and sweeten the whey. 



Indian Trifle. — Take one quart of milk, 
the rind of one half a large lemon, sugar to 
taste; five heaped teaspoonfuls of rice Hour, one 
ounce of sweet almonds and one-half a pint of 
custard. Boil the milk and lemon rind to- 
gether till the former is well ttivored; take out 
the lemon rind and stir in the rice flour, which 
should first be moistened with cold milk, and 
add sufficient loaf sugar to sweeten it nicely. 
Boil gently for about five minutes and keep the 
mixture stirred; take it off the fire, let it cool a 
little and pour it into a glass dish. When cold 
cut the rice out in the form of a star, or any 
other shape that may be preferred ; take out the 
spare rice and fill the space with boiled cus- 
tard. Blanch and cut the almonds into strips, 
stick them over the trifle and garnish it with 
pieces of bright colored jelly, or preserved 
fruits or candied citron. 

Young Wipe's Podding. — Take 4 eggs, 2\ 
ounces of sugar, a small pinch of salt, the peel 
of 1 lemon, 1 pint of milk, and stale bread. 
Beat the eggs up lightly for five minutes, add- 
ing the pounded sugar by degrees, and the salt; 
beat the mixture well and acid the lemon peel, 
stir in pint of cold milk, and then pour the pud- 
ding into a well-buttered dish. Cut some stale 
bread in slices rather more than a quarter of au 
inch thick, and, with a very small cake-cutter 
cut from it enough rouucls to cover the top of 
the pudding; butter them thickly, lay them 
upon the pudding with the buttered side upper- 
most, sift sugar thickly on them, and set the 
pudding into a slow oven. Bike one hour. 
This is a simple but very nice pudding. 



Snowed Eggs. — Beat to a still' froth, with a 
little pulverized sugar, the whites of six eggs. 
Place on the fire a pint of fresh milk which has 
been sweetened and flavored to taste. When 
the milk boils, dip out the beaten egg in table- 
spoonfuls and drop these, one at a time, into 
the boiling milk, taking them out as soon as 
they become set, and arranging them upon a 
large dish in such form as fancy may suggest. 
Now remove the milk to one sids of the fire, 
and as soon as it becomes a little cool, stir in 
the yolks of the eggs, adding the latter very 
slowly and a lit le at a time. As soon as the 
sauce becomes thick, pour it round the snowed 
eggs. The dish should be served hot. 



Spinach. — Pick over, trim ofl the roots and 
decayed leaves ; wash thoroughly, lifting the 
spinajh from one pan of water into another, 
that the sand may be left in the water, and 
changing the water until it is clear. Put the 
spinach in a large kettle without water. Place 
it on the stove where it will cook slowly until 
the juice is drawn out, then boil until tei.der. 
Drain and chop fine. For half a peck of spin- 
ach add one large tablespoonful of butter, half 
a teaspoonful of salt, and a quarter of a salt- 
spoonful of pepper. Heat again and serve on 
toast. Garnish with hard-boiled eggs. 



44 



pACIFIG RURAL* fRESS. 



[Jor.Y 18, 1885 




A. T. DEWEY, W. B. EWER. 

Published by DEWEY & CO. 



Office, 252 Marht St., N. E. cor. Front St., S. F. 
tr Take the Elevator, No. It Front St. -S4 

Address all literary and business correspondence and 
drafts for this paper in the name of the firm. 



Our Subscription Rates. 

Our Subscription Rates are three dollars a year' 
□ advance. If continued subscriptions are not prepaid in 
advance, for any reason, fifty cents extra will be charged 
for each year or fraction of a year. MW No new names 
placed on the list without cash In advauce. Agents wanted. 

Advertising IJates. 

1 Week. I Month. S Months. I Year. 
Per Line (a*ate|.... | .25 $.80 $2.20 $ 5.00 
Half inch (1 squa re). 1.50 4.00 10.00 24.00 

On« inch 2.00 5.00 1 4.00 45.00 

Large advertisements at favorable rates. Special or read 
Ing notices, legal advertisements, notices appearing in extra 
ordinary type, or in particular parts of the paper, at special 
rates. Four insertions are rated in a month. 

Our latest forms go to press Wednesday evtninij. 

Entered at the S. F . Post O thee as second-class mail matter. 



SCIENTIFIC PRESS PATENT AGENCY. 
DEWEY ft CO., Patent Solicitors. 

A.T. DEWET W. B. EWER. O. n. STRONG. 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

Saturday, July iS, 18S5. 
TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



EDITORIALS. -The Poison Oak; The Character of 
Silk Culture, 37. The Week; The English S|arro» ; 
Produce Gambling and Its Results; A Good Time to 
Subs(-ril>e; Australian Trade, 44- The Signal Serviee, 
40. Ohoniargarine in other States; Sulphuring Citrus 
fruits: Reclamation of Marsh Laud in California, 45. 
fossil Elephants in California, 49- 

I LLC S T K A TIO N S. - - The Poison Oak ,37. I )iagram 
showing Sluice Gate .Most Serviceable in Salt Mash Re- 
clamation, 45. 

ENTOMOLOGICAL. The Cottony Cushion Scale; 
Grasshoppers and Rvc, 41. 

OORKESPONDENCE. To Oregon by Wagon- 
No. j; The Fourth on a Mountain Top, 38 

THE STOCK YARD. Holsleins on the Pacific 
Coast; An Avrsbire Record, 38. 

PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY.- The Iluel Grid- 
I. > Fund; Co. operation in Productive Enterprises; San 
Jo^c Notes: A Great Grange Exhibition, 40- 

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE. -Iiecav of Organic 
Bodies, 38. 

HORTICULTURE. The Future in Fruit; Black 
berries. Now and old; The Mvrobolan Root, 39. 

AGRICULTURAL NOTES — From the various 
counties of California, 40. 

THE HOME CIRCLE. -The Aisles of Pain; Selfish- 
ness Unveiled; 'frames: Artistic NeeJIework, 42- The 
I.enimons; Chaff; The Monev we Spend and What For, 
43. 

YOUNG FOLKS' COLUMN. Baby's stor.; The 

Storv of a Watch; The Little Cooks, 43. 
GOOD HEALTH. -Baths and Bathing; Cancer and 

BpftheUoma. 43. 
DOMESTIC ECONOMY. -Various Recipes. 43. 

Business Announcements. 

Agricultural Implements— Baker & Hamilton, S. F. 
Agricultural Implements— Truman, I sham & Co., S. F. 
New Music— Oliver Ditson & Co., Boston, Mass. 
Assessment Notice— Grangers' Business Association. 
I.and for Sale— J. !>., Napa Citv, Cal. 
Land to Let— E. K. Dewey, Tuiare City, Cal. 
Fruit Ranch- D. J. Parnele, Vaeaville, Cal. 
Land for Sale -Arthur W. Bull, 8. F. 
tWSee Advertising Columns. 

The Week. 

We are having a strong touch of solar might 
this week. The trade winds seem to have tired 
ol their regular labor and there is nothing to 
mitigate the fervency of the direct rays of the 
sun. The city pavements dash back the heat 
and light fiercely into the faces of pedestrians, 
and we imagine that the interior planes are well 
nigh red hot. The heat along the coast will be 
acceptable to some, at least, for the season has 
been cool and the night damp has been heavy — 
so much so that some little hay has been lost 
by rotting. 

l'erhaps there are no items of telegraphed 
news which are looked for from day to day more 
than the reports concerning the severe battle 
which (!en. Crant is waging with the insidious 
foe which is destroying his life. He is now at 
Mt. McGregor, in Xorthern New York. His 
voice is gone, and he suffers great pain, no 
doubt, but he is still strong and resolute, re- 
sisting the "last enemy" with his characteris- 
tic courage. From all parts of the country 
there come continually messages of sympathy 
and condolence, and it must be a true consola- 
tion to the old hero to have such unmis- 
takable evidence of the warmth of affection for 
him which fills the hearts of his countrymen. 



Bl death of Professor Norton of the State 
iNormal School, Myron Yager, Superintendent 
of Public Schools of Tehama county, becomes 
president of the State Teachers' Association. 



The English Sparrow. 

Since we received the favor of our San 
Leandro correspondent, making out a character 
for the English sparrow, we have hardly taken 
up an exchange without seeing statements of 
the injuries inflicted by the bird upon the 
agriculturist. We are well aware that the sub- j 
ject is not a new one, but has filled several 
volumes. One which we now remember had 
an excellent colored plate of the marauder, so 
that people might recognize and slay him wher- 
ever found. Personally, we are favorably dis- 
posed toward the bird, for he is sprightly and 
saucy and an agreeable companion in village or 
town where he finds plenty of food without 
trespassing, but when he goes abroad into the 
fields and orchards, he does work unworthy of 
him. He tires of bugs and becomes frugiverous 
and graminiverous to a degree uncomfortable 
to the farmer. For this evil he has to be 
classed with our California linnet, a charming 
bird, but a great pest also. 

As the subject has been brought forward 
prominently, we shall add a few testimonials to 
the character of the Knglish sparrow which have 
come to our notice during the last few days. 
Sparrows (writes the Xorth British Advertiser) 
were introduced into the United States from 
F.ngland for the purpose of destroying the ver- 
min, but ithas been determined that the remedy 
is worse than the pest, and a resolution is made 
to get rid of the birds, but how to do it has not 
been fully determined. Perhaps it will be a 
good plan to introduce the mouse-eating spider, 
for it is exceedingly fond of small birds, and is 
as artful as a fox in catching them. This form- 
idable insect is found in Bahia, a maritime 
province of Brazil. Its body, which is covered 
with hair, is three inches in length, and its legs 
are in proportion; so that, when extended, it is 
about as big as a cheese-plate. It feeds on 
mice, grasshoppers, and small birds, which it 
catches by springing suddenly upon them from 
ambush in the hollow of a tree or beneath a 
large leaf. We have not much confidence in 
this method of getting rid of the sparrow. It 
is said the|tarantula falls into insignificance when 
compared with this beast from Brazil. Tar- 
antulas are good enough for us. 

We read in the Adelaide Observer (South 
Australia) a letter by John X. Birks, in which 
he says ten pairs were let loose in that colony a 
few years ago, and now they have probably two 
millions, "not spread over the colony but 
crowded in the settled districts, for they feed 
almost entirely on the fruit and grain produced 
by cultivation. They are now busy picking oil 
all the almond fruit buds as they swell, and I 
suppose the peach, apticot and plum will be 
attended to in due course. Should any buds be 
spared the sparrows are early in their attention 
to the ripening fruit, and the grain before ready 
for reaping will be cleared by them. In the 
sparrows we have an enemy far worse than the 
red rust, locusts, or Russians, and what with 
the favorable climate, the absence of natural 
enemies, and the immense breeding-grounds in 
the ranges, my impression is that unless some 
effective remedy is found the whole colony will 
in less than '20 years be reduced to a mere sheep- 
walk." 

The same journal, Adelaide Ohserrer, has an 
editorial article of two columns length, given 
wholly to recounting the evils wrought by Kn- 
glish sparrows. Of course we cannot give the 
bird the benefit of such a long notice, but we 
may say that he is specifically charged with 
eating sunflowers, stripping whole fields of 
wheat, running out pastures by devouring the 
seeds of annual grasses and other forage plants, 
ruining gardens by eating peas, cabbage, and 
even going for succulents, even geraniums and 
(save the mark) even cactus. They can tell 
poison as far as they can see it; they have no 
fear of stuffed owls or cats or traps, kill off 
song birds, and "chatter to such an extent as to 
nearly drown all other noises." These are a. 
few of the compliments lavished upon them by 
our cotemporary. The following extract will 
suffice to end this matter: 

There is scarcely a fruit-grower along the 
valley of the River Torrens who does not com- 
plain bitterly of the damage done to his crops 
by the sparrows, and many of them estimate 
their losses at fully half of the total quantity 
that would otherwise have been gathered. It 
is pitiable to see whole rows of vines entirely 
stripped of their grapes, and the rest of the 
table fruits so damaged as to be unsalable, and 



it is next to impossible that so many growers 
should be so unanimous and so bitter in their 
complaints and yet have no foundation of truth 
for their statements. Mr. J. F. Pascoe, a lead- 
ing city fruiterer, declares that he has not seen 
a decent fig for some years, and .the grapes and 
other soft fruits brought in are almost invari- 
ably more or less damaged through the attacks 
of the sparrows. In fact, with very few excep- 
tions, all the fruit-growers upon the plains and 
very many of those in the hills complain bit" 
terly of the losses suffered through the intro- 
duction of the sparrow. 



Produce Gambling and its Results. 

One of the results of the general business de- 
pression has been in the Fast to seriously affect 
the various speculative exchanges and the value 
of memberships therein. The value of seats in 
some of them has fallen to one-third of what it 
was not long since. The disinclination of "out 
side" people to deal in margins in the New York 
Produce Kxchange has left brokers with few 
orders, and they are compelled to deal on their 
own accounts. They are beginning to think 
there are too many members. 

It seems that the people are thinking that 
gambling is not very profitable business for 
them. The gambling in mining stocks here 
which used to be indulged in by all 
classes of people, is now confined among those 
who cannot give up the idea of gaining sudden 
riches by this means, or those who, having 
money, can afford to speculate. But so many 
people on this coast have received severe prac- 
tical lessous about dabbling in business out of 
their control that the speculative exchanges in- 
terest them no more. 

Of course there are certaii. people who will 
| speculate, come what may; and as a nation we 
are somewhat given to it. But it seems that 
all over the land the impression is gaining 
ground that it is an expensive luxury in which 
only the rich should indulge. Certain it is that 
here at least many have become cured of the 
mania. It is as well for those of moderate means 
to think twice before launching their earnings in- 
to speculations of any kind. There are plenty of 
legitimate channels for investment, where, if 
the profits are small, the principal is at least 
| comparatively safe, and in a tangible form. 

We hj.ve often deplored gambling in stocks, 
and especially gambling in food products, be- 
cause values were thereby elevated or depressed 
without reference to the true standard of sup- 
ply and demand. The following from the New 
York Eferald is pertinent to the general subject 
and the present situation: 

There is now an unusually large stock of old 
wheat, and the speculators rely on the necessi- 
ties of farmers compelling early selling of 
wheat, even from a deficient crop, to keep up 
this large visible supply until late in the season. 
By that time most of the available sliort crop 
will be out of farmers' hands, and the specu- 
lators can then advance prices for consumers 
without fear that anybody except themselves 
will reap the benefit. 

It is sometimes urged in behalf of the specu- 
lators in food products that in the end they do 
not change the result. They only anticipate by 
a little the prices which laws of supply and de 
mand would fix. Whenever a real shortage of 
any product exists prices must sooner or later 
advance. If there is an excess prices must go 
down. This is true, as even speculators often 
find to their cost. But the power of men able 
to control unlimitedcipital is much greater than 
to merely anticipate inevitable changes in the 
markets. They can by judicious management 
entirely reverse the natural order of things and 
thus reap a double profit. Thus now, when by 
universal consent wheat is a short crop in 
Kurope, with a smaller yield in this country 
than for several years, speculators are able to 
hold the wheat market down so as to compel 
the producer to sell at lower rates than have 
ever prevailed in seasons of abundance. Wheat 
is now, atf it has been for months past, cheaper 
than it has been before in nearly one hundred 
years. 

There is just one way in which speculators in 
wheat, who are now depressing prices to get the 
new crop cheaply, may be caught in their own 
snare. .Let the farmers generally refuse to sell, 
at least until prices pay at fair profit on a good 
crop. It is not to be expected that the thou- 
sands of farmers who will harvest only '2 to 10 
bushels per acre will get prices that will pay 
them for seed and labor; but they should at least 
get what would pay expenses on a crop of 20 to 
.SO bushels. If they do not do this with a pros- 
pectively better foreign demand for wheat than, 
for the last two years, they should stop grow- 
ing a crop in which, by these facts, it would ap- 
pear tli it other countries can undersell us. 
But the decreased acreage in other parts of the 
world shows that the prices of wheat have been 
unremunerative nearly everywhere. 



A Good Time to Subscribe. 

To whomsoever, not already a subscriber of 
the Rural PaiSS, this notice may come, we 
would suggest that it is a good time to add your 
name to the many which are now being placed 
upon our list of readers. The new volume has 
but just opened. It promises to be a volume 
of unusual interest and value. The subject of 
California agriculture is continually expanding 
and unfolding and disclosing new problems 
which are of wide and deep importance. The 
only way one can keep abreast of the times is 
to read and think and experiment— to receive 
the results of the thought and experiment of 
others and weave them into the fabric of one's 
own thought or work. The more people we 
can get down to earnest, honest effort in this 
direction, the better it will be for them and for 
all. This is true of industry everywhere, and 
especially of agriculture everywhere; but 
nowhere is the truth so vital as in the 
agriculture of California, where, struggling 
with the new conditions and new materials, 
producing and developing a market for the dis- 
position of the product, the producer who does 
not read and think and experiment, will wake 
to find himself far in the rear in the race for 
prosperity and success. The subjects which 
are coming up in our columns from week to 
week, full of novelty and importance, plainly 
show that old things and old ways, old ambi- 
tious and expectations, are rapidly becoming 
obsolete. It is a good time now, for all who 
have not enrolled themselves as readers and 
thinkers in the agricultural line, to send us 
their names at once, and receive the Rural 
from the beginning of the present volume. 

We have promise of many contributions on 
topics of pressing importance in all branches of 
our work, and we desire as many more. Who- 
ever enters the Rl kai. circle is welcomed as an 
active participant in our etforts for the advance- 
ment of our agricultuie in general in the indi- 
vidual prosperity of all engaged in it. Our 
idea is to secure the fullest co-operation among 
our readers toward the attainment of desirable 
ends, which cannot otherwise be secured. 

Australian Trade. 

It is currently reported that the Pacific Mail 
Steamship < oinpany contemplates withdrawing 
its line of steamers plying between San Fran- 
cisco and the Australian ports, and will make 
no contracts for freight or passage after the 
first of November next. The alleged reason 
for this promised action is the decision of the 
U. S. Postmaster-General withdrawing the sub- 
sidy for mail contracts, and similar action on 
the part of the Australian governments. It is 
stated that Australian mails will reach England 
via the Suez canal only two or three days later 
than if sent via San Francisco, and therefore 
the Australians are not warranted in paying 
the old subsidy, especially as the withdrawal of 
the United States bonus indicates that our Gov- 
ernment does not propose to share longer in the 
support of the line. The steamship company 
therefore proposes to withdraw the ships be- 
cause the business will not pay for running the 
ships. They say that the last steamer, with a 
capacity of ."v.OOO ons, only brought in about 
86 tons of freight. They will put the steimera 
on the China line, which has a good business. 

These are the facts as reported, whether they 
present the whole truth of the matter or not, 
or whether the threat of withdrawal is made to 
accomplish some purpose we do not know. It 
seems quite apparent, however, that the stop- 
page of quick communication with the Aus- 
tralian colonies would work most harm to our 
producers and merchants. While we buy but 
very little of the Australians they buy consider- 
able of us, and the trade has of late been con- 
siderably increasing. They are taking large 
quantities of agricultural produce. The ship- 
ments of apples and onions are large. The 
company states that all available space up to 
November 1st is taken for these two articles. 

Whatever may be the inner plans of the 
steamship company, it is evident that it would 
work a hardship to certain lines of our agricul- 
tural produce to have quick transit stopped. 
Our progress and prosperity lie in keeping all 
lines of transportation open and opening new 
ones. We cannot well afford to lose the Aus- 
tralian market, and we trust that before the 
first'of November arrives there ihay be reasons 
found for the coutiuuance of the regular steam- 
ship communication. 



Joly 18, 1885.] 



f ACIFI6 RURAL* fRESS. 



45 



Oleomargarine in Other States. 

The opponents of false dairy products are 
waging quite an active campaign for midsum- 
mer. On Monday of this week the new law 
against selling the material without license, or 
without branding it with its true name, went 
into effect. The governor of Colorado has ap- 
pointed H. L. Feldwisch, State Dairy Commis- 
sioner, to enforce the law which places a license 
of $1,000 on manufacturers and importers, and 
$500 on dealers. "The term 'dealers' might, in 
its broad sense," says Mr. Feldwisch, "be made 
to include all who sell the article, whether 
wholesale or retail, but after consultation with 
Governor Eiton, he has concluded to construe 
the word in its commercial sense — that of whole- 
sale dealers. The small dealers, under this 
view, can sell oleomargarine without a license, 
but they mus'. sell it as oleomargarine." The 
Colorado Farmer says the Legislature neglected 
to make appropriation to carry out the law, 
'■>jt the dairy commissioner proposes to go to 
work nevertheless, and trust to the next Legis- 
lature to foot the bills. 

Oregon has scored its first victory against 
false butter vendors. Readers will remember 
our allusions to the arrest of an offender about 
two months ago. The matter finally came to 
trial and Wm. Danbar, a merchant of Portland, 
was, last week, after a full 
and fair trial by jury, con 
victed of having violated the 
oleo. law. This is the first 
conviction under that law, 
and it is to be hoped that 
this will serve as an exam- 
ple to all who have been c r 
are still inclined to disobey 
this law. The sentiment of 
the producer as well as the 
consumer demands a strict 
enforcement of the law in 
this matter, and it is to be 
hoped tha 1 ; dairy commis- 
sioner W. W. Baker will fol- 
low up the advantage gained 
in this first onset. 

In spite of the setback 
which the new New York 
law received at the hands of 
the Court of Appeals, as de- 
scribed in the Rural of 
July 4, the dairy commis- 
sioner acting under that law 
last year accomplished a 
great deal for the butter in- 
terest. His report, issued 
before the decision by the 
court, states that the first 
legal proceedings were 
brought against retail deal- 
ers, who, tempted by the 



holders. Lately the concern has been doing 
little or no business, as the laws of this State 
prohibit the manufacture and sale of imitation 
butter, and a large number of suits have been 
brought against the concern for violation of 
these laws. To prevent the executions of the 
judgments, to the detriment of other creditors, 
the company was placed in the hands of a re- 
ceiver last Thursday, Roscoe Conkling figuring 
among its creditors for $11,075 for professional 
services in arguing the unconstitutionality of 
the anti-oleomargarine laws before the courts. 
Last January the indebtedness of the concern 
was $140,000, now it is supposed to be double." 

This was written before the decision by the 
Court of Appeals, but it shows how money and 
legal talent were linked to secure the result de- 
sired by the makers of the bogus product. 
Probably the best safeguard of the legitimate 
producers now is to hedge about the sale so 
vigorously that the manufacture will not be 
profitable. That can be done by such efforts as 
we have described as now in progress in Colo- 
rado and Oregon. 

Sulphuring Citrus Fruits. 

A Florida orange grower gives the public, 
through the Florida Agrieu'turM, what he 



Reclamation of 



Marsh 
t'ornia. 



Lanls in Cali- 



Iu the Rural of May 30th we announced 
that there had just been issued from the De- 
partment of Agriculture at Washington a 
special report on the "Tide Marshes of the 
United S Sates," by D. M. Nesbit. The docu- 
ment contains interesting and important infor- 
mation concerning reclamation enterprises in 
all parts of the country, and California efforts 
are described by those who have figured largely 
in them, using the term in a financial sense and 
otherwise. In our issue of May 30th, we gave 
the reports made by E. F. Smith, James Strat- 
ton, John A. Stanly and T. H. Williams, re- 
serving the careful statement of John W. Fer- 
ris, of Stockton, until we could procure the en- 
graving which accompanies it. This important 
contribution to the general knowledge of Cali- 
fornia reclamation enterprises we present here- 
with : 

Oar marshes consist of alluvial deposit, with 
occasional intermixture of peat. They are over- 
flowed at spring tides only, before reclamation. 
The surface of the land, therefore, is a few 
calls : "Florida's Future Fixed — The Great | inches above ordinary high-water mark, and 5 



Secret Made Public." We are glad Florida's 
future is fixed, because it is inconvenient to 
have a future wandering around, but to call 



feet above ordinary low water. The highest 
storm tides rise 26 inches above the average 
level of the land on the creek banks. 




DIAGRAM SHOWING SLUICE GATE MOST SERVICEABLE 



MARSH RECLAMATION. 



tion butter to their customers. After a few 
convictions of retail dealers wholesalers 
were attacked: and finally several manu- 
facturers were indicted for making bogus 
butter and compelled to stop work. In all, 67 
arrests were made, 1 1 convictions secured and 
four cases discharged between September and 
January. The rest of the 67 cases were still in 
the courts, but many are probably now thrown 
out by the court decision against the prohibit 
ory feature of the law. As for the results of 
the campaign, the Assistant Commissioner for 
New York and Brooklyn, Mr. B. F. YanYalk- 
enburg, reports that over 75 per cent of the 
sales of spurious butter, as compared with 1883, 
were suppressed in 1884; that the reduction of 
sales now (Jan. 1885) amounts to 50,000 pounds 
daily; and that the price of butter has been fav- 
orably affected, notwithstanding the receipt of 
7,000,000 more pounds of butter in the New 
York market than were brought in in 1883. 

There can be hardly any doubt that recent 
events have been decidedly adverse to the oleo- 
margarine interest. The vast amount of money 
which is arraigned against the honest industry 
cf the dairy may be learned from the following 
from the Rural New Ycrker: 

"The anti oleomargarine laws of this State 
have proved disastrous to the Commercial 
Manufacturing Company of this city, until 
lately the largest manufacturer of oleomargar- 
ine in the United States, and probably in the 
world. The company was incorporated in 1876 
for the express purpose of turning out imitation 
dairy products in unlimited quantity. Its con- 
solidated capital stock was $10,000,000 and its 
f actor or agent the firm of Thurber & Co., of 
this city, who were said to be the largest stock- 



great profits to be made, were selling imita- j what he tells a "great secret" is what we can- 
not accept. The secret is merely to subject 
oranges to sulphur fumes to kill the fungus 
germs and thus prevent rotting and insuring 
long shipments in safety. This is not new be- 
cause it has been done by California growers, 
and it is not a secret because it has been pub- 
lished in the' Rural Press and the State of 
Florida might have had her "future fixed" some 
time ago by subscribing for our paper ($3 per 
annum in advance). However, this is the so- 
called "great secret :" 

Every shipper has or should have a packing 
house suited to the requirements of his grove, 
to care, pack and ship his fruit from. In that 
house should be long, shallow, slatted troughs, 
with sullicient capacity to hold at least one 
shipment. In these troughs the oranges should 
be poured when gathered to go through the 
usual sweat before boxing, the houses being 
made tight, with or without Moor. 

At night, before closing the door, or doors, 
place a pan of "live coals" about the center of 
the house, upon which drop one tablespoonful 
of sulphur, and then immediately close the 
door so that the fumes may not escape. Open 
all the doors about sunrise next morning so as 
to admit the fresh air and dry off the sweat. 
In a few hours the packing may begin. The 
process works no harm whatever to the fruit, 
but kills the animalcule that causes it to rot in 
transit. 

A full description of the California way of 
sulphuring, as practiced by A. B. Chapman, of 
San Gabriel, may be found in the Rural of 
December 27, 1884, with a description of some 
lemons which had then kept four months with- 
out sign of decay. The advice given to the 
Floridians is good — the objection is in having 
as secrets things which have already been 
public property in [ regressive fruit regions 



.The dikes, or, as locally termed, "levees," 
are always constructed from material excavated 
from the marsh. Two reasons forcibly deter- 
mine the location of the levee outside the spoil 
ditch, first, the ditch when dug of sufficient 
depth forms the main drain of the intake, con- 
necting by flood-gates with the outer creeks, 
ami fed by smaller subsidiary drains running to 
it; second, the newly-cut surfaces of the ditch, 
if outside of the levee, are immediately bur- 
rowed by myriads of small crabs that work in 
the limit between high and low water. 

Levees built of material excavated from the 
marshes, which is necessarily surcharged with 
water, are found to crack very much at dry 
seasons. To obviate leakage the surfaces re- 
quire to be kept well harrowed. This is only 
possible on a slope of three base to one elevation, 
and three to one slopes are therefore correct, 
where wave action has not to be resisted. The 
hieht should not be less than two feet above 
highest water mark, and the crown, if given a 
width of 8 feet, may be used as a roadway. All 
growth and rubbish should be removed from the 
front portion of the levee base, but it is not 
found desirable here to break the ground sur- 
face. 

The best form of sluice-gate is that which, 
from its construction, offers the least frictional 
resistance to the flow of water from within, 
provides sullicient resistance to the hydrostatic 
pressure from without, and offers proper ob- 
struction to the passage of water, over, under, 
or alongside it. Well-selected timber will be 
preserved by the salt, and is therefore quite suf- 
ficient without necessitating the cost of masonry. 
The teredo does not affect the timbers in the 



upper part of the bay. None but galvani, 
spikes and nails must be used, as unprotected 
iron rusts out in about four years. The accom- 
panying diagram shows side view and ground 
plan of the gate I find most serviceable in the 
salt marsh. Its cost, including setting in site, 
is a little under $200. The water-side gate is 
automatic, and on the land side is placed a 
"dead" gate to close down in case of accident 
to the swinging gate or flume. 

The points of excellence claimed for this 
form of gate are (a) the gradual narrowing to 
the flume proper, which is made as short as 
practicable, {b) the proper Aire to the outer 
apron to reduce in best possible manner the 
velocity of water discharging through flume 
and avoid the cut which would otherwise be set 
up over the front edge of apron, (c) absence of 
projections in aprons and flume by which eddies 
are set up and efficient discharge greatly di- 
minished. 

The greatest possible care should at all time 
be taken in the setting of these gates to avoid 
leaving spaces around the plane timber surfaces 
for the passage of water, and the sheet-piling 
must also have joints carefully broken with the 
same object in view. 

Automatic sluice-gates vent the water in a 
perfectly satisfactory manner; further complica- 
i tions, such as siphons, pumps, &c, are there- 
fore unnecessary. 

There are no muskrats in 
California. The gopher, or 
pouched rat.has a predilection 
for levees, but very moderate 
carefulness prevents any seri- 
ous consequences. No iron 
plates or other means of any 
sort are necessary to prevent 
burrowing, provided always 
the levees be of proper size. 

The average cost per cubic 
yard of constructing levees 
on salt marshes in California 
is 10 to 12 cents. The aver- 
age cost per acre for dik- 
ing or leveeing, subsequent 
draining, filling the smaller 
creeks that have to be crossed 
by the plow, the first break- 
ing of the land, and other 
similar expenses that are 
chargeable to capital account, 
is about $25 per acre. 

Marshes should be plowed 
as quickly after reclamation 
as the ground becomes solid 
enough to carry stock, and 
before the inevitable crack- 
ing, that the shrinkage of 
the soil in drying induces, 
has gone very far. Shallow 
plowing for the first year is 
preferable, say to a depth of three or four 
inches, the surface growth being removed 
before plows are started. Summer-fallowing 
for the first crop is good practice, as the 
furrow will then easily work down the en- 
suing fall. Rye, oats, and barley are the best 
first year crops, a most important point to ob- 
serve being to sow early and get the full benefit 
of the winter's rahi3. Kich subsequent year 
the plowing is a little deeper, and three or four 
years should show eight or nine inches of well 
pulverized soil, mellow and easily worked, free 
from any excess of salt, and able to show good 
results. 

Hay grown on (reclaimed) salt marsh will be 
preferred to any other as soon as consumers be- 
come familiar with it, the salt it contains mak- 
ing it so palatable to stock that much less is 
wasted than of other hay.* 

All water-logged soils are affected by drought, 
and for the first year or two after reclamation 
marsh lands will necessarily be so affected. As 



drainage is perfected and the soil thoroughly 

*A sample of such hay was examined by Dr. 
Richardson, assistant chemist of the Department of 
Agriculture, who reports as follows: 

' 'A portion of the hay was burned and found to 
contain chlorine i.o3 per cent. 

"I have never found a larger amount in but three 
grasses, and Wolff gives but three with higher per- 
centage. 

"A portion treated with water for a minute allowed 
the greater part of the chlorides to dissolve, and 
chlorine was found in the water extract, i.oo; ex- 
tracted hay, .17; total, 1. 17. 

" The chlorides, therefore, are readily soluble. 1 
should hesitate, however, to conclude that they were 
therefore merely physically a mixture with the hay, 
and should prefer to accept the idea that the pure 
ash of the hay was actually in itself rich in these 
salts." 



40 



fACIFie RURAb f RESS. 



[Milt 18 1885 



comminuted and pulverized, the land becomes 
vary much less subject to injury from drought 
than upland. 

The ultimate application of these lands is un- 
doubtedly pasture— the three or four years 
general farming after reclamation being simply 
with the aim of getting the land in suitable 
condition for sowing grass seeds. Reclaimed 
salt marshes in Holland, England, in fact the 
world over, are the best beef-produciug lands 
known, and experience in California marshes 
shows that when properly reclaimed, drained 
and put in thorough cultivation before laying 
down to pasture, the land may be relied on to 
carry one head per acre, and where the water 
is not so brackish as to permit flooding for irri- 
gation in . I une, as is the case generally with 
land in the north bay of San Francisco, consid- 
erably better than this will be done. Perennial 
rye grass serves admirably, and is as good a 
grass as can be deeired. 

Reclaimed marshes will at first be readily 
sodden with heavy rains, but in two or three 
years with good cultivation their absorptive 
power becomes immensely increased, and where 
sufficient floodgate area is provided no ditli 
culty is found in handling even the heavy rains 
of the coast counties. 

Salt marsh lands iu California have yet to re 
deem themselves from the stigma of uncertainty 
gained for them by early reclamations. It is 
<iuite certain, however, that the problem of 
their reclamation is one of the simplest, and this 
fact is fast becoming recognized. There is here 
no "unknown factor" to deal with: the greatest 
known flood hight is but two feet over ordi- 
nary high tides; tb • material is perfect and 
the foundation gf od. These facts will speedily 
dispel the prejudice existing amongst capitalists 
against the marshes, and their value will be 
the amount of money they can pay fair interest 
upon. 

All marshes bearing a healthy growth of 
samphire, spear grass, or round tule, may be 
considered fit for reclamation, avoiding only 
those that are distinctly and entirely peat, 
whose growth denotes the presence of too much 
alkali, or where the deposit is too recent, as evi- 
denced by the growth of the three-cornered tule 
only. At time of reclamation marshes should 
have an elevation of five feet above low water, 
to allow, after the inevitable settling followed 
reclamation, sufheient fall for drainage. There 
ts no question as to the practicability of re- 
claiming land with less than five feet of tide 
action, but to insure sufficient water-carrying 
ability to the main drains they must have 
plenty of width. 

I have recently built a dredger for salt marsh 
reclamation, and, after carefully considering 
the requirements, designed it to cut a ditch 
'JO feet wide and six or seven feet deep. The 
material thus excavated is more than is required 
for the levee or dike, but the large ditch is a 
great consideration. The reason for this is that 
if small gates be placed at frequent intervals, 
the discharge being small at dry periods, the 
race-way in front of gate is liable to be silted 
up, and a constant expense thereby neces- 
sitated. Consequently, in leading the water a 
long distance, say '2 miles, to a larger gate, the 
ground being on a dead level, it is not possible 
to get current velocity enough in a small cut, 
and width has therefore to be depended on to 
overcom? the difficulty. The settlement after 
reclamation is always much less at the water's 
edge than elsewhere, because the greater de- 
posit here makes the land more solid. This 
settlement consequently leaves the land saucer- 
shaped, and an apparent 5-foot margin avail- 
able for drainage before reclamation will be but 
about 3 feet after cultivation, in the middle of 
the tract. 

Windmills are good as auxiliaries, but not 
safe alone; the wind has an unfortunate predi- 



lection for failing at critical times. Steam 
pumping is not so expensive as may be supposed. 
( hitside the interest, wear and tear, and depre- 
ciation of plant, the cost of pumping on a tract 
of land v. ith which I was familiar in Kogland 
aggregated only about 25 cents per acre yearly. 

Where much exposed to storms a sufficient 
foreland with its natural coarse growth will 
nearly always give sufficient protection, pro- 
vided always a sutlicient slope be given the 
lev^e on the water side. 

There are large areas of unimproved marsh 
on the bay of San Pabl > and its confluents, and 
owners are watching the results of thorough 
reclamation. 

Where attempts at reclamation have not been 
successful, failure has resulted chiefly from in- 
sufficiency of the levees, and ignoring the abso- 
lute necessity of subsequent drainage. 
The natural growth of salt marshes has some 
: little value for pasturage, only when accessible 
from an adjoining upland. 

In California the swamp and overflowed lands 
were deeded by the Federal (iovernment to the 
! State. Moat of them have since been "takeu 
up" by individuals. 

There has been no noticeable elevatiou or de- 
pression of lands along the coast so far as I am 
aware. There is a tradition that the water 
level is receding, but I can offer no opinion as 
to its correctness. 

The usual increase of malaria attending on 
j the fir.-t cultivation of a reclaimed swamp is not 
observed here, owing, doub less, to the rigorous 
' trade winds that blow from the ocean with 
great regularity during the summer months. 
One noticeable consequence of reclamation, 
however, is the comparative abatement of the 
mosquito nuisance. 

The recent decision of Judge Sawyer will not 
immediately affect the tide marshes proper, but 
will be of immense importance as affecting 
those situated farther up the rivers, where, be- 
sides simple rise and tall of tides, the flood 
water has to be handled. 



Silk Reeling. 

The State Board of Silk Culture has adopted 
the following Rules and Regulations for the 
Filature, at No. "21 Montgomery Avenue, S, F. 
Reeling was begun June 22, as previously stated 

in the Rfrai.. 

The Filature shall be open to the public daily, ex- 
cept Sundays and holidays, from 9 A. If. to 12 It,', 
and from 1 to 5 P. 11. Seven hours will be counted 
one day's work. 

Instructions will be given, free of charge, to as 
many at one time as the Commiltefcon Filature may 
deem desirable. 

No pay will be allowed to beginners for the first 
eight weeks, and after that time such compensation 
as the proficiency in the work will justify. 

The board will endeavor to make the work, to 
those who desire to learn the art of silk-reeling, as 
pleasant as possible, but reserve the right to dis- 
charge any pupils, who. in their opinion, will not 
make good reelers, or fail to comply w ith the rulc 3 
and regulations. 

All cocoons to be delivered at the Filature in a 
dried state, free of charge. 

Cocoons will be purchased by the Board this sea- 
son, at $1.40 for first-class, $1.25 for second-class and 
$1 for third-class; or, the cocoons will be reeled free 
of charge and the silk returned to the producer. 

Advances will be made on any shipment of co- 
coons, but no settlement will be made until the value 
of the cocoons is ascertained. 

As the Board is created by and obtains its funds 
from the State, the Filature is for the benefit of Cali- 
fornia, and the above rules apply only to cocoons 
raised in the State. 



Our Publishing House Visited by 
Father Upchurch. 

On July !>th the publishing house of Uewey \ 
Co., was honored by an extended visit from 
Father Upchurch, the founder of the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen, who, during his stay, 
inspected the business and printing departments, 
the model rooms and patent office. As a ine 
chanic he took a strong interest in those various 
departments of our house, and before he took 
his departure the employees of the offices, to the 
number of some .'50, gathered in the com- 
posing room to greet the venerable visitor and 
to witness an interesting ceremony, viz., that of 
planting in an earthen pot some seeds of the 
Sequoia gigantea, or "big trees of California," 
furnished by R. J. Trumbull & Co., of this city, 
which was done by Father Upchurch at the re- 
quest of Mr. Dewey. The latter's son, Master 
Alf. H.'Ddwey, will care for the young 8egucint 
and endeavor to have a number of them ready 
for distribution to some of Father Upchurch's 
friends. After planting the seeds, the "foun- 
der" made a few remarks to those assembled, to 
the effect that he was glad to meet mem- 
bers of the printing fraternity, and to perform 
the little ceremony in their presence. Three of 
his own family were printers, and he re- 
garded the art as one necessary for insuring the 
prosperity of the country. The seeds be hoped 
to see grow and flourish. 

Mr. Dewey thanked Father Upchurch for his 
presence, and for the act of founding, in the 
best of Oakland soil, a number of the giant "for- 
esters" which he trusted would grow into pro- 
portions that shali be symbolical of the great 
fraternal Order founded by the same hand. 

This pleasant visitation ended after a general 
hand-shaking. 



Commercial statistics for the first half of the 
year 1885 are now made up, and it is seen that 
notwithstanding the dull times we have done 
more business in the past six months than in 
the corresponding period last year. Our ex- 
ports of wheat in round numbers for the cereal 
year just closed we;e 15,974,001 ctls., valued 
at $'21,27S,000 against 1 1 ,'25t),0OO ctls., at 8U»,- 
147,000, in 1884. The exchanges at the San 
Francisco Clearing- House for the first half of 
1885 amounted to *273,<o4!t,000, against S207,- 
!t5!l,000 in the first half of 1884. These clear- 
ings are now accepted as the nearest guide to 
the volume of business, and they show tha' we 
have done about $5,500,000 more business thus 
far this year than in the corresponding period 
last year. True, the gain is slight, but it is 
much better than a loss. 



Norman Hukses.— Dillon Bros., of Normal, 
111., the well-known importersof Norman horses, 
write us that their first importation for this sea- 
son, eighteen choice.Norman stallions, arrived at 
their stables in Normal on the morning of Jjly 
7ch. They are black and dark grays from three 
to six years old, all in fine condition. They 
were selected by J. C. Duncr.n and are the best 
he could find in France. Mr. I'uncan, it will 
be remembered, sold some fine animals in San 
Jose last fall and winter, and we expect he will 
visit California again this year. 



City Consumption ok Bran.— In our last 
issue, speaking of supply and consumption of 
feed grains, we gave Mr. (Jove's figures for re- 
ceipts of bran. His account includes only that 
arriving by rail and sea, and into and out of 
warehouses, and does not iuclude bran delivered 
by the seven mills in the city or much of the 
Starr Mills bran. His estimate of the monthly 
consumption of bran in San Francisco is from ' 
4,000 to 5,000 tons. Mr. Campbell, of the | 
Golden Age Milling Co. puts it at 5,000 tons 
monthly, and we presume that is not far out of 
the way. 

Berkmiirkx l'hil. M. Springer, secretary 
af the Berkshire Association, reports the follow- | 
ing sales of registered lierkshires in this State: 
Andrew Smith, of Redwood City, to J. T. 
Simms, of Phoenix, A. T., the sow "Belle 
Roche" 11,050; J. S. Conner to B. D. Murphy, 
of San Jose, "Brentwood," 13,081 and "F.dith," 1 
i:i,t»84. 

An Honoramlk Proposition. — Charles Krug. 
the financially crippled wine merchant of St. 
Helena, is only legally responsible for 50 cents 
on the dollar, but he stipulates to pay 100 cents 
on the dollar in three and one-half years, giving 
his creditors half in the mean time. Mr. Krug 
is a rarity in the annals of bankruptcy.— Snrra- 
niento Bet> 



Applications f >r State Lands. 

1h; te * law which will go iuto efl'jct on the 
first of next month is as follows : 

3498. All applications, nnder whatsoever 
Act, filed in the office of the Surveyor General, 
must be retained ninety days before approval, 
and must be approved I when there is no con- 
flict) by the Surveyor-) ieneral, at the expira 
tion of six months, subject, however, to the 
provisions of Sections :!,40(i and 3,407 of this 
code, and all unapproved applications which 
have been on file over six months, wherein the 
approval has not bjen demanded, and wherein 
the contest has not been referred to court, or a 
demand made for an order of reference, as pro- 
vided in Section .3,414 cf the Political Code, 
shall be null and void. 

Sec. 2. This Act shall take effect on the first 
day of August, 1885, and the Surveyor Oenera) 
shall give notice to each applicant to be affected 
thereby by sending to Mid applicant or his at- 
torney a copy of this Act. 

80 far as possible, copies of said Act have 
been sent out from the < rfice of the State 
Surveyor-* General to the parties interested, but 
from the manner in which the records have 
been kept it is impossible for the Surveyor- 
Oeneral to know the address of a large propor- 
tion of those who hive tiled applications for 
land. For this reason <len. Willey asks the 
publication of the above law for the benefit of 
whom it may concern. Correspondence on the 
subject should be addressed to H. I. Willey, 
Surveyor-t General, Sacramento. 

NOTICE - Parties Wishing local agencies ti rcprcR'nt 
our Nurneriix fur the sileof nurstoi k.uiil please addren- 
J. Li sk & Sun, Box !), Xortli Tcmemal, Oakland, Cal. 



Robust Health 



Is not 11 hv ay- cn.ioyeu by those who seem 
to possess it. The taint of corrupted 
blood may be secretly undermining the 
constitution. In time, the poison will cer- 
tainly show its effect*, and n it bull the more 
virulence tin- longer it lias been allowed 
to penm ate 1 he system. Each pimple, *ty. 
boil, skin disorder and sense of unnatural 
lassitude, or languor, is one of Nature's 
warnings of tin- consequences of neglect. 

Ayer s Sarsaparilla 

ts the only remedy that can be relied upon, 
11, all eases, to eradicate the taint of hered- 
itary disease and the special corruptions 
of the blood. It i* tile only alterative 
that is sufficiently powerful to thoroughly 
cleanse the system of Scrofulous anil 
Mercurial impurities and the pollution 

of f*Wlll mJllllS Discuses. It also neu- 
tralizes the poiSOUS left bV Diphtheria 
:md Scarlet Fever, and enables rapid 
recuperation from the enfeeblement and 
debility caused by these diseases; 

Myriads of Cures 

tebjeved by Ayfii's sausapauilla, in 
the past forty years, arc atu Mted, and there 
i* no blood disease, al all possible of cure, 
thai will not yield to it. Whatever the 
ailments of this eiaM.aud wherever found, 
from the BCUrV) of the Arctic circle to the 

"veldt-sores" of smith Africa, this rem- 
edy has afforded health to the sufferers 
by whom if was employed. Itruggi-'* 
evi rywherecan cite numerous cases, with- 
in their personal knowledge, of rental k- 
abk) cures wrought by it. where all other 
treatment had been unavailing. People 
v ill do Well to 

Trust Nothing Else 

than Avi K's * u.'svr ueii.t.A. Numerous 

crude mixtures are offered to the public 
us "blood pu fitters j" which only allure 
the patient with the pretense of many 
c heap dose*, and with which it i* folly to 
experiment while di-ca*e is steadily be- 
coming more deep-seated and difficult of 
l ine. Some of these mixtures do much 
lasting harm. Bear iu mind that the only 
medicine that can radically purify the 
^ itiated blood is 

Ayer's Sarsaparilla, 

mrr wtr.i> BY 

Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Sold by all Druggists: Price $1; 
Six bottles for £5. 




"NEW HOME" 



Leads all Others in Sales and Popularity. 

GIVES LESS TROUBLE. IS MORE SATISFYING. 

THE MOST ATTRACTIVE FOR DEALERS TO HANDLE. 

For Terms Aiiiikk's : 

GEO. H. ROOT, 
Manager 

PACIFIC COAST. 



The New Home Sewing Machine Co, 

Nos. 108 and 110 POST STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL- 



h3 



Best 


Stand, 


Best 


Feed, 


Best 


Shuttle, 


Best 


Attachments, 


Best 


Woodwork, 


Best 


Wearing. 




July 18, 1885] 



f ACIFie RURAb PRESS. 



Lands h gale apd Jo Let. 



VALUABLE FRUIT RANCH 

In the earliest portion of the Vacaville Fruit Belt FOR 
SALE, consisting of 50 acres of the choicest of hill land, 
situated five miles norta of Vacaville, with plenty of 
wood, well und spring water. There are over 2,000 trees, 
2, 3, 4, and 5 years old, of the most valuable of table 
fruits, selected with especial referenci to this locality, 
consisting of Apricots, Peaches, Plums, Pears, Nectarines 
and Figs in variety; also 10 acres of t"b!e grapes, 6 acres 
in bearing, and a few tree? of Apples, A'monds, Cherries, 
Quinces, Olives, Persimmons; and one-half acre of B ack- 
herries ©f two kinds— early and late. The Fruit was all 
selected with a view to succession in ripening, extending 
about six months, and always brings fancy prices, on ac- 
count of extreme earliness. The income will pay 10 per 
cent on ?3n,000 In two years. ( In the place is one small 
nearly new house, and b rn with packing sheds and out- 
buildings and necessary tools for working t'.e place 
Cause for selling, poor health For further information 
aldrejs D. J. PARNELE, 

Vacaville, Solano Co., Cal. 



STUDEBAKER BRO.S M'FG CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF AND DEALFRS IN 



240 ACRES 

(Foothills), fi miles from liapa, lj mi es from Nai'A Soda 
Springs. Splenaid vie x, healthy and free from frosts. 
About 2j or 30 acres tillable land, balance pasture, with 
timber and living springs. About It) acres Vineyard and 
Orchard. Modern built hou-e, large barn, wagons, stock, 
tools, etc. Hunting and Fishing in the vicinity. Als5, 
SOO acres of unimproved land in San Luis Obispo County. 
Price, $0,00(1. Address 

J. D., P. O Box 27, 

Napa City, Cal. 

FRUIT LAND FOR SALE. 

1 will sell Ml acres, or less, of rich, irrigated Fruit Land, 
near town of Fresno, at *40 per acre. Time if required. 

ARTHUR W. BULL, 
123 California St., San Francisco. 

240 ACRES OF LAND, 

Five Miles from Yolo Station, for $6,000 

Twenty-three and oie-half Standard Bushels of 
good milling Wneat per acre, just har- 
vested. Terms easy. Apply to 

CLAUDE V. BURKE, - - Yolo, Cal 



e. h tucker, 
Land Broker, 

MAIN STREET, 

Selma, Fresno Co., - California 

A BARGAIN. 

WE OFFER FOR SALE 80, 160 or 320 acres of Choice 
Land. Soil rich chocolate colored gravelly loam; all 
cultivated, located in the foothills, south of and over- 
looking the town of Livermore. Will sell cheap to 
an immediate purchaser. Apply to or address 

McAFEE BROS., Land Agents, 
234 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

FRESNO COUNTY REAL ESTATE. 

SEEK A HOME in one of the best agricultural 
regions of the Pa ific Coast -Fresno County, in the 
lamous San Joa<|Uin Valley, the acknowledged fruit and 
vine-growing region of California. 

Lands in all sized tracts. Water, for irrigation, in 
abundance. Colony system great success. Address 
S. N. GRIFFITH, 

Fresno City, Cal. 

2, 506| ACRES OF GOOD LAND. 

One-third Farming Land, balance good Vine, Fruit and 
Pasture Lands, in Monterey County, 40 miles S. W. from 
SolecVd: part of the Milpitas Ranch. A living stream 
runs two miles through the land, and several fine springs, 
•lolon stage station is on the ranch. Price, *10 per acre. 
Terms, | cash, balance in one year at 7 per cent. For 
iurther particulars apply to 

T. ELLSWORTH. 
22 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 




FIRST-CLASS CARRIAGES, BUGGIES AND WAGONS 



Send for C.italoguc. 



WAREHOUSK, S. W Corner ) 
(7.'>,340 feet.) Gtli & Kiug Sts f 



(office and 201 & 203 e a n Cpa nricrn Pal 

( SALESROOM, Market St., OOII r I dlll/IOl/U, V»Ol. 



CHEAP LANDS FOR SALE IN SAN LUIS OBISPO CO. 

575 Acres of Choice Fruit Land 

Wi hin six miles of the celebrated Paso Robles mineral springs and near the proposed railroad from San KrancUeo 
and San Luis O dspo. Abiut one-fourth is valley, balance oiling land. No irrigation needed, as the rainfall is 
sufficient. No better climate in the State; being '20 miles from the C jast, is free from the told fogs and bleak winds 
which prevail near the coast, and of the intense heat of the interior valleys. Price, 810 per acre. IIer« is an op- 
portunity to buy ten acres of lind for the pi ice asked for one acre in Santa Clara valley, wir.h a better soil and better 
climate than can be found in Santa Clara or Napa va'leys. t 

Adjoining the abive I have a stock ranch of 1,400 acres, covered with bunch grass and altiliera, the most 
nutritious of all native griss.s. On the bottom land is clover and blue-joint grasses. A stream, with running water 
the year round, i asses t 'rough it. Plenty of oak trees on both of ths pieces for fence posts and fuel. Price, SS per 
acre. Part of the pin chase monev can remain for two and three vears. 

AMOS ADAMts, 110 N nth Street, San Francisco. 



30,000 ACRES TO LEASE FOR 

1 to 7 Tears. 

Splendid grazing Lands, of which 1,500 acres arc good 
agricultural lands, being a portion of the Milpitas Ranch, 
Monterey County, watered by the San Antonio River, 
also by Mission Creek and several never-failing springs, 
well timbered and on the stage road. Climate delightful; 
15 cents per acre. For further particulars applv to 
T. ELLSWORTH, 
22 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

LAND FOR SALE. 

Five Hundred and TVenty-five (525) acres, 5 miles of Fel- 
torj Depot, S. P. C. It. R., SyutaCruz Co., on Ben Lomond 
Mountain ; 2 commodious dwelling-houses, 2 hams, out- 
houses, black smith shop, poultry-yard, 20 acres fruit-trees 
bearing, 20 acres viueyxrd, 80 acres open fanning land, bal- 
ance heavy timber, r<dwood, oak, etc. Abundant supply of 
water; fine water in house from reservoir. A good mill site. 
$80 per acre. Terms liberal. 

P. PETERSON, Santa Cruz, Cal. 



i_,.A.:isr:D. 

In 12 Best Californian Counties. 

For descriptive price list of desirable Ranches, Farms, 
Vineyards and Californian Real Estate generally, apply 
to 

HENRY MEYRICK, Real Estate Exchange and Mart, 
Santa Cruz, Cal. 



This paper is printed with Ink Manufac- 
tured by Charles Eneu Johnson & Co., 600 
South 10th St., Philadelphia. Branch Offi- 
ces - 47 Rose St, New York, and 40 La Salle 
St., Chicago. Agent for the Pacific Coast- 
Joseph H. Dorety, 69.9 Commercial St. S. F 



PACIFIC MACHINERY DEPOT. 

H. P. GREGORY & CO., 

2 & 4 California St., San Francisco, 

Importers and Dealers in all kinds of 

MACHINERY. 

ENGINES AND BOILERS 

On Hand from 2 to 100 11. P. 
Threshing Engines. 

Primps of all kinds, from the 

ORCHARD SPRAYING PUMPS 

To the Largest Class of 

IRRIGATING PUMPS. 

Saw-Mills, Wood and Iron Work- 
ing Machinery. 

THE EQUITABLE GAS MACHINE. 

Something thai every farmer ought to have in his 
house. Cheaper than Kerosene or Candles. .Safe, 
Simple, and KrHclent. 

43*Kknd for DEScmmvK Catalcoik. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Grangers' Business Association (A Cor- 
poration. — Principal place of business, No. 108 Davis 
street, in the City and County of San Francisco, State 
of California. 

NOTICE is herein given that at a meeting of the Di- 
rectors of said corporat.'on, held on Wednesday, the 
eighth (Sth) diy of July, 1*85, an assessment (hemg the 
0th installment of stock) of five (6) per cent, amounting 
to one dollar and twenty-five cents per share, was levied 
upon the eap'tal stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately to Charles Wood, the Secretary of the corporation, 
at his office, li« Davis street, in the City and County of 
San Francisco. Any stock upon which the assessment 
shall remain unpaid on Monday the tenth (10th) day of 
August. 1885, will he delinquent and advertised for sale 
at public auction, and unless payment is made before, 
will be sold on Tuesday the eighth (Sth) day ol Septem- 
t er, 1885, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with costs of ad\ erf i ung and expenses of s*le. 

CHARLES WOOD, Sec'v Grangers' Bus. Ass'n. 

OFFiCE-No. 108 Davis St , San Francisco, Cal. 



GRIND YOUR OWN BONE, 

Meal, Oyster Shells \ Coi n in the 

HAND MILL 

(F. Wilson's Patent.) lOO 
per ct. more made In keeping I'oultrv. Also Power 
Mill* and Farm Feed .Wills. Circulars and testi- 
monials sent on application. WILSON BROS. 
EASTON, Penna. The Pacific Coast supplied by 

HAWLEY BROS. HARDWARE CO., 

•rtu *a309iOJJKKI£T St. San Frnncinco. Oil. 




The Only Perfect Insect Eradicator 

CLIMAX SPRAY PUMP, 

F"r all kinds of Fruit Trees. Vines, Shrub', and all 
plants in any way infested with insects. A galvanized 
iron can. Capacity, 6 gallons; 3 feet best rubber hose. 
Brass pump with only metal valval that cannot te affe t- 
ed by cheinica's, while the Climax Cyclone Spray Nozzle 
has no eipial as a sprayer. 

Thi* Pump has been recommended as superior to all 
otheis by S. F. Chapin, State Inspector of Fruit; C A. 
Wetmore, of the A'iticnltutal Society; A. T. Hatch, of 
Sonoma; and over 800 others who have made a personal 
trial of and are using this Pump. For sale by gcncril 
dealers in Hardware, Seedsmen, and at the office of the 
CAL. FIRE APPARATUS MFG CO., 
211 &--U3 CaMfornia St , San Francisco. 
.IAS. S. NA1SM1TII, Manager. 

FARMERS, ATTENTION ! 



Will & Fincrs Hdoi-Foned and HM-Finished 

SPRING-EYF NEEDLES. 

Best in the World. Ask your dealer for them. 



Dear Sir :— Having so many inquiries about prices of 
bates and County Itights, etc., I herewith give prices of 
thi? celebrated Gate: 

For a Wood Frame Gate, Wire Rod 595 n) 

For a Wood Frame Gate, Wire Rod',' Hog and Rab- 

b 't tight 3o pn 

For a Wrought Iron Plai 1 Gate 40 00 

Era Wrought Iron Plain Gate, Hog anil Rabbit 

tight 45 oo 

For a Wrought Iron Plain Gate with fancy scroll 

on top 45 00 

For a Wrought Iron Frame, filled with Marsh Wire 50 00 
For a Wrought Iron Frame, filled with Marsh Wire, 

with fancy s -roll on top ' 00 00 

For a Tubal ir Iron Plain Gate 35 00 

For a Tubular 1 1011 Plain Gate, Hog and Rabbit tight 40 60 
for a Tu> ular Iron Plain Gate with fancy scroll on 

'°P ■ ■ ■ 45 00 

For a lobular Iron Frame filled with Marsh Wire, 

with fancy scroll on top §-,0 00 to 60 00 

For Very Fancy lion Gates from $60 00 to 100 00 

In asking for prices of County Rights, and discount to 
agents, etc., it is hard to make any fair impression on any 
person who has never seen the article <hey are inquiring 
about. E\ en it I quoted the largest discount given bv 
any firm, or if I nuoted the price of County Rights to you 
almost for nothing, vet any business man would not buy 
or handle any article before viewing it, and ascertain 
what it was. 

The question would naturally follow, "Will it pay to 
canvass for this; if it does, will it pay better to buy the 
territory in which he wishes to canvass in?" Those are 
questions any business man will ask himself before he 
embarks into anv enterprise of this kind. And to place 
you on a fair basis, I will ship \ou a gate Si.OO less than 
the prices quoted. You put it up according to our direc- 
tions, and if tne gate don't give satisfaction, send it back, 
freight paid, a d I will refund you the money, or you can 
deposit v ith Wells, Fariro & Co.'s express agent the price 
of the gate, less the S5.00, subject to my order in ten days 
after receiving the gate. This will give you ample time 
to test the gate and see what it is. Should you return 
the gate, upon presenting the shipping receipt, freight 
paid, you can draw the amount from the agent with 
whom you deposited the money. 1 make this proposition 
because I know the gate will give the best of satisfaction, 
and 1 can show you figures whc'ehy you can make more 
money on the sale of this gate every year forfifteen years, 
than j ou can on the best 160 acres of land in your county. 
If vou have any desire to enter into this business and buy 
County Rights, and thoroughly canvass, I will send you 
a confidential circular giving the bed-roik figures of the 
cost of these gates, which will show vou the large profit 
there is in them, and as to the sale of the gate, they are 
easily sold, more especially where they are introduced for 
anv length of time, there is where they sell the fastest. 

For further particulars impure of vours tru'v, 

JOHN AYLWARD, 
P. O. Box 88, I.ivennore, Alameda Co., Cal. 

<S"See my oth r advertisement in this paper. 



Dr. Ricord's Restorative Pills. 

BUY NONE BUT THE GENUINE. 
A Specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces, etc. 

Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, and by 
medical celebrities of the world. Aokntb for California 
and the Pacific States: 

J. G STEELE & CO., 
635 Market St., (P-lace Hotel) San Francisco, Cal. 
Sent by Mail or Express anywhere. 
PRICES REDUCED— Box of 50, $1.25; of 100, $2.00; 
of 200, $3.50; of 400, »6.00. Preparatory Pills, $2.00. 
4»\send for Circular. 

Ritchie's Safety Attachment 

FOR HORNED AMIMALS, 

Or Bull Conqueror. 

Pat. .\pril8, 1884. Entire 
Patent or Territory for 
sale. $6 and #5.S0> per set. 
Sent to any part of U. S. 
011 receipt •( price. Circu- 
lar anil testimonials sent 
on application. Enclose 
stamp lor reply. Address 

<:i:o. W. it 11 < 1111. 
Anwwsmlth, • IltlnoN. 

OLIVES! OLIVES! 

I wish either to go in with some one, or form a com- 
pany to plant Olives extensively. 
I have many thousand fine two-year-old trees. 

W. A. HAYNE, JR., 

Santa Barbara, Cal 




TO WINE-MAKERS. 

A RARE OPPotTl NITY to purchase 150 to 200 tons 
of the finest Grapes, with the piivilege of manufacturing 
them into wine ou the premises; ce'lar and other facili- 
ties giv-n. Yen little outlay to make wine. 
ftjfVor particulars addtejs 

X., care CHAS. RHINE, 
Clayton, Contra Costa Co., Cal. 



GLADD/NG.M BEAN&C0. 



SEWER, WATER AND 



CHIMNEY PIPE. 



LINCOLN PLACER CO.CAL.&L 



^\358 MARKET ST. S.F. 




RUPTURE 



Positively cured in 60 days by 
l»r. Ilorne't Electro-Mujciietfc 
Kfit-TruHK, combined* Gnaran 
tred the only one in the world 
prenerntinj? a rontiinious Electric dt Mag 
lie cxtn-ent. Scientific, IVwtrful, Durable, 
Comfortable and EnYctiTO in curing Rup. 
ture. rricu Reduced. 500 cured in 84. Send forpamphle^. 
EL£CTRO-MA«NETI€ TRUSS COMtP'Y, 
702 Mabkft St. San FitANcifcco. 



48 



pACIFie RURALo p RESS. 



[Joly 18, 1885 



go Dollars 



(TILL Bl'V A 



Rival Wind-Mill! 



-53 A 

1 2 

« S 1 
•° =s s 

s 



Why be Without One? 



3 

. so 



— > 



S £ i 
Be?" 



PS 

s 



a> n> 

» a « 

2 °s «S 

2 «•-■ s 

3 ° § 

1 

CO 




£- 2 

QO fm* 

<j ^ H 

cr cr 

B' s: 3 

a IIP 



■ Wc have, through the solicit tloM of many of our CUB 
Comers, constructed a cheaper Mill than ti e Altluuiso. 
whi -h wc are prepared to supply at a very low figure. It 
will he fouml strong and •ervlaeable, and for ordinary 
*ork will very efficiently sural] the place of more ex- 
pensive Mills'. Its construction is simple, and it imis 
with the lightest winds. It is easily erected, being de- 
> oid of all complication Fvcry part is accurately dupli 
!-ated and extra parts, if required, can alwavs be pro 
cured. £2J'For further particular* address 
WOODIN & LITTLE 
oG9 and 511 Mariet Sireet, San Francisco 

AGRICULTURAL WORKS, 

JOHN L. HEALD, Proprietor, 

Crockett, Contra Costa Co., Cal , 

MAM tACIl RRR OK 

HEALD'S PATENT 

Wine Making Machinery. 



Is the only machinery that has given universal si'isfac- 
rion, and is to he f und in all the first-class Wine Cellars 
ia the S'ate. The Patent Crushers, Stemmers, and Fit - 
\ators, includes the elevation of tripes in boxes as well 
as loose. Capacity of large l rusher and Stemmer up to 
15 tons per hour. Hand Crushers, or Crushers and 
Stemmers that can be worked by hand, horse, or steam 
power to a capacity of 10 to SO tons per day. 

My Hydraulic Wine Press has a ia acity of four times 
that of any other press in the market, and will save from 
3'2 to $3 worth of wine at e " h pres-ing over all others. 
Wine-uiake's cannot afford to use any other press if they 
desire to save money in wine and labor. Wine Pumps, 
Pomace Cars, or any other appliance ncedid in a Wine 
Cellar, such as Boilers, Engines, Shafting, Pulleys, etc. , 
new or second-hand, for sile at lowest prices. Plans and 
specifications for Wine Cel'ars fumi-hed at lowest figun s. 

If you want the best Irrigation or Drainage Pump, call for 
"iieot "J. L. Heald's Cent rifugal," guaranteed to 
pump water at a cost not to exceed 60 cents per acre for 
irrigation, which is much cheaper than ditch water, and 
is tne only Centrifugal Pump that can be run by horse 
power. 

Get one of "Heald's Barley Crushers" if you 

want the best in the market. Capacity up to 10 tons per 
hour. It took the first premium at State Fair, 1884. 

Heald's Patent Straw -Burning Engine has 
proved itself for jcars to be the best, and took first pre- 
mium at State Fair, 18S4. 

Heald's Patent Steam Kngine Governor has 
„'iven entire satisfaction wherever used, in adding 15 per 
cent more power to the Kngine, and, with speeder attach- 
ment, enables the Engine to run at any s)>eed required, 
with the utmost regularity. This governor will main- 
tain the same speed under varying pressure or load. 



ERTEL'S 

IMPROVED HAY PRESSES. 




Bale Ten Tons of Hay a Day. 
Ten Tons to the Car. 

&DDRKS8 : 

GEO. ERTEL & CO., 

Quincy, Ills., U- S. A. 

N. B. -Any horse power bay press, whatever its name 
may be, is invited to be worked against an Ertel press, 
lor an amount of from S5U0 to $1,000 a side, the press do- 
ing the most work (10 tons to the car) with the 'east 
expense to take the money. — G. E. & to. 

SUREJEATH! 

RIIHAOH " O-N.MIIXM'S California I 
HVIinuil) Insect Exterminator. Sure death 
It all Insects and harmless to human life. A California 
production. Millions of people are enjoying its great 
usef ulness. Dirccti >ns with eac'r. package. Druggists 
and Grocers se 1 it at 25 cent". 50 cents, 75 cents, $1.25 a 
-an, and 6-pound cans at £4.50 per can. N'ever buv 
BUHACH in bulk, but in original cans, and see that the] 
ire sealed and covered by our trad -mark, as niccess will 
sot crown your efforts unless you use genuine BUHACH. 

Buhach Producing and M'f g Co., 

Manufacturers, 
154 Levee Street, Stockton, Cal. 

and §« Cedar Street, Sew York, N. V. 




The American Churn 

Excels in the art of Cliurniiig, 
Wattling. Salting ami 
Working Butter. 

THE AMKRICAX IS PKKKKCTI.Y t'YL- 
INDRH'AL IN FORM, leavintj no |M>sri : Me 
opportunity for cream to stick t<> corners (us is 
invariably the cass with other than round 
chums); thin works ea ity, r.tpiJly, aixl will not 
make stroked batter There In no par. 
i tally i'liiii-ni-d rrcan hIxmI with 
the bolter to ennfee it Mtreaked or 
i in paii- iih keeping quality, i 
daslie fuPows the railii. * uf churn bodf loostlf 
wn le the blades give the < ream a rapid c uuter 
current to and lro m .venieiit, agitating the 
cream thoroughly b ml making granular gi.t-edge 
butter in from t to 10 minutes. 

TRY AN A SI KB IC ASI 4 III It >. 
We Onaraattee Halisraelion, 

And will send on trial to respoiifihle pa ties. 
Pitu k List ok Amekk an l'iii rnk. 

No. 1 - W th legs, t« gallons * 6 00 

No 2 With legs. : gallons 8 00 

No. 3 With legs. 9 ga lous 10 00 

r*o 4 -With leg . 1*2 g lions 12 00 

No. 5 With legs, 18 gallons 15 00 

No. 6 - Power. 20 gal o 20 00 

G G. WICKS0N & CO., 

Dafttrj ami Farm Much inn* . 

38 California St., San Frauc'sco. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR 

W. W. GREENER'S BR ECH-L0ADING 

Doillllo GrUIlS. 

Kor Strength, Durability, Style, Finish and Extraordinary 
Shooting Qualities thoso Guns are unsurpassed. 

COLT. PARKER. SMITH, and REMINGTON 

XJouble Gtms. 

Champion, Forehand & Wadsworth, and 
Remington Siogle Guns. 

Winchester, Bullard, Colt New Lightning, Marlin, and Kennedy Repeating Rifles. 

BALLARD and REMINGTON SPORTING and TARGET RIFLES. 
Colt and. Smith cfc Wesson Pistols. 

AMMUNITION AT LOWEST PRICES. 

N. CURRY & BRO.. - 113 Sansome St.. San Francisco. 

Pacific Coast Agents for the Merino Elastic Felt Gun Wads. 



1885. 



1883. 



Mission Rock Grain Dock and Warehouses, 

FRANCISCO. 

Regular Warehouse for S. F. Produce Exchange Call Board. 

Storage Capacity for 75.000 Tons of Grain. 

THE CALIFORNIA DRY DOCK CO., Proprietois. 

OLIVKR ELDKIDOK. Pres., CHAS. H. SINOLAIB, Supt., W. C. GIBBS, Seey. 

I'reight pa'd, fire insuraure and loans effected, and proeeeds forwarded free of commission-. Money adianced at 
lowest rates on grain in warehouse, interest payable at end of loan. Storage season, ending June 1, 18S41, at rcdu -ed 
rates. On all wheat shipped to Mission Itouk by hargea, freight tates giriranteed the same as to Port Costa. All 
applications for storage or other business addressed to CH ab H SINCLAIR, Superintendent. 

OFFICE , 318 California St., Room 3. 




QUEEN LILY SOAP 

MANIT.«TI RB» BY TUB 

NEW ENGLAND SOAP CO. 



The (,»uer n Ul) Soap was the first and is the only Soap that washes 
without rubbing. From our long expeiieuce, and with improved ma- 
chinery, the great re<liuti< n in material and labor, wc arc now able to 
offer this brand at a great'y reduced pric, and in quality and finish, 
vastly superior to any heretofore manufactured by us. In using the 
(^ueen Lily Soap, it ia impossible to bull the dirt in, it bolls it 
out. The finect Linens, t'a .brics and Laces washed with this Soap, 
come from the wash, sweet, pore and uninjured. 
tiTASK YOl H GROCKK FOB, IT. 

FISCHBECK & GLOOTZ, 

OHKB-SJ14 Sacramento Street, 
Factcrv Sixteenth and Utah Sts., San Francisco. 



New Music Books 



LEAVES OF SHAMROCK. 

A new, 'hoiee and ven musical collection of 100 of the 
best I HI Ml MELODIES. arra> ged for the Piano or 
Organ. They are not difficult, and together form a vol- 
ume of very brilliant and valuable music. Price, cloth, 
$1.50; boards, 91; paper, 80 cent9. 



KINDERGARTEN CHIMES. 

A collection of Songs and fismei for Kinukkuab- 
tkss and Primacy s. iiools. By Kate Douglas Wig- 
gin, of the California Kindergarten Training School. 

A book of fine appearance, with valuable suggestions 
to teachers by a practi' al and enthusiastic "Kindergar - 
ner." who also has a fine and correct taste in poetry and 
music, and provides for the play and study of the chil- 
dren, *7 sweet songs. There are hing Song*, Marching, 
Gift, Came, Good Morning, and other songs (Jood ao- 
i. impairments fur Piano or Organ. Price, $1 S'l cloth; :fl 
boards. 



Piano Classics. Atruh n'eot and beautiful col- 
lection of i ew piano [ kces. Cloth, ¥L£,0; boards, 



College Songs (50 ct«.). Minstrel Song;* («2) and 
« ar Songs |.'.0 cts ) please evervbody, and evervbody 
buv s them. 

, IN I^nUSS. A n -wTemperai - _ 

Book, and a Male Voice Chorus Book. 
XtT Any Book Mailed for the Retail Price. 

OLIVER DITS0N & CO., Boston. 



AMERICAN FRUIT EVAPORATOR, 




SCIENTIFIC IX STRUCTI KH A PRACTICAL SI C- 

cees. World-wide in us Easv and BcopODiical to 
operate. Specially suited for curing without sulphur. 
Highest merit and lowest price ever offered on the Coast 
Illustrated Manual free. Made by Amkricav Masi fact- 

1 rixo Comi anv, Waynesboro, Pa. 

H. C. BRISTOL, Gen'I Agent, 
319 & 321 Market St (Frank Bros.) San Francisco. 



HOWE SCALES 



Q. H. DITSOX Si CO. 



967 Broadway, Nrw Yorf. 



D. N. & O. A. HAWLEY, 

501 to 507 MARKET STKH I .san Franclaco 

nPU/PY A Pi! 'Q SCIENTIFIC PRESS PATKNT 
a*a-« t I « UU. O AGENCY is the oldest estab- 
lished and most successful on the Pacific Coast No. 262 
Market St., Elevator 12 Front St, 8. F. 



tidpks and banking. 



GRANGERS' BANK 

OF CALIFORNIA, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Authorized Capital, - - $1,000,000 

In lO.OOO Shares of $100 each. 

Capital Paid up in Gold Coin, $645,360. 

Keaerved Fund and Paid up Mock, »21,17». 

OFFICERS: 
V. D. LOGAN President 

I. C. STEELE Vice-PreaideDt 

ALBERT MONTPELLIER Cashier and Manager 

FRANK McMULLEN Secretary 

DIRECTORS: 

km T>. LOGAN, President Colusa County 

a 1 LEWELLING, Napa County 

J. h. GARDINER Rio VisU, Cal 

T. E TYNAN Stanislaus County 

URIAH WOOD Santo Clara County 

J. C. MERYFIELD Solano County 

II. M. LARUE Yolo County 

I. C. STEELE San Mateo County 

THOMAS McCONNELL Sacramento County 

C. J. CRESSEY Merced County 

SENECA EWER Napa County 

CURRENT ACCOUNTS are opened and conducted In the 

usual way, bank books balanced up, and statements of 

accounts rendered every month. 
LOANS ON WHEAT and ccuntry produce a specialty. 
COLLECTIONS throughout the Country are mad* 

promptly and proceeds remitted as directed. 
GOLD and SILVER deposits received. 
CERTIFICATES of DEPOSIT issued payable on demand. 
BILLS OF EXCHANGE of the Atlantic States bougl t 

and sold. ALBERT MONTPELLIER, 

Cashier and Manager. 

San Francisco, Jan. 16, 1882. 

STOCKTON 

SAYINGS and LOAN SOCIETY, 



(INCORI-ORATKD Al Ol ST, 1867.) 



STOCKTON, 



CALIFORNIA. 



Paid up Capital, $500,000. 

Surplus, $152,634. 

L. U. SHIPPEE, President. 
F. M. WEST, Cashier. S. S. LITTLEHALE, Ass t Cashier 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: 

L. U. SmrPKK, R. Gnekow, 

R. B. Lake, Otis Perrik, 

Ciias. Haas, H. T. Dorra.nci, 

A. W. Simpson, F. Arnold, 

J. H. O'Brikx, M. L. Hewitt, 

Wm. Ikulu, Chas. Griipb, 

John Dccker. 

UNION SAVINGS BANK 

OAKLAND, CAL. 

CAPITAL $200 000 

RESERVED FUND $100,000 

ASSETS $1,931,000 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: 
A. C HenrY, J. We't Martin, ti. J. Ainswortn, 

J. 0. Ainsworth, S. Huff, R. S. Farrelly, 

R. W. Kirkham, Samuel Woods, D. tlenshaw Ward, 

Hiiam Tubbs, H. A. Palmer. 

Wkst Martin, Pres. H. A. Palmkr, V. Pres. & Treas r. 

INTEREST allowed upon all deposits remaining 
three calendar months, beginning from the first Oi the 
month succeeding the date of deposit. 

Remittances from the country may be made by Express 
or Check upon Banks in San Francisco, and bock will 
be returned. 

LOANS made only upon Mortgage of Real 
Estate and Bonds at curreDt rates. 




WORTH'S IMPROVED 

Combined Toggle Lever and Screw Press. 

I desire to call the 
attention of Wine and 
Cider makers to my 
Improved Press. 
Witli this Press the 
movement of the fol- 
lower is fast at the 
commencement, mov- 
ing one and a half 
inches with one turn 
of the screw. The last 
turn of the screw 
moves the follower 
one-sixteenth of an 
inch. The follower 
has an up and down 
movement of 26| 
inches, with the 
double platform run on a railroad track. You can have 
two curbs, by which you can fill one while the other is 
under the press, thereby doing double the amount of 
work of any other press in the market. I also manufac* 
ture Horse Powers for all purposes, Ensilage Cutters, 
Plum Pittcrs. Worth's System of Heating Dairies by hot 
water circulation, xysend for a Circular. W. H. 
WORTH. Petaluma Foundry and Machine Works, 
Petaluma, Sonoma Co., Cal. 

INDIANAPOLIS 

CHAIR MANUFACTURING CO, 

This old and reliable firm Is now located at thelt 
New Building, 
Number 750 Mission Street, San Francisco 
This immense structure is 50x190 feet, four stories and 
basement The first and second stories are used as sale- 
rooms for a new and select class of goods of latest designs 
and patterns Parties wishing to furnish a house will save 
from 16 to 25 per cent by purchasing their goods here 



WINE 



MAKERS 



Should send for oar KIW Cprr 
I xx.-. ( ut.-.logii.-. i.. . -r nCC. 
Boomer & Bosrhert Press 
Company, Syracuse, N. Y. 



July 18, 1885.] 



pACIFie RURAb press 



4" 



Fossil Elephants in California. 

That both maetodons and mammoths once ex- 
isted in California there is no doubt, since sev- 
eral finds of their bones in a fossilized condition 
have been made. No complete skeleton has 
been exhumed which could be set up in a mu- 
seum for exhibition, owing to the fact that in 
most cases the bones have been more or less 
scattered, portions have been missing, or else 
what have been found soon crumbled when ex- 
posed to atmospheric influences. A deposit of 
bones of a mammoth has lately been opened in 
Yolo county, and the remains have been care- 
fully removed and brought to San Francisco, 
where they have been placed in the museum of 
the California Academy of Sciences.' Mr. C. 
I>. '-ibbes, by authority of the Academy, and 
in its behalf, visited the deposit last week. 

The situation is in the Sacramento valley, 
about 12 miles from the foothills of the 
Coast range, 60 miles from San Francisco in an 
air line, and six or seven miles from Dixon, Yolo 
county. It is on the ranch of Hecht Bros., and 
opposite that of Montgomery S. Currey. The 
bone deposit is on the dry bed of the creek on 
the north side of a shallow stream about 40 or 
. r >0 feet wide, flowing through the center of the 
creek bed, which is about 150 to 200 feet wide. 

In his report to the Academy, Mr. Gibbes 
states that Mr. Hecht discovered the bones two 
years since on a point of land in the bend of 
the creek that had been carried away in the 
great flood three years since, sweeping off two 
or three acres to a depth of 20 feet. Some of 
the large bones Mr. Ceo. W. Pierce had taken 
out and given away to Mr. J. B. Hollingsworth, 
of Woodland. Mr. Gibbes reports that the 
bones are not in the bluff bank but are resting 
on a blue clay or mud, under a yellow clay, 30 
feet from the present stream, which was once 
the margin of the north bank, and are 70 feet 
from the bluff on the present left, or north 
bank of the creek. The bones are about three 
feet above the level of the stream, and the 
bluff bank 20 or more feet above the bones. 
This being the deepest part of the bend makes 
it 100 feet of earth, over 20 feet in depth, that 
was cut off and carried away by the flood. 

Fifteen or sixteen feet in depth fro^ the sur- 
face the soil is a sandy loam, then a yellow clay 
seven or eight feet thick, resting on a blue mud 
or clay. Most of the yellow clay was carried 
oft' by the flood, leaving about 12 or 15 inches 
above the bones, but cut in small channels or 
grooves by the water, and in one of these chan- 
nels the bones were exposed. There was a 
grove of large oaks on the surface above the 
bones before the high water referred to, and the 
north bank is still lined with large oaks above 
and below. 

The yellow clay is intersected by a complete 
network of hard seams of a white calcareous de- 
posit, and i« some places a solid mass 10 or 15 
feet in diameter, resembling a honey comb, as 
if a pool of water had evaporated, leaving 
these specimens. At the first view over the 
ground it had the appearance of numerous 
bleached ribs, and other bones imbedded in the 
clay, and these seams made it difficult in exca- 
vating to distinguish between the bones and 
this calcaveous deposit. 

The impressions of the large bones taken out 
by Mr. Pierce still remained on the blue clay, 
and Mr. Gibbes commenced work at the upper 
end of the humerus, near the shoulder, as it 
was desired to obtain the jaw, or at least a 
tooth. The work proceeded slowly, as they 
had to dig with a knife carefully all around 
each bone to loosen it from the tenacious mud 
and clay in which it was imbedded ; yet even 
with the greatest care, many of the bones 
broke. Several fragments of ribs and other 
bones were uncovered, some imbedded under 
and across others. It became evident, from the 
result of digging, that the head had been above 
the level of the other bones, and had been 
washed away in the upper portion of the clay 
bank. It may yet be found further down 
stream. As far as can be judged, Mr. Gibbes 
thinks the animal must have been lying on its 
right side, with its head up stream. The ele. 
vation above sea level is between 45 and 50 
feet. One of the bones found by Mr. Pierce is 
a humerus 2.2 feet in length, and the other a 
femur, 3.2 feet long. No teeth were found, so 
it could not be stated whether the bones were 
those of a mastodon or a mammoth. Mr. Gibbes 
is inclined to think it was a mastodon. A large 
number of the bones are now at the Academy 
museum. While on his way back to this city, 
he stopped at Martinez, as requested by Prof. 
Davidson, President of the Academy, to exam- 
ine certain large teeth which had been found 
there. What had been supposed to be three 
large teeth of a mastodon, found by Mr. Mar- 
tin Woolbert, proved to be a portion of the 
tooth of a mammoth, split in three pieces, and 
not whole teeth. Mr. Gibbes also examined 
the tooth found by a son of Mr. Jones, which 
is in a better state of preservation. Both were 
found near each other on the beach below high 
tide, near Mr. Woolbert's, a mile east of Mar- 
tinez. Mr. Gibbes visited the spot, and though 
the tide was partly up, they dug under the 
sand and found yellow clay on blue mud. One 
of the teeth, supposed by Mr. Gibbes to be 
that of the Elephas Americanus, has been pre- 
sented to the Academy, 



The Rural Health Retreat. 

At Crystal Springs, near St. Helena, under 
the above title, is one of the best conducted 
sanitariums in the United States. Its managers 
are determined to make it one of the leading 
and most thoroughly conducted health and 
pleasure resorts on this coast. It is not de- 
signed as a money-making institution, but a 
pleasant rural home for all worthy classes who 
seek health, rational amusement and genuine 
recreation. 

The aim of the institution is not simply to 
restore the health of its patrons, but what is 
often more important, to enable them to retain 
it and avoid illness in future. 

Its situation cannot be surpassed for beautiful 
scenery and convenience of location from San 
Francisco. It is on the slope of the Howell 
mountain range, overlooking Napa valley, and 
almost overhanging as it were the eastern su- 
burbs of St. Helena. Howell mountain has 
long been reputed as one of the choicest locali- 
ties in the State for health-recuperating quali- 
ties, and is yearly gaining in popularity. 

The pure soft water of Crystal Springs would 
be a great desideratum in any home. The Re- 
treat is under the management of Elder J. D. 
Rice, who gives constant, careful and conscien- 
tious attention to his duties. He is well sup- 
ported by faithful and competent assistants. 

J. S. Gibbs, Medical Superintendent, is a 
graduate from a thorough medical and surgical 
course in New York city, where he after- 
wards had three years' practice. He was recent- 
ly associated with Dr. J. H. Kellogg, Superin- 
tendent of the Medical and Surgical Sanitarium 
at Battle Creek, Mich., said to be the largest 
institution of the kind at present in the world. 

We advise those wishing further information, 
who cannot conveniently at once visit this place, 
to address "Rural Health Retreat, Crystal 
Springs, St. Helena, Napa county, Cal." 



Heald's Business College Graduates. 

The faculty of Heald's Husiness College takes 
great pleasure in recommending this list of gradu- 
ates, tor the term ending June 30, 1835, as wortliy 
of the favorable consideration and confidence of all 
with whom they may be thrown in contact. Many 
are deserving of honorable mention, while all have 
received, as well as merited, the honors and privi- 
leges conferred by a diploma from the institution: 

Hugh K. Lyons, San Rafael, Ca'.; Wm. L. Stone, Sun 
Lorenzo, Cal.; Wm. B. Larkins, U. F.; Geo. W. Durtield, S. 
F. ; (ieo. H. Median, S. F.; W. G. Strauch, S, P.j Jesse B. 
Held, S. P.; Chas. F. Rickey, Colarille, Cal.; Marius 1). 
A'tigues, S. F; Harry I) Chandler, Elmira. Cal.; Evan E. 
Thomas, Norton ville, Cal.; Frank Hodapti, Isbton, Cat; 
Archihald Campbell, San Loren/.o, Cal.; Ceo. H. BrowD, 
Alameda, Cal.; Chas. C. Thomas, Melrose, Cal. ; Thos. J. 
Murphy, S. F.; Albert Orr, San Felipe, Cal.; R. J. McCor- 
maek, Eugene City, Or.; Fred. Fleishman, S P.; Harry K. 
Hathaway, S. F.; Sophrouia Newman, S. P.; Rose E. Haley, 
Napa, Cal.; John C. Schilling, S. P.; Win. K. Dolan, S, F.; 
Cleo. F. Brodigan, Hawthorne, Nev.; W. E. Maxey, Davis- 
ville, Cal.; Miss Kittie McConuoit, Virginia City, Nev.; Wm. 
A. Wakerly, Napa. Cat; P. E. Keller, S. P.; A. A. (iiusti, 
8. P.; Miss Delia Huntington, Freeport, Wy. Ter.: Wm. E. 
Smith, Pomona, Cal.; Frank F. But erfield, Jamestown, 
Cat; Edwin C. JDoxier, Rio Vista, ('at; F. E. Falor, Areata, 
Cat; Jules .1. Agostiui, Sau Andreas, Cal.; Geo. J. McCor- 
rnick, S. F.; Chas W. Teal, Areata, Cal.; M. E. Hammond, 
Arizona; Miss S. E. McLaughlin. South 8. F.; L. D. Mc- 
Lean, S. F.; C. H. Livingston, Hueneme, Cat; C. C. Bel- 
knap, Portersville, Cal,; L. M. Davenpor-, Red Bluff, Cat; 
W. A. Shepherd, Ceorgetown, (.'at; A. Nelson, Areata, Cat; 
J. L. Madden, Plymouth, Cal.; D M. M.Cauley, S. F. ; A. 
O. Sheridan, Shingletown, CaL| Chas. A. Hunt, Santa Bar- 
bara. Cal. ; W. H. Greig, Honolulu, S. I,; P. McDonald, 
French Gulch. Cal ; F. K. Purinton, S. P.; Miss T. V. Mer- 
chant, S. P.; A. T. Dean, Alameda, Cal : Win.H. Robinson, 
S. F.; H. Avila. Yuma, Ar. Ter.; Thos. S. riarloe, S. F.; 
Leon Weil, S. P.; Saml S. Theller, S. F.; B. Sanford, 
Pacheco, Cal. 

At Woodward's Gardens. 

We used a leisure day last week very pleas- 
antly and profitably in taking our young folks 
to Woodward's (lardens. It was gratifying to 
see that this deservedly popular place is so well 
maintained and patronized. The horticultural 
features are well looked after and the beauties 
of ribbon bedding and massing added to the 
natural growth of the permanently located trees 
and shrubs fills the eye with delight as soon as 
the gateway is passed. The museums are well 
filled, the aviaries and menagerie well stocked 
with vigorous and healthy bipeds and quadru- 
peds. The marine aquarium is still a leading 
feature of the institution. The hosts of ar- 
rangements and appliances for the sports of the 
children are fully appreciated by the young- 
sters, while the elders find plenty of well shad- 
ed seats for contemplation, reading, or refresh- 
ing rest. Visitors to the city should arrange 
their programs for a day at Woodward's both 
for its educational and recreational benefits. 

A VALUABLE REMEDY. 

The attention of our readers is called to Burnham's 
Anicteric, which is an extract of a peculiar kind of Fir 
Balsam, which grows in a certain locality in the Sierras 
of California. It possesses remarkable curative proper- 
ties for many ills of the flesh that the human family is 
Heir to. It is used both internally and externally, as a 
Liniment for the relief of Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Bruises, 
Sprains, Fresh Wounds, Headaches, etc. , it has no supe- 
rior. Internally for Coughs, Colds, Sore Throat. Croup, 
Kidney Troubles, etc. Its effect in Croup is remarkable, 
and is considered quite a specific for it. Those who are 
aware of its merits are never without it, and look upon it 
as one of nature's remedies. It should be in every house- 
hold. Sells for fiO cents and $1 per bottle. Sold by all 
wholesale dealers in San Francisco and by dealers gener- 
ally. For Testimonials of its merits addicss \V. M. 
HICKMAN. Druggist, Slockton, Cal. 



Incuhator Patent. — Some one sends us an 
anonymous communication, asking if a certain 
incubator is patented. The best way to get in- 
formation of this kind is to write to the manu- 
facturers. 

Hall's Hair Renewer is the least troublesome to 
apply, and the most cleanly, of all preparations. 



Almost Incredible. 

And yet the following relation is true in every particu- 
lar, and can be verified by any one who desires to do so: 

Mr. Wm. H. Whitely is widely known to the wholesale 
dry goods trade in this country for his long and active 
connection with the silk and worsted mills of Darby, Pa., 
near Philadelphia. He is a gentleman in middle life, in 
robust health, ai tholv attending to business and enjoy- 
ing the comforts of bis elegant rural home. No one 
would suppose, from his appearance, that for long years 
he was a martyr to that most distressing disease, sciatic 
neuralgia. By what means he was restored from an 
almost helpless condition to sound health, is the story we 
have to present, and we will let Mr. Wbitclv tell it him- 
self: 

"I en jo\ ed good health," said lie to a press reporter 
who had heard of his case and called upon him to make 
inquiry about it, "until about fourteen years ago, when 
one dark winter's night I fell into an excavation made 
for a culvert. With my feet in cold water and my legs 
across a log, I was in a helpless condition for seven 
hours. When I was taken out I was insensible. For a 
month I was confined to bed. On recovering sufficient to 
sit up I found that my digestion was impaired and that 
I bad an obstinate sciatic trouble in both legs. With this 
came acute facial neuralgia. My whole nervous system 
was shattered. Sometime after I was able to walk a lit- 
tle, a feeling like paralysis would take hold of me and 1 
would fall to the ground. At night, instead of sleeping 
soundly, I would roll about hopelessly for hours. I was 
in a constant state of weariness and torture. I tried va- 
rious medical treatments, without regard to expense; but 
got no relief. I gave up business for a while and went to 
Colorado; but it did not help me. 

•'As I had tried almost everything else I thought I 
would try Compound Oxygen, which I had seen adv ertised 
as a vitalizes During my protracted illness, which had 
now lasted for over a dozen years, 1 had made a close 
study of the nerves, and had concluded that vitalizing 
was what I needed. If this Compound Oxygen could 
give renewed vitality it was exactly what I wanted. I 
knew that it would be a severe test for the Treatment, 
for here I was with my nervous system shattered, my 
digestion in bad order, my eyesight troubling me, my 
legs failing me and my powers of sleep practically gone. 

"Well, I took the Treatment at Drs. Starkey & Palen's 
office. Improvement was soon visible, but it was not 
rapid. I had to be patient, but had the best of en- 
couragement in doing so. For about six months I con- 
tinued the Treatment with persistent regularity and with 
the most satisfying results. I became able to attend to 
business. I could eat without distress and I could ob- 
tain refreshing sleep. My tormenting nerve pains were 
gone. Compound Oxygen had triumphed over one of 
the worst cases of sciatica anil nerve prostration that the 
doctors had ever known. I now enjoy excellent health; 
really enjoy it, for you can imagine what a joy it is to be 
well again after my long years of suffering." 

Drs. Starkey <X Palen, 1109 and 1111 Girard street, 
Philadelphia, will send free, to any one who will write 
for it, their Treatise on Compound Oxygen, from which 
all desired information in regard to this wonderful Treat- 
ment can be obtained. 

Orders for the Compound Oxygen Home Treatment 
will be filled by H. E. Mathews, 621 Powell street, bet. 
Bush and Pine, San Francisco. 



Merrv making Melodies. — A vocal visitor 
to cheer the children is a new music book by 
Wade Whipple. Published by Oliver 1 >itson 
& Co. , Boston. It has songs and piano accom- 
pauiments complete, good music, and a fair 
amount of pictures; and the whole made on 
purpose "to please the children" is quite a 
rarity. Merry-making Melodies has 44 large 
pages and 20 songs. The names are: Try It, 
Mowing, Chatterlox, Kriss-Kringle, Crandpa, 
Little Paddy, Twilight, Jollity .lack, Pink a- 
Pank, Off for School, Teeter-Tauter, Three 
Little Loafers, Mooley Cow, Daisies, Tom and 
Tim, Baby, Rockaby, Moonlight, The K-ide, 
Bonny Robin. 



Invest while Real Estate is Low. 

A Rare Oiler for Small Investments in 
San Francisco. 

The following property in San Francisco will be sold at 
low rates, exceedingly favorable to purchasers who wish 
to buy for safe and profitable investment: 

In Gift Map No. 3, northwest corner of Aztec street and 
California avenue, S lots, Nos 84, 86 and 88. On the 
southwest corner of Aztec street and California avenue, 
5 lots, Nos 98, 100, 102, 104 and 106. On the west tide of 
California avenue, between Hope and Tomasa streets, lot 
No. 1,423. On the east side of Shakespeare street, be- 
tween Hope and Isabel streets, lot No. 1,441. Twent.v 
lots, comprising a whole block, on the south side of Cali- 
fornia avenue, bounded on the other three side* by Brad- 
ford, Standish and Mayfiower streets, Nos. 1,189 to 1,209, 
inclusive. 

In Gift Map No. 4, southeast corner of Tslais Creek 
channel and Chace street, 4 lots, Nos. 1,969, 1 970, 1,971 
and 1,972. Northwest corner of Chace and Freedom 
streets, 5 lots, Nos. 1,955, 1,956, 1,957, 1,958 and 1,959. 
South side of Napoleon street, east from Bigg street, 2 
lots, Nos. 2,527 and 2,528. North side of Tulare street, 
east from Bigg street, 2 lots, Nos. 2,543 and 2,544. 

Also, two lots, Nos. 82 and 84, Oakland Homestead As- 
sociation, situated near Lake Merritt and on the easterly 
road to Piedmont, near the northwesterly limits of East 
Oakland. They are 50 feet wide by loo leet deep, with 
extra land and frontage in one. 

The owners themselves offer tre above lots to actual 
purchasers at bedrock prices, and believe that no other 
property can be bought in the vicinity for immediate use 
or for Investment on nearly as favorable terms. 

tfSTApply to or address H. F. D , care of this paper. 



Fruit Ranch for Sale.— Attention is called 
to the advertisement in this issue by O. J. I'ar- 
mele of his fruit ranch for sale. The ranch is 
in the famous Vacaville fruit district, and some 
descriptive points are given in the advertise- 
ment. Further information can be had by ad- 
dressing the owner or visiting the place, 



VlNKVARb Laborers who cndkrktand thmr BUSINESS, 
also Fanners, Teamsters, Carpenters, and others, fur- 
nished (prickly by sending your orders to .1. F. CROSKTT 
& CO., 628 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 



CASH RENT.— A fine piece of property with good 
improvements is offered to rent at a very moderate 
rate for n term of years, if applied for immediately. 
Address B. M. Dewey, Tulare City, Cal.j 



Opera Glasses for the Panorama at Muller's 
Optical Depot, 136 Montgomery street, near 
Bush, opposite Occidental Hotel, x 



Dewey & Co., American a 
Foreign Patent Agents. 

PATENTS ootained promptly; Caveats f ki 
expeditiously; Patent Reissues taken out; 
Assignments made and recorded in legal fond; 
Copie3 of Patents and Assignments procured; 
Examinations of Patents made here and. at 
Washington; Examinations made of Assign- 
ments recorded in Washington; Examinatio c : 
ordered and reported by Telegraph; Rejected 
cases taken up and Patents obtained; Inic;- 
ferences Prosecuted; Opinions rendered li- 
garding the validity of Patents and Assign- 
ments; Every legitimate branch of Paten': 
Soliciting promptly and thoroughly con- 
ducted. 

Our intimate knowledge of the various invent 
tions of this coast, and long practice in paten- 
business, enable us to abundantly satisfy our 
patrons; and our success and business are 
constantly increasing. 

The shrewdest and most experienced Inventors 
are found among our most steadfast friends 
and patrons, who fully appreciate our advan- 
tages in bringing valuable inventions to the 
notice of the public through the columns of 
our widely circulated, first-class journals — 
thereby facilitating their introduction, sale 
and popularity. 

Foreign Patents, 

In addition to American Patents, we secure 
with the assistance of co-operative agents, 
claims in all foreign countries which grant 
Patents, including Great Britain, France, 
Belgium, Prussia, Austria, Baden, Peru, 
Russia, Spain, British India, Saxony, British 
Columbia, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Mexico, 
Victoria, Brazil, Bavaria, Holland, Denmark, 
Italy, Portugal, Cuba, Roman States, 
Wurtemburg, New Zealand, New South 
Wales, Queensland, Tasmania, Brazil, New 
Granada, Chile, Argentine Republic, AND 
EVERY COUNTRY IN THE WORLD 
where Patents are obtainable. 

No models are required in European countries, 
but the drawings and specifications should be 
prepared with thoroughness, by able persons 
who are familiar with the requirements and 
changes of foreign patent laws — agents who 
are reliable and thoroughly established. 

Our schedule price for obtaining foreign patents, 
in all cases, will always be as low, and in 
some instances lower, than those of any other 
responsible agency. 

We can and do get foreign patents for inventors 
in the Pacific States from two to six months 
(according to the location of the country) 
sooner than other agents. 

The principal portion of the patent business of 
this coast has been done, and is still being 
done, through our agency. We are famili.vr 
with, and have full records, of all former 
cases, and can more correctly judge of the 
value and patentability of most inventions dis- 
covered here than any other agents. 

Situated so remote from the seat of (Jovernment, 
delays are even more dangerous to the invent- 
ors of the Pacific Coast than to applicants 'n 
the Eastern States. Valuable patents may be 
lost by extra time consumed in transmitting 
specifications from Eastern agencies back to 
this coast for the signature of the inventor. 

Confidential. 

We take great pains to preserve secrecy in 
all confidential matters, and applicants for 
patents can rest assured that their communi- 
cations and business transactions will be held 
strictly confidential by us. Circulars of in- 
formation to inventors, free. 

Home Counsel. 

Our long experience in obtaining patents for 
Inventors on this Coast has familiarized us 
with the character of most of the inventious 
already patented; hence we are frequently 
able to save our patrons the cost of a fruitless 
application by pointing to them the same 
thing already covered by a patent. We are 
always free to advise applicants of any 
knowledge we have of previous applicants 
which will interfere with their obtaining a 
patent. 

We invite the acquaintance of all parties con- 
nected with inventions and patent right bus; • 
ness, believing that the mutual conference of 
legitimate business and professional men is 
mutual gain. Parties in doubt in regard to 
their rights as assignees of patents or pur- 
chasers of patented articles, can often receive 
advice of importance to them from a short ca.l 
at our office. 

Remittances of money, made by individual in- 
ventors to the Government, sometimes mis- 
cany, and it has repeatedly happened thai 
applicants have; not only lost their money, but 
their inventions also, from this cause and con- 
sequent delay. We hold ourselves response's 
fcr all fees intrusted to our agency. 

Engravings. 

We have superior artists in our employ, and 
all facilities for producing fine and satisfactory 
i'lustrations of inventions and machinery, tor 
newspaper, book, circular and other printed il- 
lustrations, and are always ready to assist 
patrons in bringing their valuable discoveries 
Into practical and profitable use. 

DEWEY & CO., 

United States and Foreign Patent Agents, pub- 
lishers Mining and Scientific Press and Pacific 
Rural Press, 252 Market Street. Elevator, 
12 Front St., S. F. 



50 



p>ACIFie RURAL> pRESS 



[July 18, 1885 



breeders* birectoiy. 



hi\ line* or less in this Directory at 50c. a line per month 



POULTRY. 



D D BRIGGS. Los Oatos, Cal., importer and breeder 
of Langshans, W. F. 111. Spanish, Bl. Hamburg, Ply- 
mouth Rocks, Black Japan Bantams, liolden Spangled 
Poland's, PfMn Ducks. Circulars free. 



T. D. MORRIS, Sonoma, Cal. Tuolouse and Embden 
Geese, Bronze and W. Holland Turkeys, and all leading 
varieties of Thoroughbred Poultry. 

MRS. D. O. VESTAL, San Jose. Brown Leghorns 
Langslians and Ph mouth Kocks. Kggs anil Fowls. 



CALIFORNIA POULTRY FAR M.Stockton, Cal 
Importers anil breeders of Thoroughbred Poultry. Eggs 
and chicks for sale. Cutting & Robinson, P. O. Bos " 



R. G. HEAD, Napa, Cal , breeder of high-class Land 
and Water Fowls and Berkshire Pigs, Brahma", Cochin: 
Langshans, Plymouth Kocks, Leghorns, Geese, Duck 
Turkeys. Send J-cent stamp for Circular. 



A. PROVO KLUIT, Fruitvale avenue, Alameda Co., 
Cal., P. O. Box -J19, Oakland, breeder and importer of 
tine Thoroughbred Pnultrv. Circular free. 



O. J. ALB EE, Santa Clara, Cal., breeder of Lang 
shans, Partridge Cochins, Pedigreed Scotch Collies, 
White Crested Black Polish, Wyandottes, Brown Leg 
horns, and Black B. It Came Bantams. 



D. H. EVERETT, 1616 Larkin St., San Francisco 
breeder of Langslians exclusively. Eggs and fowls. 



MRS. J. H. SMYTH, 6ii Montgomery St., San Fran- 
cisco. Thoroughbred Langshans; Eggs il 00 per 1 3. 

C. H. NEAL, Lodi, San Joaquin Co., importer and 
breeder of Thoroughbred Poultry for 20 y ears. Has 
all the leading varieties and birds of all classes for sale, 
as well as Eg gs for hitching. 

W. C. DAMON, Napa, White and Brown Leghorns, 
B. Spanish, P. Kocks, Light Brahmas, Langshans, Pe- 
ll In Ducks; eggs 10 cts. ; fowls $2.00 each. Circulars 
free. 



MRS. L. J. WATKINS, San Jose, Cal. Pure bred 
Fancy Poultry. White and Brown Leghorns, Plymouth 
Rooks, Langshans, Houdans, Light Brahmas, and 
Black Spanish. Eggs and Fowls^ 



AXFORD'S IMPROVED INCUBATOR. For 
further information address 1. P. Clarke, May-field, Cal. 

MRS. M. E. NEWHALL, San Jose. White and 
Brown Leghorns, Langshans, Plymouth Rocks, Light 
Brahmas, Pekin Ducks and Bronze Turkeys. 

SMITH'S POULTRY YARDS, Blanding avenue, 
Alameda, Cal. All the leading varieties of Thorough- 
bred Fowls, and I.-- - for hatching. Also the Alameda 
Brooder and agent for the Belief Incubators. Address, 
Chas. W. Smith, P. O. Box 67, Uaklaud, Cal. 



GEO. B. BAYLEY, 1317 Castro St., Oakland, Im- 
porter and Breeder of all the best known and most 
profitable Land and Water Fowls. Publisher of the 
Pacific Coast Poulterers' Hand Book and Guide. Price 
40 cents. Send 2-cent stamp for Illustrated Circular. 



HORSES AND CATTLE. 



WILLIAM NILES, Los Angeles, Cal. Thorough- 
bred Poultry, Cattle and Hogs. Write for circular. 



J. R. ROSE, Lakeville, Sonoma Co., Cal. Breeder 
of Thoroughbred Devons, Roadsters and Draft Horses. 

COTATE RANCH BREEDING FARM, Page's 
Station, 3. F. & N. P. K. R. P. «>., Penn's Grove, 
Sonoma Co., Cal. Wilfred Page, Manager Breeders 
of Short Horn Cattle, English Draft Horses, Spanish Me- 
rino SheeD and Berkshire Swine. 

S. SCOTT, Cloverdale, Cal. , Importer and Breeder of 
high-breed Short Horn Cattle of the beBt milking quali- 
ties. Importod Duke of Auckland (3S:>) at head of herd. 
Jacks ami b}>anish Merino Sheep. All kinds of stock 
for sale. 

ROBERT BECK, San Francisco, Breeder of Regis- 
tered Thoroughbred Jerseys. 

MRS. M. E. BRADLEY, San Jose, Cal. Breedei 
of recorded thoroughbred Short Horn Cattle and Berk- 
shire Hogs. A choice lot of young stock for sale. 



PETER SAXE & SON, Lick House, San Francisco, 
Cal. Importers and Breeders, for past 14 years, of 
every variety of Cattle, Horses, Sheep and Hogs. 

J. A. BREWER, Centervttie, Alameda Co., Cal. 
Short Horns and Grades. Correspondence solicited. 



SWINE. 



WILLIAM NILES, Los Angeles, Cal. Thoroughbred 
Poland-China an d Berkshire Pigs. Circulars free 

JOHN RIDER, Sacramento, Cal. Breeder of Thor 
oughbred Berkshire Swine. My stock of Hogs are all 
recorded in the American Berkshire Record. 

F. W. SCOFIELD, Santa Cruz, Cal., breeder of 
thorou g hbred Duroc Jersey Swine. P igs for sale. 

TYLER BEACH, San Jose, Cal. Breeder of Thor 
ouehhred Berkshlres. 



SHEEP AND GOATS. 



L. U. SHIPPEE, Stockton, Cal. Importer and breeder 
of Spanish Merino Sheep, Durham Cattle, Red Duroc 
»nd Berkshire Swlno Hitrh eraded Rama for aula 



JULIUS WEYAND, Breeder of pure-blooded An- 
gora Goats, Little Stony, Colusa Co., Cal. 



BEES. 



WM. MUTH-RASMUSSEN, Independence, Inyo 
County, Cal., dealer in Honey, Comb Foundation, and 
Italian Queens in season. Bee hive and frame ma- 
terial sawed to order. 



J. D. ENAS, Sunnyside, Napa, Cal., breeds Pure 
Italian Oueens. No foul brood. Comt Foundation, 
Extractors, etc. "Cook's Manual of the Apiary." 



COOK FEED STOCK 



With the Tit II Ml' II 
NT K A :\l GENEKAIOK 
It will save j to i of your 
Feed, and your stock will 
thrive better and fatten 
quicker. Send for 1 Uustrated 
Circular. Address Trtuuau, 
Ishaiu & Co., 608 Market 
Street, San Francisco, Cal 




AsoELi/s Liver Pills cure rheumatism and headache. 



Houses \hd C^jjue. 




FINE IMPORTED 

Pare Bred & High Grade Animals 

FOR SALE 

BY TIIR 

PETALUMA STOCK BREEDERS' ASSOCIATION, 

location: 
PETALLMA, SONOMA CO., CAL., 

HOARD OF DIRKCTORS: 

J. R. ROSE, TI1EO. SKILLMAN, K DEN .MAX, 
ROBERT CRANE, J. EL WHITE. 

Everything Guaranteed as Represented. 
Fine Breeding Animals a Specialty. 

HORDES: Draft, Carriage and Roadsters. 

CATTLE: Holstein, Devon, Jersey, Ayrshire and Short 
Horns. 

SHEEP: Merinos, Shropshires, Southdowns and others. 
SWINE: Berkshire, Duroc and Polund China. 
POULTRY: All approved varieties. 

Call on or address .J. II. MeNABB, Ser'y, 

McCune's Block, Pt talunia. 



ONTARE RANCHO. 

Imported French Coach Horses, 

CLYDESDALE HORSES, 

Trotting Bred Roadsters, 

AND 

IMPORTED 

HOLSTEIN CATTLE 

F. T. UNDERHILL, Proprietor. 

Address C. F. SWAN, 

Santa Barbara, Cal. 




DUROC SWINE. 

Fine Pigs of the Above Breed 

FOR SALE. 

1-fTEight of my Pigs are now on record as foundation 
stock in the RECORD BOOK of the American Du- 
roc Jersey .Swine Breeders' \ mi of 

which I am a member. 

F. P. BEVERLY, 
Mountain View, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 

ONESA POLAND CHINA FARM. 




ELLAS GALLUP, Hanford Tulare, Co., Cal. 

Breeder of pure bred Poland China Pigs of the Black 
Beauty, Black Bess, Bismarck, and other noted families 
Imported boars Kiug of Bonny View and Gold Dust at head 
of the herd. Stock recorded in A. P. C. R. Pigs sold at 
reasonable rates. Correspondence solicited. Address aa abore 



SQUIRREL and GOPHER 
EXTERMINATOR ! 



BADEN FARM HERD. 
Of Short Horn Cattle and Dairy Cows. 

Catalogues and Prices on application to 

ROBERT ASHBURNER, 
Baden Station, ... Ban Mateo Co 

WANTED. 

A 2-Year-Old 

rHOROUGHBRED DURHAM BULL. 

State price to F., "Rural Press" Office. 




This'.Extermlnator dispenses with all poi- 
sonous and dangerous preparations. 

THE MATERIAL USED COSTS NOTHING. 

For particulars, send for Illustrated Circular with 
Testimonials. Address: 

JOHN TAYLOR, or F. E. BROWNE 

44 So. Spi lug Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



500 HEAD ON HANI). 



The Largest and Choicest Herd in this Country. 



Over thirty yearly records 
made in this herd average 
14,212 lbs. 5 ounces; average 
age of cows 4$ years. 

In 1881 our entire herd of 
mature cows averaged 14,164 
lbs. 15 ounces. 

In 1SS2 our entire herd of 
eight three-year-olds aver- 
aged 12.38S n,s. 9 ounces. 



April 1, 18S4, ten cows in 
this herd had made records 
from 14,000 to 18,000 each, 
averaging ir>,8(JS lbs. 3-10 

OMll'-CS. 




For the year ending June, 
1884, five mature cows aver- 
aged 15,621 lbs. 1 2-5 ounces. 

Seven heifers of the Ne- 
therland Family, Ave of them 
2 years old and two 3 years 
old, averaged 11,556" lbs. 
1 2-5 ounces. 

BUTTER RECORDS: 



Nine cows averaged 17 tbs. 
&i ounces per week. 

Right heifers, 3 years old, 
averaged 13 Its. 4J ounces 
per week. 

(BUTTER RKCOKDS CONTINUED.) Eleven heifers, two years ohl and younger, averaged 10 tl>a. 3 
ounces per week. The entire original imj>orte(l Ncthertand Family of six cows (two being hut 3 years old) averaged 
17 Its. 6 1-6 ounces per week. 

Every animal Kelcrtedl by a member of the firm in person* 

tfrWUvii fritting always mention the PACIFIC Kural Pkshs. 

SMITHS, POWELL & LAMB, Lakeside Stock Farm, Syracuse, N. Y. 




THOROUGHBRED MERINO 



We Have on Hand and FOn SAIjE 

OVER 500 TWO-YEAR-OLD 

THOROUGHBRED AMERICAN MERINO 

RAMS, of our own breeding, in splendid condition. Also, 
about the same number of Yearling Kains. 

OTTo reach us, come via Stockton to Milton, where a 
conveyance to the ranch will be furnished on Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays. Con eapondeiice will receive 
prompt attention. Circulars sent on application. Address : 
KIRKPATRICK St WHITTAKER, 
Iron Mountain Ranch, 

Knight's Ferry, Cal. 

April 25, ISS5, 



Sr|EEf r\ND StjEEpw^Sh:. 




THOROUGHBRED 

SPANISH MERINO SHEEP. 

The Premium Band 
of the State. 

Took five first prem- 
iums exhibited at 
the State Pair in issi, 
L88S, 1883, and all the 
Premiums in 1884. 

Ibis stock has no superior in the United States. I 
will sell my Bucks and Ewes at prices to suit customers, 
and in all cases guarantee satisfai-tion. 

Correspondence solicitud. Address 

FRANK BULLARD, 

Woodland, Yolo Co., Cal. 

RAMS FOR SALE. 

20O THOROUGHBRED 
Ami Graded 

SPANISH MERINO 

Rams for Saie. 

Bred from the first imiior- 
tations of Spanish Merino 
Sheep to California, In ISM. 
Thoroughbred and lligh-Crade Ewes for sale. Prices 
reasonable. Residence, . ne mile north of Mi-Connell's 
Station, Western Pacific Di) ision C PR. R. P. 0. address 
MRS. E McCONNELL WILSON, 

Elk (irove, Sacramento Co., Cal, 




Tlioroviglxlarcci 

SPANISH MERINO SHEEP. 




Our stock is without superior in the State; in good 
condition, free from all disease. Prices reduced to suit 
the market. Orders solicited, and tilled with prompt- 
ing and s> 

- 1S. W. WOOLSEY & SON, 

Fulton, Sonoma Co., Cal. 




E. W. PEET, 



Importer 



THOROUGHBRED 



Breeder 



SPANISH MERINO SHEEP. 

400 Head for Sale. 



E. W. PEET, 
Hay wards, Alameda Co., Cal. 

SHEEP DIP~ 

Price Reduced to 
$1.25 

PKK GALLON. 

Twenty gallons of fluid 
mixed with cold water will 
make 1,200 gallons of Dip. 
It is superior to all Dips and Dressings for 8cab in 
Sheep; is certain in effect; is easily mixed, and is applied 
in a cold state. Unlike sulphur or tobacco, or other 

fioisonous Dips, it increases the growth of the wool, stim- 
ates the fleece, and greatly adds to the yolk. It destroys 
all vermin. It is efficacious for almost every disease (in- 
ternal and external) sheep are subject to. 

FALKNER, BELL & CO-, 

San Francisco. Cal. 
Calvert's Carbolic 

SHEEP WASH. 

9'i per Gallon. 

After dipping the Sheep, la use- 
ful for preserving wet hides, de- 
stroying t. e vine pest, and for 
wheat dressings and disinfecting 

Sorposes, etc. T. W. JACKSON, 
. F., Sols Agent for Pacific Coast. 





ITALIAN SHEEP WASH. 

EXTRACT OF TOBACCO. 

Free from Poison. 

Cures thoroughly the MCA B 
Ol THE SHEEP. 

BEST teuiedy koowu. Costa 
l*eM than I ceut Tier head 
for dipping. Reliable testi- 
monials at our office. For 
particulars apply to 
CIIA8. DfTISENBF.RO & CO.. Sole Agents, No. 314 Sacra- 
mento Street, San Francisco. 




CALVES and COWS 

Prevented sucking each other, also, self sucking, by 
Rice's Patent Weaner. Used by all Stock Kaisers'. 
Prices by mail, postpaid; For Calves till one year old, 
55 cents; till two years old, 80 cents; older, (1.12. Circu- 
lars *-ee. Agents wanted. 

H. C. RICE, Farmlngton, Conn. 



July 18, 1885] 



fACIFie fyjRAb fRESS. 



51 



LONG LOOKED FOR COME AT LAST ! 

THE PACIFIC 

INCUBATOR 

Hatches Eggs Better than 
a lien. 

Send Stamp for Illustrated Cir- 
cular to GEOKGE B. BAYLEY, 
Manufacturer, 1317 Castro St., 
Oakland, Cal 

N. B.— A large line of Poultry 
Appliances, such as Wire Netting, 
Bone Mills, Chopping Machines, 
etc. , for sale at the lowest rates. 

The Pacific Coast Poulterers' 
Hand Book and Guide; price 40c. 

$25 to $300 per MONTH 

Made by Families Using the 

CALIFORNIA INCUBATOR AND BROODER 

Sold on Installments. 

A success guaranteed in raising poultry with our ma- 
chines. Automatic supply of moisture and self-regulat- 
ing. Turns eggs instantly. Best percentage of hatch 
and hest chicks obtained. Machines warranted. Send 
for Circular. 

CALIFORNIA INCUBATOR CO., 
401 Tenth St (cor. Franklin), Oakland, Cal. 





J. M, HALSTED'S 

INCUBATORS 

From $20 up. 
The Model Broodei 
from $5 up. Send 
for circular contain 
ing much valuable 
information. 

Thorough bred 
Poultry and Eggs, 
lull Broadway, 

Oakland, Cal. 




CALIFORNIA POUL- 
TRY FARM. 

Headquarters for Thor- 
oughbred Poultry and Eggs. 
We have all the leading and 
most profitable breeds, 
thicks for delivery Sept. 1, 
1885. Agents for White 
Mountain Incubator. Send 
Sc. stamp for pice list. 

CUTTING & KOBINSON, 
P. O. Box 7, Stockton, Cal. 



HILLSIDE POULTRY FARM. 

Headquarters for Pure Langshans — the 
Great Egg Producers. 
Early Chicks for sale — single pairs, trios or pens. 
Also, a few choice Light Brahmas and Plymouth Rocks. 
Stock large, strong and vigorous. Eggs that will hatch 
$3.00 per 13. 

MRS. J. RAYNOR, 
Frultvale, Alameda Co., Cal. 
lyVisltors take horse cars at East Oakland. 




Importer and Breeder of choice Poultry— Langshans, 
Light Brahmas, Partridge Cochins, Plymouth Rocks. A 
trio of Langshans, imported direct from Croad's Yard, 
England. Eggs and young stock for sale. Send for far- 
ther information. 




D. H. EVERETT, 

1616 Larkln Street, 

San Francisco, 

BREEDER OF CROAD STRAIN 

— OF — 

LANGSHANS 

Exclusively. 

Eggs and Breeding Stock for 
Sale. -Eggs, $3 for 13. 



EAGLE POULTRY FARM. 

Fruit Vale, Alameda County, Cal. 

RDUBERNET, BREEDER OF THO- 
• roughbred Fowls. Eggs and Fowls for sale. Brown 
and White Leghorns, $1 per setting. Plymouth Rocks 
and Houdana, $l.fi0 per setting; White Face Black 
Spanish and Langshans, $2 per setting; Pekin Ducks, $1 
per setting. Money to accompany order. Address, 

R. DUBERNET, 
P. O. Box 75. Brooklyn. Alameda Co., Cal. 




~Y\T YANDOTTES, PLY- 

* ' mouth Rocks, Light Brah- 
mas, Langshans, Brown Leg- 
horns, B. B. K. Game Bantams, 
Pearl Guineas, Homer Antwerp 
Pigeons. 

J. N. LUND, 

Cor. Piedmont Av. & Booth St., 
P. O. Box 118. 



inCU TC WANTED for the History of Christianity, 
nut " '»y Abbott. A grand chance. A $4 book 
at the popular price of $1.75. Liberal terms. The re- 
ligious papers mention it as one of the few great religious 
works of the world. Greater success never known by 
agents. Terms free. 8TINSON & CO., Publishers, Port- 
laud, Uaiu*. 



"EXCELLED BY NONE. 



, P. HENDERSON & SON, 



SUCCESSORS TO M. P. HENDERSON. 
Established In 1869. 



Carriage Factory and General Repairing Shops. 



C/5 
Q_ 



CO 
CO 




30 
O 
CO 

m 

C/5 



O 

CO 



30 
CO 



Vehicles of all Kinds and Styles 

MADE AND KEPT IN STOCK- 

Carriage Materials and Hardware 

FOR SALE. 

All Work Warranted and nothing but the best of everything used. 
Corner MAIN and AMERICAN STS.. STOCKTON, CAL. 

43TSend for Circular, Illustrations and Price Lists of our work. Mention this paper. 



CALIFORNIA STATE FA 

1335. 

At Sacramento, September 7th to 19th, 
Two Weeks. 

The attention of the farming community of this State la 
particularly called to the lib.-ral awards offered for 

County DESxiliiloits- 

The encouragement the Board met with in their first 
effort to establish a depaitment of this character, has in- 
duced them to increase the amount of premiums this year. 
The exhibits made in thi < department at the last State Fair, 
were forwarded to New Orleans, and formed a greater part 
of California's exhibit at theWoild's Fair of 1884-5, where 
they created an interest, and at the same time presented the 
practical results of farming in Califor. ia. The object of the 
Board in offering these inducements, is to bring directly to 
the noti< e of the world the superior advantages attained by 
California in farm products. The tide of immigration has 
turned this way. Those seeking homes among us are anx- 
ious to obtain as much i formation as possible as to the 
yield of various products in d iff- rent localities, etc. No 
better method of showing the different resources of each 
county could be devised. To this eni 'he Board has offered 
for the most Dxfeiihive. Perfect, amd Varied 
Exhibit of Farm Product** (exclusive of livestock) 
exhibited a» a County Production, the sum 
of $1,500, divided as follows: 

For the Best Display $500 00 

The remaining one thousand dollars will be distributed 
among the other counties in equitable proportion, consider- 
ing the merits of each county exhibit. 

Competition to be between counties only. That is to say, 
that the entire exhibit made by one county must com- 
pete AGAINST the ENTIRE EXHIBIT of another county. The 
premium awarded to each county exhibit will lie paid to the 
committee in charge of said exhibit. 

The State Board of Agriculture earnestly desires the 
hearty co-operation of the various subordinate Granges 
throughout the State, in making this exhibition of Cali- 
fornia's products a success, whereby the varied products of 
different localities may be fully shown. We would ask the 
appointment of a committee from the Orange in each 
county to call upon and urge the Patrons to make a display 
representing their respective couuties. 
| ££T.Skni> for Premium List. 

JJlSSE D. CARK, President. 
EDWIN F. SMITH, Secretary. 



M. T. BREWER, President. 



E. P. FELLOWS, Secretary. 



A. D. CUTLER, Treasurer. 



PACIFIC FRUIT COMP'Y 

WHOLESALE AND COMMISSION DEALERS IN 

California Green and Dried 

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WineandCider Press 



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HENRY TYACK, 

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Where oie of the Presses can be seen. 

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Circulars and price sent on applica- 
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OThe BUYERS' GUIDE is 
issued March mid Sept.. 
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52 



pAClFie RURAb pRESS 



[Jul* lg. 1885 



Notk. — Our quotationsare for Wednesday, not Saturdaj 
the date which the paper bears. 

Weekly Market Review. 

DOMESTIC PRODUCE, ETC. 

San Francisco. July 15, 1885. 
Trade matters are still very quiet and nothing of 
much interest to report, Wheat seems quite at a 
standstill; only two cargoes have gone out this month 
so far. Advices do not favor much activity at pres- 

tn just as we go to press we receive the Produce Ex- 
change report of amounts of grain on hand July 1 
in California warehouses. The following are the 

totals: . , 

July 1, 1885. July 1. 1884. 

Klour, bbls 7°,8oo 112,600 

Wheat, ctls S.3 82 '9°° 664,050 

Harley, do 608,550 640,350 

Oats, do 107,440 58,450 

Beans, do 82 . 28 ° 44.175 

Corn, do 7*-*°° 16110 

Kye, do 3*. 8 75 30,100 

The amount of wheat on hand is much less than 
most estimates have placed it. 

The latest from abroad by cable is as follows: 
Liverpool, July 1 5th. — W H K AT— Very quiet. 
California spot lots, 6s tod to 7s id; off coast, 34s; 
just shipped, 36s; nearly due, 34s; cargoes off coast, 
weaker on passage, neglected; Mark l.ane wheat 
and maize, slow; English and French country mar- 
kets, quiet. 

Freights and Cnarters. 

The following is a summary of the engaged and 
disengaged tonnage here and at adjacent points and 
on the way to this port Monday morning: 

1885. 1884. 

Engaged tons in port 29,700 32,700 

Disengaged 98,600 144,600 

On the way i95.5°o 218,400 

Totals &3.%oo 395.700 

Decrease, 1885 7«.9°o 

Foreign Review. 
London, July n-— The Mark Lane Express, in 
its review of the British grain trade during the past 
week, says: Fine July weather has prevailed. The 
drought is practically unbroken. The Wheat crop 
is prospering, though other crops have been severely 
punished by the drought. Sales of English Wheat 
during the week were 28,491 quarters, at 33s 8d 8? 
quarter, against 26,607 quarters, at 36s 9d during the 
rorresponding week of last year. Foreign Wheat is 
very quiet. In the off coast market there is a mod- 
erate trade. Fifty-one cargoes arrived, 10 were sold, 
12 were withdrawn and 33 remained, including 9 
California and 1 Oregon. To-day there was no in- 
quiry for Wheat and values were nominal. The 
large number of arrivals of cargoes tends to depress 
the mark.-t. Flour was depressed and values weaker. 
Corn was unchanged. Barley was dull and Oats 
quiet. 

The English Wheat and Flour Market. 

|Reporte.l by Anton Ki irke & <'o., Liverpool, England.] 
Another week in extreme depression in all 
branches of the < lorn trade has to be chronicled, and 
Wheat is id fc? ctl lower on the week, and though 
there is perhaps a slightly better feeling at the close, 
it remains to be *een whether this will stand the test 
of most favorable weather and very heavy prospective 
arrivals. Flour continues very dull and depressed, 
and we quote prices all round a shilling fr? sack 
lower on the week. Present prices quite include the 
possibility of remunerative importations from the 
producing countries, and we think that these reduced 
and low values are now well worth buyers attention. 
The reports regarding the state of the American 
Wheat crop do not improve, and with a very short 
crop there, a higher range of prices seems quite un- 
avoidable, as soon as our receipts show a falling off. 
The arrivals though much less than last week are 
still quite ample, viz: 384, 560 qrs. of Wheat and 
I lour, and the total imports into the U. K., from 
1st of September to 1st of June are now 13.488,129 
qrs. of Wheat and Flour. 

Liverpool, June //, 1885. 
Eastern Wool Markets. 

New York, July 11. — Reports upon the condition 
of trade among local dealers have been free from 
anything in the way of a snappish character, and in 
some cases the tone assumed was quite slow. The 
market, however, changes so little inessential points 
as to leave scant opportunity for variation in the 
general form of reports, and dealers express surprise 
that they should be requested to furnish information, 
such as might be called really new. Buyers have 
lx-en a little more plenty than early in the week, but 
are operating in the old, slow and indifferent man- 
ner. Indications of a little more interest in fine 
wools, however, were not wanting and it is said that 
this feeling has been quite decided at Boston, where 
some heavy lines, it is understood, have changed 
hands at 32 cents for XX and 32@34 cents for de- 
laine, taken mainly by consumers. Indeed, a 
greater degree of confidence is expressed, not in a 
buoyant form, but simply that no lower rales are to 
be'looked for. and some chance exists for a moder- 
ate gain. The reduction of the crop is again becom- 
ing a matter of considerable discussion, and already 
the supply at primary points has been largely taken 
up. Sales include 14,000 pounds scoured California 
at 36ft'44 cents. 

Philadelphia, July 14. — The wool market is 
steady and prices unchanged. 

Boston, July 14. — Wool is firm for desirable 
grades. Ohio and Pennsylvania are quotable at 30 
(1132c; for X and double X Michigan, 27(8280; 
combing and delaine, 30(0 340; unwashed wools, 17 
@2ic; pulled wools, 25(0310 for good and choice 
superiors. 

New York Hop Trade 
New York, July 11. — The market remains posi- 
tively dull. Small purchases by or for brewers cover 
about all that is doing, except the occasional local 
trade induced by low prices. Values are still unset- 
lied and irregular, with the undertone of the market 
still weak. Pacific Coast, 1884, poor to choice, j(w 
10 cents, 

New Y'ork. July 14.— Hops have not been quoted 
so low in ten years as now, The following prices 



PACIFIC COAST WEATHER FOR THE WEEK. 

[Furnished for publication in this paper by Nelson Ooroh, Sergeant 8ignal Service Corps, U. 8. A. 





Portland. 


Red Bluff. 


Sacramento. 


S. Francisco. Los Angeles. 


San Diego. 


DATE. 


w 


H 








9 




J= 


P 


h 

o 




1 


t 


H 
flf 




i 


s? 








1 




4 


Si 


July 8 14 


p 


ft 

E 
•a 


p. 


eather . . 


6" 


B 

<s 


E 
& 


eather. . j 


6" 


B 

■a 


§ 
a. 


ft 

ft 


a 


B 


- 

p. 


m 

s 

Jl 


O 


g 

B 
r> 


D 

a. 


~ 

— 




a 


B 
•p 


e 
c 
— 


eather. . | 




.00 


62 


8. 


Cy. 


.00 


78 


SE 


Fr. 


.00 


73 


8 


CI 




65 


W 


Cy. 


.00 


83 


W 


CI. 


.00 


71 


W 


CI. 




.00 


72 


SW 


Cy. 


.00 


82 


S 


Fr. 


.00 


78 


8 


CI. 


.00 


66 


W 


CI 


.00 


81 


\v 


CI 


.00 


71 


w 


CL 




.00 


74 


\\\ 


Ol 


.00 


90 


SW 


Ol. 


.00 


77 


NW 


Ol 


.00 


64 


w 


01 


.00 


90 


w 


CL 


.00 


73 


W 


CL 




.00 


80 


NW 


OL 


.00 


91 


S 


CI. 


.00 


83 


n n 


CI. 


.00 


62 


w 


CL 


.00 


92 


w 


CL 


.00 


75 


W 


CL 




.00 


72 


S 


Cy 


.00 


96 


N 


CI. 


.00 


85 


\ w 


CI. 


.00 


70 


SW 


CL 


.00 


97 


w 


CL 


.00 


77 


w 


ci. 






64 


N 


LR. 


.00 


% 


N 


CL 


.00 


86 


NW 


CL 


.00 


68 


s w 


CI 


.00 


93 


B 


CI. 


.00 


75 


SW 


Cy. 


Wednesday 


.•-'4 


70 


SW 


Cy 


.00 


HO 


\u 


OL 


.00 


87 


N W 


CL 


.00 


76 


SW 


CI 


.00 


90 


SW 


CL 


.00 


76 


SW 


CI. 


Totals 


.21 








.00 








.00 
















.00 








n 









Explanation — CL for clear; Cy , cloudy; Fr , fair; Fy., foggy; — indicates too small to measure. Temperature 
wind au.l weather at 12:00 M. (Pacific Standard timet, with amount of raiufall in the preceding 24 hours. 



are from the current number of Wells' Weekly: 
Strictly cash New York best, n@i2c $ pound; 
medium, iofajiic; low, 8@9c; Eastern, 8@ioc; 
Wisconsin, 8@9c; yearling's, crop 1883, 5@6c; Pa- 
cific Coast, .choice, 9<8>ioc; medium, 8(0190; low, 
6@7c; Bavarians, nominal, 26(01270; Bohemians, 
28@29C. Anything strictly choice in "States" 
would probably bring 14c in New York now, but not 
more. Hops cannot be raised in this State for less 
than ioc, but they can on the Pacific Coast, owing 
to the cheapness and greater fertility of the soil 
there. The Utica Herald says: There are only 60 
davs to the time for the new crops. If nothing hap- 
pens, more than now foreseen, the hops of 1884 
will then be w orth only 3@4C 

BAGS.— Calcutta Wheat, 4K@5#c; California 
Jute, 55^c; Potato Gunnies, io@iic. 

BAKI.F.Y. — Barley is quotable about 5c per ctl 
higher than last week. Receipts are moderate and 
upon their remaining so the present market seems 
to depend. Sales on Call to-day were as follows: 

Seller season— 100 tons, $1.18%. Buyer, 1885— 
200 tons, $t.27, i s; 400, $1.27!^; 300, $1.27; 200, 
$1.26;*; 400, $i.26J<; 600, $1.26; 300, $1.25}*'. 
Seler, 1885, old— 100 tons, $1.19. Seller, 1885, new 
—200 tons, $1.19; 100, $i.i8Ji; 100, $1.18^; 300, 
$i.i8K; 200, $1.18 per ctl. Buyer season— 200 
tons, $1.31 j»® r.32. Buyer, 1885 -1,700 tons, 
$i.26^(? 1.27%. Seller, 1885—200 tons, $1.19. 
Seller, 1885, hew— 1,300 tons, $i.ig@i.x$M pe r ctl - 

Buyer season — 100 tons, $1.65^; 800, $1.65; 100, 
$1.64^; 200, $1.64^; 400, 1.64M; too, $1.64^; 
600. $1.64^. Buyer 1885—500 tons, $1.54; 500, 
$1.55; 600. $i.555i: 400. *i.55#; 7O0, $i.5SH: 200, 
SI-55H; 200, $i.55Ji ^ ctl. Buyer season— 1,600 
tons. $1,66'*. (5s $1.67^. Buyer 1885—4,400 tons, 
$i.57(fl)$i.58K. 

BEANS— Bean supplies are still large and prices 
unchanged. 

CORN— Corn is abundant, and the demand at 
present light. Prices are unchanged. 

DAIRY PRODCCK— Choice butter sells well and 
is in moderate supply, while fancy lots are reported 
scarce. There is a large offering of lower grades. 
Cheese is unchanged. Supplies are being held back 
because of the low values, and this is w ise where 
good curing rooms are provided. 

FRESH MEAT— Beef has decreased %c per lb. 
for the best, spring lamb and small calves are higher. 
The pork range is about the same except that a 
ery low rate is offered for store hogs, and many are 
arriving here from the south coast in almost an un- 
salable condition. 

Sales of live stock for the week as reported to the 
Grocer are as follows: 

San Francisco Stock Yards.— 498 cattle llarge; 
fall, $50; 482 cattle (medium; fair! $33; 231 cattle 
(mixed), $30; 683 calves, $4 75, $6.50, $8; $10, $13, 
Ji8; 4.970 sheep, $1.75, $2, $2.25; $2.50, $2.75, $3; 
2.235 lambs, 75c, $1.25, $1.50, $1.75, $2; 2,631 hogs, 
2^c. 2^c, 2%c. 3c, 4c, 4K. 

Oakland Slock Yards. -175 cattle (large; good I, 
$46.50; 213 cattle (medium; lairi, $31, 145 calves, 
$4-75, *5 SO. $'7. J8.75, $12, $17; 847 sheep, J1.50. 
$1.75, $2, $2.25; $2.75, $3; 483 lambs $1.25, $1.50, 
*i-75. * 2 : 395 hogs. sXc, 4c, 4"^c, 4!ic, 4#c 

EGGS — Eggs are unchanged for the best which 
are scarce. There is a great stock of store eggs and 
railroad eggs, and dullness results. 

FEED— Bran is $1 lower per ton, and middlings 
has also dropped off. Hay is unchanged, though 
supplies are large and trade is slow. Choice wheat 
and wild oat, $14 fr< ton. Fair to good lots run as 
follows: Wheat and wild oat, $io@i3; barley. $8(5) 
11; stable, $10(513; alfalfa, $io@i2; cow, $8@t2per 
ton. 

FRUIT -Peaches are in their hight and very low 
prices have prevailed. The market to-day is a little 
better than it has been because receipts have less- 
ened. Watermelons are now coming by the car- 
load from Lodi. Currants have dropped out. Figs 
are scarce. Apricots, apples, pears and plums are in 
large supply. Prices are given in our table. 

HOPS. — Bales in this market are dropped to 30(0 
6c fri ctl. Reports from the East, given or this page, 
are anything but encouraging. 

OA TS. — Nothing of any account is doing, and 
prices are unchanged. 

ONIONS. -Rates for reds and silver skins are ad- 
vanced this week. 

POTATOES. — There is a large stock, and rates 
are 5(0100 lower fr? ctl. 

PROVISIONS — There is no improvement in 
prices, in fact a downward tendency has continued. 
Smoked beef and bacon can be bought lower than 
before. 

POULTRY AND GAME— Ducks and geese are 
lower. Turkeys have advanced ic fr? It) since our 
last report. Fowls are unchanged. Hare and rab- 
bits are very low and little wanted, owing 'o the 
excessively hot weather. Venison is as cheap as 
beef. 

VEGE TABLES — Cabbage, cucumbers and sum 
mer squash are higher this week. Tomatoes are 
also doing better. 

WHEAT — Little is doing either by sample or on 
call. The following are call sales to-day. 

WOOL- Trade is of small account ami rates are 
1 unchanged. 



Beef. 1st (iual., It 


CIS 


6) 




5i| 


6 




l"< 


5 




4 


5 


Spring Lamb.... 


6 <g 


7 


Pork, undressed. 




4 




5 « 


6 


Veal 


8 <f 


12 



Domestic Produoe. 



W U OLKHA LK 




BEANS AND PEAS 

Bayo, ctl 2 60 ^ 2 7£ 

Butter 75 

Castor 4 (» 

Pea 1 50 

Red. 1 50 

Pink 1 SB # 1 M 

Large White.... 3 00 _ 
Small White.... 1 50 ■ 1 80 I 

Lima 1 <K) @ 1 75 

F'ld Peas,blk eye 1 25 @ 1 50 

do green 1 50 g 2 50 

BROOM CORN. 

Southern 3 

Northern 4 

CHICCORY. 

California 4 

German. . . 
DAIRY PRODtJC 

BUTTER. 

Cal. fresh roll, tt>. 1, 

do Fancy br'nds 21 <r 

Pickle roll 15 la 

Firkin, new 15 <r 

Eastern 15 ■ 

New York — << 

OHEESI 

Cheese, Cal., lb.. 6 « 
Eastern style... 16 
eoos. 

Cal.. ranch, doz.. 20 @ 

do, store 18 @ 

Ducks — & 

Oregon — & 

Eastern, by ex.. l<i (3 

Pickled here — @ — 

Utah - <H - 

FEED 

Bran, ton 14 50 @15 50 

Cornmeal 28 00 (£30 00 

Hay 8 00 OgH 00 

Middlings U 00 @21 00 

Oil Cake Meal. 30 00 « 

Straw, bale 50 <g 65 

FLOUR. 
Extra, City Mills 4 25 @ 5 00 
do Co'ntry Mills 4 00 & 4 62j 

Superfine 2 75 ■ :) 50 

FRESH MEAT 



25 1 



65 



is 



50 <a 60 



63 1 



70 



Wednesday. July lg, 1885 

NUTS— Jobbing. 
Walnuts, Cal.. tti 7 «» 

do Chile. 
Almonds, hdshL 7 @ 

Soft shell 10 6* 1 

Brazil 10 (ft ] 

Pecans. & I 

Keanuta 3 W 

Filberts H a 

POTATOES. 

Burbunkse. — & 

Early Kove .... 

CuffeyCo 

Petal uma 

Tomalea 

River reds 

Humboldt 

do Kidney 

do Peacbblow. 

Jersey Blue 

Chile 

do Oregon . . , 

Peerless. 

Salt 1. l. • 

Sweet ctl 2 00 <g 

POULTRY AND GAME. 

Heus, doz 5 00 & 7 00 

Roosters 5 00 ■ 7 00 

Broilers 2 50 « 400 

Ducks, tame.... 2 50 @ i 00 

Geese, pair 1 25 

Wild Gray, doz 
Wl.it. do... 

Turkeys, lb 

do Dressed.. — 
TurkeyFeathere, 

tail and wing.. 10 
Snipe, Eng., doz. 1 50 

do Comaion.. 75 (fit 
Quail.. 
Rabbits 
Hare 
Venison 

PROVISIONS. 
Cal. Bacon, 

Heavy, tt> 

Medium 

Light 

Extra Light. . . 

Lard 

CaLSmokedBeef 

Shoulders 10 

Hams, Cal 10 

do Eastern.. 12J 
SEEDS. 




HALL'S 

S ARS APARILL A 

Cures all Diseases originating from 
a disordered state of tne BLOOD or 
LIVER. Rheumatism, Neuralgia, 
Boils, Blotches, Pimples, Scrofula, 
Tumors, Salt Rheum and Mercurial 
Pains readily yield to its purifying 
properties. It leaves the Blood pure, 
the Liver and Kidneys healthy and 
the Complexion bright and clear. 

J. R. CATES & CO. Proprietors, 

i 1 7 Sansome St. San Francisco 



12j« 



GRAIN, ETC. 
Barley, feed, ctl. 1 15 1 
do Brewing.. 1 25 1 

Chevalier 1 20 1 

do Coast. . . 1 10 1 

Buckwheat 1 25 (_ 

Corn, White.... 1 22} S 1 25 

Yellow 1 22(tf 1 25 

Small Round. 1 25 @ 1 27} 



1 20 
1 40 
1 30 
1 20 

1 30 



Nebraska I OS A 1 10 

Oats, choice 1 30 ^ 1 40 

do No. 1 11*9! ?? 

2} 



do No. 2 1 07 ® 1 

do black 1 10 @ 1 

do Oregon Hi II 22} 

Rye 1 25 « 1 30 

Wheat. No. 1... 1 40 g 1 42} 
do No. 2... 1»| - 
Choice milling 1 45 @ 1 50 
HIDES. 

Dry 164® 17 

Wet salted 7}<8 », 

HONEY, ETC. 

Beeswax, lb;. .. . 21 @ 

Honoy in comb. 6 

Extracted, Bgbt. 
do dark. 

HOPS 

Oregon 

California. ...... 

Wash. Ter — 

Old Hops — 

ONIONS 

Red 1 00 

Silrerskin 1 25 

do Oregon. ... — 
do Ut»h — 




Alfalfa.. 

do Chile 

Canary 

Clorer red 

White 

Cotton 

Flaxseed 

Hemp 

Italian RyeGraaa 
Perennial 

Millet, German., 
do Common. 

Mustard, white.. 
Brown 

Rape 

K>. Blue Grass.. 
2d quality 

Sweet V. Grass, 

Orchard. 20 1 

Red Top 16 1 

Hungarian.,.. f 

Lawn 3t 

Meaqult, 10 

Timothy ( 

TALLOW. 

Crude, lb 5 (ft 

Refined 710 

WOOL, ETC. 
8PBINO— 1885. 

Mendocino and 
Souoms 18 (d 

Northern 15 (ci 

San Joaquin. .. 11 <cp 

South Coast 10 (S 

Calaveras and 

Koothill 14 (ft 

Oregon, Eastern 13 (ft 
do Valley. . 16 (ff 



N 



List of D. S. Patents for Paoiflo Coast 
Inventors. 

[From the official list of U. 3. Patents In Diwrr ft Co.'i 
8ciENTiric Press Pateut Aoknct, 262 Market St, a F.| 

FOR WEEK ENOING JUNE 30, 1885. 

320.995. — Darner and Mender— (ieo. F. At- 
kinson, S. F. 

320.996. — Ore Separator, etc.— Jos. Behm, 
San Jose, Cal. 

321,003. —Ore Roasting Furnace— Wm. 
Bruckner, S. F. 

321,005. —Road Locomotive— Geo. G. Buck- 
land, Tulare, Cal. 

321.089. — Agitating Apparatus for Plant 
Washes— K. J. Delancy. San Jose. Cal. 

321.090. — Bkesw ax Extractor— J. D. Enas. 
Napa, Cal. 

321.022 .—Endless Roi-e Traction Railway— 
A. S. Hallidie, S. F. 

3:1,038.— Pipe Tongs— Geo. B. Koons, Half 
Moon Bay, Cal. 

321,130.— Wire Stretcher, etc. — Ela Moon-, 
Walla Walla. W. T. 

321,051.— Excavator— H. Rengstorff, Moun- 
tain View, ( al. 

321,054. — Screw Fastening eoh Boxes, etc. — 
Eugene Ritter. Germany. 

320,982. — R. R. Switch— J. R. Stephens, Port- 
land, Or. 

320,998.— Harvester Finger Bar — W. L. 
Walker, Capay. Cal. 

321,067. — Rake tor Conducting Grain to 
Thrashers— J. T. Watkins, S. F. 

321.135.— Fruit Drier— L. W. Parsons, I-os 
(ialos, Cal. 

Notk.— Copies of U. S. and Foreign Patent* furnished 
by DawEYft Co., in the shortest time possible (by tele- 
graph or otherwise,) at the lowest rates. American 
and Foreign patents obtained, and all patent business for 
Pacific Coast Inventors transacted wi(h perfect security 
and in th* shortest possible time. 

Easy Binder. 

Dewey's patent elastic- binder, lor periodicals, music 
and other printed sheets, is the handiert, best and cheap- 
est of all economical and practical file hinders. News- 
papers are qatakly placed in it and held neatly, as in a 
ilnth-bouiid hook. It is durable and so simple a child can 
use It. Prire, size of Mining and Scientific Press, Rural 
Press, Watchman, Fraternal Record, Masonic Record, 
Harper's Weeklyiaud Scientific American, 75 cents; post- 
age, 10 cents. Postpaid to subscribers of this paper, 50 
cent*. Send for illustrated circular. Agents wanted. 




Fruits and Vegetables. 



FRUIT MARKET 

Apples, box 25 @ 

Apricots, bx 18 ■ 

Bananas, bunch. 1 50 <a 2 

Blackberrlea.cht 1 75 (« 3 

Cherries, bx 40 (a 

OherrypluniB Of 

Cant aloupe!, cr. 1 50 Iff 3 

Cruhapplts, box 35 (ft 

Fi,», H 60 5 1 

Gooseberries — 5 (a 

Grapes box 75 (a 1 

do Sweetwater 50 (a 

dn Muscat.... 1 50 (if 2 

Currauts, chat.. . 2 25 cc 2 

Limes, Mex 11 00 <gl2 

do Cal. box... 76 (ft 1 

Lemons, Cal., bx . ■' I 

do Sicily, box. 7 00 @ 8 

do Australian. — @ 

Nectarines box. 50 (a 

Oranges, Cal., bx 1 00 (Q 1 

do Tahiti, M 9 00 @10 

do Mexican, M — (& 

do Panama... — <g 

Peaches, bx. . . 15 ■ 

do basket. .. 25 fl 

Pears bx 40 (ft 

do Bartktt 1 25 fl 1 

Plneapplea, doz. 6 00 ® 7 

Plums lb } 

Rispberries, ch 4 00 @ 6 

Strawberries ch. 2 00 (ft 3 

Wateimelon.10015 00 <a25 

DRIED FRUIT. 

Apples, sliced, lb 2 
do evaporated, 
do quartered .. 

Apricots 

Blackberries... 

Citron 

Dates 

Yi*i, 1 reuse!. . 

Pisa, loose 



rHOI.KHALB. 

Wednesday. 



July 18, 1885. 
9 10 



> 2 50 



10 



Nectarines 

75 Peaches 7i 

50 do pared..... 12. 
50 Pears, sliced.... 2 

00 do qrtd 1 

Plums 2 

30 Plum t pitted.... 4 

00 Prunes 4 

50 do French 5 

25 Raisins, Cal. bx. 2 25 
8 do halres.... — 
00 dn quarters.. — 
75 do eighths... — 
uO Zante Currants. 8 
75 VEGETABLES. 

00 Asparagus bx . . 1 00 @ 
25 Artichokes, doz. 
60 Beets, ctL 

01 Cabbage, 100 lbs. 

- Carrots, sk 

75 Caulillower, doz. 

50 Celery, doz 

00 Cucumbers box. 

- Eggplant, box . . 
Garlic, lb 

40 Green Com, doz 

35 Green Peas, sk . 

85 do sweet, lb. 

65 Lettuce, doz 

00 Mushrooms, lb... 
1| Okra, green t>... 

00 Parsnips, ctl.... 

1 10 Peppers, dry B).. 

00 do green. box 
Rhubarb box... 
3 Squash, Marrow 

6 fat, too 15 00 320 00 

2 do Bummer bx 50 @ 60 
7 1 Tomatoes box.. 40 (5 50 
' River 75 & 1 00 

30 Striug beans.... lr@ -I 

UH do Fountain.. 31> 4 
5 Turnips otl 75 » - 

n 



Complimentary sam.'-lks of mis 
paper are occasionally sent to parties 
connected with the interests specially rep- 
resented in its columns. Persons so re- 
ceiving copies are requested to examine its- 
contents, tenns of subscription, and give it their 
own patronage, and, as far as practicable, aid in 
circulating the journal, and making its value 
more widely known to others, and extending its 
influence in thecausc it faithfully serves. Sub- 
scription rate, S3 a year. Extra copies mailed 
for 10 cents, if ordered soon enough. Per- 
sonal attention will be called to this (as well, 
as other notices, at times), by turn- 
in" » leaf. 

Our Agent*. 

Ocr Fruinds oan do much in aid of our paper and the 
Cause of practical knowledge and science, t>y assisting 
Agents In their labors of canvassing, by lending their in- 
fluence and encouraging favors. We Intend to send none 

but worthy men. 
Jakku C. HoAff— California. 
J. i. Bartell — California. 
A. C. Knox — Ventura and Los Angeles Co s. 
O. W. Inoai/LS— Arizona. 

E. L. Richards— San Diego Co. 

F. W. Smith — El Dorado and Placer (Vs. 
W. B. Ttrker — Oregon. 

Geo. McDowell— Fresno and Tulare Oo's. 





New Flour Mill at Petali'.ma.— The burn- 
ing of the new wood-roller flour mills of Percival 
Brothers, of Petaluma, last December, resulted 
in the organization of a joint stock company, 
composed of a number of leading citizens, with 
a capital stock of $80,000, who have just had 
completed a fine brick-roller flour mill at a cost 
of $60,000, $27,000 of which is in machinery. 
The mill was put in operation last week, and is 
turning out flour at the rate of 125 sacks a day. 

The Pacific Rural Press is my favorite paper. 
I expect to take it so long as it is published and I 
am able to read. It is the best agricultural paper 1 
ever saw , and I have seen quite a number of them. 
—J. H., Humboldt Co. 

Help i-or Postage. — We repeatedly receive let- 
ters with the above stamped on them, showing that 
enterprising parties oftentimes forget to put stamps 
00 their letters. This may account occasionally, for 
the non-receipt ol letters alleged to be sent to us. 



July 18, 1885.] 



fACIFie I^URAId fRESS. 



53 



Inducements to Subscribers. 



To favor subscribers to this paper, and to induce new 
patrons to try our publication, we offer the following 
advantages to all new subscribers who pay one year in 
advance, or present subscribers who will pay their sub- 
scriptions up to a date fully one year in advance of the 
present time. We will furnish the following articles 
(while this notice continues), at the reduced rates named, 
viz.: 

RKOl'LAR 

1. — The Agricultural Features of Cali- priob. 
f ornia, by Prof. Hilgard, 13* large pages, 

bound in stiff cloth Postpaid for 25 cts. $1.00 

2. — World's Cyclopaedia, 794 pages, with 

1,200 illustrations, worth SI. 75 Postpaid for 50 cts. 

3. — Patent Binder (cloth cover) with name 

of this paper in gilt Postpaid for 50 cts. 1.00 

4— Niles' Stock and Poultry Book, pamph- 
let, 120 pages Postpaid for 25 cts. .50 

6. — Kendall's Treatise on the Horse and 

Diseases Postpaid for 5 cts. .26 

Q. — To New Subscribers, 12 select back 

Nos. of the Rural Prkss Free .76 

7. — Any of Harper's first-class periodicals, 
15 per cent less than regular rates. 

8. — Frank Leslie's and most other U. S. 
periodicals, 15 per cent discount from 
regular rates. 

9. — Pacific Coast and Eastern Dailies, Books 
and Periodicals, except special publica- 
tions, we can usually give 10 to 15 per 
cent, less than advertised retail rates. 

10. — Picturesque Arizona, 380 pages, in cloth 

and gilt Postpaid for 25 cts. 1.25 

1 1. — California!!, 100 pages, Magazine, 1880 

to 1882 (3 Vols.) single Nos. . . Postpaid for 3 cts. 35 
Per volume, unbound, 5 Vols. , Postpaid for 20 cts. 2.00 
Per volume, bound, cloth back and 
otiff paper sides Postpaid for 40 cts. 2. 50 

12. — Flower and Garden Seeds as per list 
previously published, or which list we will 

send on application Postpaid for 10 cts. 1.00 

13 — Picturesque California Homes(40 build- 
ing plans and estimates) Postpaid for $1 3.50 

14. — Dewey's Patent Newspaper File Hold- 
er (18 to 36 inch) 25 cts. .50 

IB. — Catalogue of European Vines Free .25 

16. — The A B C of Potato Culture 10 cts. .35 

17. — Sugar from Melons, 56 pages Free .25 

Notb. — The cash must accompany all orders. If too 

much is sent for any article or publication, the balance 
will be returned immediately. Address this office, No. 
252 Market St., S. F. 

P. S. — No. 11 is really a valuable premium to new 
comers and others w ho appreciate the better class of 
stories and a good standard of California literature. 
Webster's Dictionary, 634 pages, with 1,500 

i 1 lustrations 50 cts. 1 . 50 

Grant Lithograph, size 24\10 50 cts. .50 

Cleveland Fine Steel Plate, size 12x16 10 cts. 50 

Grant Steel Plate, cabinet size 5 cts. 

Send for any further information desired. 

Readers will please inform their new neighbors and oth- 
ers concerning our paper and these offerings. On appli- 
cation, sample copies of this paper will be mailed free to 
the address of any persons thought likely to subscribe. 



CRYSTAL SPRINGS. 



Tins Dbsirahi.b 

Summer Resort and Sanitarium, 

Situated on Howell Mountain, 21 
miles N. W. of St. Helena 
IS OPEN 

To those seeking health, or rest and recreation. Scenery 
is unsurpassed. Air balmy, free from fogs and malaria. 
Water pure and soft, from a fine spring. Bathing facili- 
ties first-class. Good Gymnasium. Carriage and horse- 
back riding. An experienced physician and surgeon, 
with gentlemen and lady assistants, will attend all cases 
needing his caie. Excellent facilities for treatment. 
Terms reasonable. Send for Circular or "Come and see." 
Address RURAL HEALTH RETREAT, 
St. Helena, Cal 



A $3-50 Premium for $1 to Subscribers of 
this Paper. 



Pictoresp Catalan Homes. 



A V0M1MK OF 



Forty Plates, Plans, Details and Specifica- 
tions of Houses. 



Costing from $700 to $15,000, and adapted 
to Families having Oood Taste and 
Moderate Means. 



CITY AND COUNTRY HOMES. 



This work is designed to meet the wants of that large 
number of persons who have but a limited amount of 
money at their command, and in building a home wish 
to use it to the best ad\ antagc. Drawn by Samuel and 
.loseph C. Newsom, Architects, San Francisco, who have 
taken much pains in its preparation, and confidently as- 
sert that mechanics, clerks, salaried men, workingnicn of 
every calling contemplating building, carpenters and 
builders in cities, towns and villages, will find this book 
a useful aid, worth many times its cost in the informa- 
tion and practical suggestions which it gives. 



3NT ational 




Trad* Mark 



HORSE LINIMENT. 

THE BEST IN THE MARKET. 

Barbed Wire. — Mr. Matteson, of Wallace, Cal , says: 
"I have had abundant experience in the barbed wire 
business. I have had my best horses frightfully cut with 
it, but 1 can cure them so quickly w ith the National 
Horse Liniment that it ceases to scare me when they get 
a fresh cut. I consider it the best Horse Lini-nent in the 
market." FOR SALE BY ALL DRUGGISTS. 



The Plans are clear, and finely drawn on Lithograph 
Platen, and handsomely printed; size, 'JxlJ inches. 



Subscribers to this paper (old or new), who pay one 
year in advance of the date of application for this pre- 
mium, can have the same by paying 31 additional. Sent 
by express unpaid, or on receipt of $1.10 postpaid. 



HEALB'S 



BUSINESS 
COLLECE, 

24 Post St. S. F. 

Stnd for Circular. 




This is a cut of our very elegant and excellent abdom 
ini.il support for ladies. It fits the form perfectly, and 
for the support it gives is worth all we ask for it. It i9 
not only a support and protection to the spine and abdo- 
men, but it contains our Magnetic Shield, which 
relieves all aches and pains in a few minutes; strengthens, 
tones and revitalizes all the weak organs and tissues in a 
few months. 

There are thousands of women in all parts of the coun- 
try who are finding these belts their only relief. There 
is warmth, comfort, life and action secured from wear- 
ing them. They wear for years, and do not lose their 
virtue. 

We have tried all kinds and classes of curative agents; 
we have had years ot experience in treating all forma of 
female complaints, and this b It is worth all the drugs, 
manipulation, bandages, supports, pads and plasters on 
the market. When the back is lame, tender oi sore, wear 
this belt. When the kidneys are too active, too sluggish, 
inflamed, or are diseased with any form of kidney 
troubles, put the belt on. When there is inaction of 
the bowels, put the belt on. When there are any abdom- 
inal troubles, known as female ailment.!, put the belt 
on, and we will risk our reputation that re'ief and cure 
"1 come quicker than by the application or use of any 
other treatment. Ladies, try these magnetic belts, for 
in them is comfort and help for you in all your special 
ailments. 

£3TSend for "Plain Road to Health." Free. 

CHICAGO MAGNETIC SHIELD CO., 

106 Post St., San Francisco. 



Sedgwick ST S E Fence 




Is the best general purpose wire fence in use. 
It is a strons net-work without barbs. 
Don't injure stock. 1. " Ml turn dogs, pigs, sheep, 
and poultry, as well as horses and cattle. The 
best fence lor Farms, Gardens, Stock ranges, and 
Railroads. Very neat, pretty styles for Lawns, 
Parks, School lots, and Cemeteries. Covered with 
rust-proof paint, or made of galvanized wire, as 
preferred. It will last a life-time. It is better 
than boards or barbed wire in every respect. 
Give it a fair trial ; it will wear itself into favor. 
The Sedswick Gates made of wrought iron 
pipe and steel wire, defy all competition in light- 
ness, neatuess, strength, and durability. We 
make the best, cheapest, and easiest working 
all-iron automatic or self-opening gate, 
and the neatest cheap iron fences now 
made. The Boss folding poultry coup is a 
late and useful invention. The best Wire 
Stretcher, Cutting Pliers, and Post Au- 
gers. We also manufacture Itussell's excel- 
lent Wind Engines for pumping, and Geared 
Engines for grind ng, etc. Por prices and particulars 
ask Hardware Dealers, or address, mentioning paper, 

SEDGWICK. BROS.. Richmond, Ind. 



THE DIXON CRUCIBLE CO 

JERSEY CITY, N. J. 

Manufacturers of 

DIXON'S BLACK LEAD CRUCIBLE 5. 
DIXON'S LEAD PENCILS. 
DIXON'S STOVE POLISH. 
DIXON'S AXLE GREASE. 
DIXON'S PLUMBAGO. 
DIXON'S BLACK LEAD. 
DIXON'S GRAPHITE. 

J G. ALLEN, 

Sole Agent for the Pacific Coast 
106 Davis St. (near California), San Francisco 
<S"Prk-es same as at Factory. 



Educational. 



NAPA COLLEGE, 

NAPA CITY, CAL. 

The Fall Session Will Open 
JULY 29, 1885. 

238 STUDENTS LAST YEAR. 
Faculty Consists of 12 Members. 

OPEN TO BOTH SEXF.S 

With Classical, Philosophical, and Scientific courses lead- 
ing to the degrees of A, B., B Ph., and B. S. 
Thorough course in Music, Art, and Elocution. 
The several Departments are in charge of teachers of 

experience and ability, chosen with special reference to 

their work. 

The Commercial Department is well provided with 
facilities for acquiring a Tiioroium Practical Bi sinkss 
Education. 

Delightful climate, pleasant surroundings, with home 
on grounds where parents may know that their pons and 
daughters are carefully guarded, and under the direct 
supervision of the faculty. 

jHTFcr Catalogue or information address 

A. E. LASHER, President. 

LITTON SPRINGS COLLEGE 

Sonoma County, Cal. 

This institution lias the advantages of country .oration 
and of entire exemption from the temptations incident 
t > cities and towns. The climate is fine and the build- 
ings are large and commodious. There are 800 acres of 
land, a dairy of 20 cows, and an orchard and \ ineyard, to 
which hoys have access at all recesses. The drainage is 
perfect, and in the 15i years of its history the school lias 
not lost a hoy by death the best testimony to the ex- 
cellence of sanitary conditions and to the care takm of 
b >vs' health. In the great universities of the Kast, the 
highest honors that have been gained by Californian 
students have been won bj members of this Bchool. 

JOHN GAMBLE, B. A.. Principal. 



CALIFORNIA MILITARY ACADEIT 

OAKLAND, CAL. 





Term^beginslNlonday, JJULY^O, 1885, 

COL. W. II. OBR1KN, Principal. 

HOPKINS ACADEMY. 

OAKLAND, OAL. 

Rev. H. E. JEWETT, Principal. 

NEXT TERM 

Begins Tuesday, July 28, 1885. 

fc^-SEND FOB CATALOGUE, "mi 



TRINITY SCHOOL, —CHURCH. BOARDING AND 
Day School for Young Men and Boys, 1534 Mission 
St. , San Francisco. Prepares for College and University. 
Christmas Session opens I hursday, July 23, 1SS5. Refers 
to— Wm. F. Babcock, Esq., Col. F.. E. Eyre, Jos ph 
Powning, Keq., Gen. L. H. Allen, Win. T. Coleman, Esq., 
Geo. W. Gibbs, Esq. For information, add. ess, REV. E. 
B. SPALDING, Rector. 



IRVING INSTITUTE, 

A Boarding and Day School 
FOR YOUNG LADIES, 

1036 Valencia Street. San Francisco. 

Til K NEXT SESSION 

Will Begin July 27, 1885. 

Rev. EDW. B. CHURCH, A. M. , Principal. 

SACKETT SCHOOL. 

English, Classical and Commercial Courses 
of Study. 

STRICTLY FIRST-CLA.SS In all Respects. 

The next School Year will begin Monday, .July 20, 
I 885. Send address, for Catalogue, to 

D. P. SACKETT, A. M. , Principal, 

5211 Hobart St., Oakland, Cal. 



BOWENS ACADEMY, 



University Avenue, 



Berkeley, Cal. 



Preparatory, Commercial, and 
Academic Departments. 

NEXT TERM BEOINS 

Monday, July 20, 1885 Send for Circulars to 

T. STEWART BOWENS, B. A., T. C. D., Principal. 



ST. MATTHEW'S HALL, 



San Matoo, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half-vcar ending June 3(1, 18H5, the Board of 
Directors of the German Savings and Loan Society has 
declared a dividend at the rale of four and one half (4J) 
per cent, per annum, on term deposits, and thr.e and 
three-fourths (3J) per cent, per annum, on ordinary de- 
posits, and payable on and after the 1st dav of July, lfcsSft. 
By order. GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 

Fruit and Garden Cart. 

Write to this office if you wish to get a good fruit hand- 
cart at a bargain. Freight paid to any part of California. 



O 

cc 

LU 
X 
o 
<r 

LU 



LU 
LU 



0C 



o 
z 



o 



a. 

LU 

DC 




O 

30 



© 

30 



00 

a 

C/5 



-o 

30 

m 
~o 

2> 
DO 



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C5 

m 



The 



Next 
Rev. 



Term Commences Thursday, July 23, 1885. 

FOR CATALOGUE ADDRESS 

ALFRED LEE BREWER. M. A., Principal. 




PATENT 

LIFE-SAVING RESPIRATOR 

Entirely Prevents Lead Poisoning 
and Salivation 

The most perfect appliance for people engaged in 
Smelting. Dry Crushing, Guano Works, 
Quicksilver Mines, Lead Corroding, ami all 

other occupations where there is dust, poisonous vapor, 
or had odor. 

In Feeding Threshing Machines, and hi 111 i 

lar work, they are indispensable, as no foreign substances 
can he inhaled when they arc worn. 

The Respirators are sold subject >o approval after trial, 
and if not satisfactory the prica will be refunded. Price, 
$8.00 each or 980. 00 per dozen. Sent post-paid to ain 
address on receipt of price. 

Address communications and orders to 

T. E. JEWELL. Sole Agent, 
330 Pine St (Boom 6) San Francisco. 

jCfT'Send for Descriptive Circulars containuig Testi- 
monials of well-known ] allies who are at present using 
them. 



DEWEY & CO. { 2 ^e^ r K f^ut% F - } PATENT AGENTS. 



54 



pACIFie fxHJRALo f> RESS. 



[Jolt 18, 1885 



Commission jvierchapts. 



rsrsR MRYRR. 



LOUIS MRYSH. 



MEYER BROS. & CO., 

Importers and 

Wholesale Grocers 

And Dealers in 

tm- TOBACCO AND CIGARS "» 

412 FRONT STREET 

Front St. Block, Wet. Clay ft Washington, San Franolsco 
iVSpeclal attention given to country traders. 
P. O. Box 1940. 



CHRISTY 4 WISE, 



AGENTS PUB 



WOOL GROWERS 

AND 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

FOR TIIK SALE OF 

Wool, Hides, Tallow, Grain, Live 
Stock, etc. 

A Large Supply of Bucks Constantly on 
Hand. - Also. Wool Bags, Twine, Dips, 
and all Ranch Supplies, fur- 
nished customers at 
Lowest Rates. 

OFFICE ANN WARKIH >l 'SK : 

N. £. cor. Fifth atd Townsend Sts., S. F 

H I espcrience warrants us in promising -iti.- 
factory results. 

£3TWe are always prepared to make liberal advances 
on Wool at lowest rates of interest. 

MOORE, FERGUSON & CO., 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

WOOL, GRAIN, FLOUR, 

ETC., ETC. 
Members of the San Francisco Produce Exchange 
810 Calilornla St., San Francisco. 
Liberal advances made on consignments 

Geo. Mob how. | Established ISM] 1!ko. F. Morrow 

GEORGE MORROW & CO., 

HAY and GRAIN 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

39 (Jlay Street and 28 Commercial Street, 

Sas Francisco, CaL. 

jf-rT SHIPPING ORDERS A SPECIALTY.-^! 

RBMOVAIj. 

DALTOlT BROS., 

Commission Merchants 

AND DIALERS IN 

CALIFORNIA AND ORECON PRODUCE, 

GREEN AND DRIED FRUITS. 

Grain, Wool, Hides, Beans, and Potatoes. 

808 and 310 DAVIS ST., 
P. 0. Box 1930. SAN FRANCISCO. 

KT CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. ■» 



Grangers' Business Association, 



SHIPPING AND 

No. 38 California St 



HOUSE, 

San Francisco. 



Consignments of GRAIN, WOOL, DAIRY PRODUCE, 
Dried Fruit, Live Stock, etc, solicited, and liberal ad- 
vances made on the same. 

Careful and prompt attention paid to orders for the 
purchasing of Grain ami Wool Sacks, Wagons, Agricult- 
ural Implements, Provisions, Merchandise, and supplies 
of all kinds. 

Warehouse and Wharf: 

At "THE GRANGERS'," Contra Costa Co 

Grain received on storage, for shipment, for Bale od 
consignment. Insurance effected and liberal advance* 
made at lowest rates. Farmers may rely on their grain 
being closely and carefully weighed, and on having their 
other interests faithfully attended to. 




STUDABECKERS TAILORS' SQUARE. 

A Perfect System of Dress Cutting, 
OmcE— 224 Stockton Street. San Francisco. 

<s"-Patterns cut to measure. Received diploma at 
Mechanics' Institute Fair. 1883. 



.Comic Transparent and 25 (no i alike) Chromo Cards, 
name on, 10c. Present froc. A nines, t'assvillc.O. 



25 



LAND CLEARIN G WITH JUD SON POWDER. 

RAILROAD MEN, FARMERS AND VITIOULTURISTS HAVE, 

hv practical experience, found that the JUDSON FOWDKR especially, is the best adapted to REMOVE 
STUMPS and TREES. 

FROM 5 TO 20 POUNDS OF THIS POWDER will always bring anv sized stump or tree with 
roots clear out of the ground. The EXPENSE IS LESS THAN ONE-HALF the cost of Grubbing. 

In most instances, Giant Powder, or any other "High Explosive," is too uick, and ordinary Blasting Powder 
not strong enough. 

UFV.it particulars how to use the same, apply to 

BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., General Agent* 

GIANT POWDER COMPANY, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



" ACME " 

DOUBLE 
GANG. 



PULVERIZING HARROW, 
^Clod Crusher, 
and Leveler. 




ipdmills, ttc 



The "ACME" subjects the soil to the action of a Steel Crusher an I l.evoler, and to the Cutting, 
Lifting, Turning process of dotthte ijanjs of CAST STEEL COULTERS, the peculiar shape and arrange- 
nieiit of which give immense cult tag power. Thus the three operations of crushing lump>, leveling 
ground and thoroughly pulverizing the soil are performed at the same time. The entire ah- 



>fT tr 



seme of Spikes or Spring Teeth avoids pulling up rubbish. It is especially adapted to Inverted sod and 
hard clay, where other Harrows utterly fail; v orks perfectly OB light soil, and is the only Harrow that euts over 
the entire surface of the ground. We make a variety of sizes, 3 to IS feet wide. 

The "ACME" is in practical use in ncirly every Agricultural County 00 the Pacific Coast, and ha.- pro\cd itself 
t.. be just the tool for us. in VI X E YARDS, ORCHARDS, ami GRAIN FIELDS. 

£*-SeDd for Pamphlet containing Thousands of Testimonials from 48 different States 
and Territories. 

NASH ote BROTHER, 

Manufactory and Principal Office, Milllngton, N. J. 

N. B. — Pamphlet "TILLAGE IS .YIANl'RE, and Otiikr Essays," sent free to parties who name this paier. 
FOR SALE ON THE PACIFIC COAST BY 
Geo. Bull & Co., 21 and 23 Main St., San Francisco; G. B Adams & Son. San Gabriel 
Cal.; Staver & Walker, Portland. Or, and Walla Walla, W. T. 



HORTON & KENNEDY'S 

FAMOUS 

ENTERPRISE 

Self- Regulating 

WINDMILL 

Is recognized a 

TBI BlST. 

Always gives satisfaction. SIMPLE, 
STRONG and DURABLE in all parts. 
Solid Wrought-iron Crank Shaft with 
doiblr HKARiNOH for the Crank to 
work in, all turned and run in adjust- 
able babbitted boxes. 

Positively Self-Regulating, 

With no coil springs, or springs of any kind. No little 
rods, joints, levers, or anything of the kind to get out of 
order, as such things do. Mills in use 6 to 12 yean In 
good order now, that have never cost one cent for repairs. 
All genuine Enterprise Mills for the Pacific Coast trade 
come only through this agency, and none, whether of 
the old or latest pattern, arc genuine except those bear- 
ing the "Enterprise Co." stamp. Look out for this, ae 
Inferior mills are being offered w ith testimonials applied 
to them which were given for ours. Prices to suit the 
times. Full particulars free. Best Pumps, Feed Mills, 
etc., kept in stock. Address, 

HORTON & KENNEDY 

GENERAL OFFICE AND SUPPLIES (as always before), 
LIVERMORE, ALAMEDA CO., CAL. 

San Francisco Agency JAMES LINFORTH 

116 Front St., San Francisco. 




MERY'S IMPROVED PIONEER 



BARLEY CRUSHER 

Using tli e Benoit Corrugated Rollers. 



STILL AT THE FRONT! 





This Mill has been in use on this Coast for 5 years, 

TAKEN THE PREMIUM AT THE STATE FAIR 

Four years in succession, and has met with general favor, 
there now being 

OVER 175 OF THEM IN USE IN CALIFORNIA I 

It is the most economical and durable Feed Mill in use. I am sole manu- 
facturer of the Corrugated Roller Mill. The Mi'ls are all ready to mount 

on wagons. 

I thank the public for the kind patronage received thus far, anil hope for a continuance of the same. 

Xj. MSRY, CHICO IRON WORKS, Cliico. Oal. 



REDUCKD PRICES OF 

THE HALLADAY WIND-MILL 

WITHOUT TOWER: 

10-foot wheel U| 00 

p'-foot wheel MS 00 

13-foot wheel 100 00 

tt; - for circulars. 

AUSTIN BROS., Agents. 

Stockton, Cal. 

a >B2. 
■coo 
* 4 * 
9 a 

3 9 n 
£, » g 

*e» 

■ « 

5 2 
ae 

HORSE POH KIIS WI \ I>>IIEES, TANKS 
and all kinds of Pumping Machinery built to order 
X^Send for Catalogue and Price List. 

F. W. KROGH & CO., 

51 Beale St.. San Francisco. 




MRS. E. E. KELSEY 

Practical Dress and Cloak Maker, 

CUT BY THE S. T. TAYLOR SYSTEM. 

ALBO, 1'ATTKRNS ITT TO OK1IKK. 

Three Doors South of Postofficc. BERKELEY, CAL. 



McLEAN'S GRAIN- SAVING ATTACHMENT. 




Cut Representing McLean's Grain-Saving Attachment as it appears when attached to a Separator 



THESE ATTACHMENTS 



Guaranteed 



SAVE GRAIN 



Any S parator, 

No matter wbat make or 
how much improved 
it may lie. 



*ff"For further informa- 
tion, prices, etc., address 

N. McLEAN, 

Watsonville, Cal. 



Joly 18, 1885] 



fACIFie F^URAb pRESS. 



55 



geed?, Wants, ttc. 



LEONARD COATES. 



S. M. TOOL. 



NAPA VALLEY 

NURSERIES 

COATES & TOOL, Prop'rs. 

For Season of 1885-86 

We offer a splendid assortment of 

FRUIT TREES AND GENERAL 
NURSERY STOCK, 

OUR LEADING SPECIALTY WILL BE: 

THE 

"CENTENNIAL" CHERRY, 

A California Seedling of Napoleon Bigar- 
reau, fruited first in 1876, and now 
for the first time offered 
for sale. 

The "Centennial" Cherry resembles the Napoleon In 
color, but is nearly one-third larger, the seed is much 
smaller, and it is so film that it will stind shipping to 
almost any part of the United States. It is known and 
recommended by all the leading hort culturists who have 
seen it. A. T. Hatch, Esq. , ol Suisun, the well known 
fruitgrower, and Vice-President ol the California Horti- 
cultural Society, says, after seeing the fruit on the trees, 
and thoroughly testing it: "It far exceeds my highest 
expectations; it could not be better, and is all and more 
than you claim for it." Full particulars on application. 

ALSO 

500,000 ROOTED RESISTANT 
GRAPEVINE STOCKS 

AT LOW RATES. 



PMJPARTURIENS WALNUT, 

In bearing in our Orchard at 3 years old. 

"Muir" Peach, Glaister Plum, Marshall's 
Seedling, or Red Bellflower Apple, 

And other noted fruits, etc. tfaTSENn for Catalogue. 

COATES & TOOL, 

Napa City, Cal. 

N. B. A few good Agents wanted to can- 
vass for us. C & T. 



ROSENDAHL'S NURSERY, 

Washington Co'ony, Fresno, Cal 

200,000 Fruit Trees and Vines 



ok all kinds. 



Particulars on application. Lowest rate i to the trade. 
Address C. P. WALTON. Sole Agent 

Box sin, Fresno, Cal. 




{ieeds, t>lapt$, ttc, {Seeds, Mapts, ttc, 



ALL ABOUT PIGS. 



THE WHITE ADRIATIC, 



SAN PEDRO, 



WHITE GENOA. 



£3T Send for New Descriptive Circular 
GUSTAV BISEN (FANCHBR CREEK NURSERY), 



FRESNO, CAL. 



Ma 

1,300 Engines now in use. 
40,000 Horse Power now running. 
Sales 2,000 H. P. per month. 

tdTScml for Illustrated Circu'ar and Reference List. 

PARKE & LACY, 

Sole Agents for Pacific Coast & Territories, 
21 and 23 Fremont St., San Francisco. 




Washington Navel 

ORANGES 

EUREKA LEMONS. 



SEND FOR PRICES. 



!Will also contract to bud 
special varieties for future 
delivery in quantities to suit. 
Address : 
BYRON O. CLARK and 
RIGGINS BROS., 
Box 88, Pasadena, Cal. 



If You Want to Save Money and avoid a life of trouble, buy Trees Free from Scale. 



SE 
"53 

3 

"5 

O 
I_ 

o 



SECOND HAND SEPARATOR 

For Sale at a Bargain. 

A 3S-Inch Buffalo Pitts Separator 

With Jackson's Self-Feeder. 

Has heen used about 00 days. Apply to 

H. HORTOP & CO., 

Rutherford, Napa Co., Cal. 

Or to D. N. &.C. A . HAWLEY, No. 501 Market Street 
San Franus.'O. 



.22 <=> 



W. M, WILLIAMS' I 

SEMI-TROPICAL and GENERAL NURSERIES. 

375,000 TREES. 1,000,000 BOOTED VINES. 
FOR THE SEASON OF 1884-85. 



Apples, Pears, Peaches, Apricots, Nectarines, French and Hungarian Prunes, Plums, Figs 
and Cherries. Cypress, Gums, Acacias, Ornamental Shrubs, Greenhouse Plants. 

2,000 of the Genuine Smyrna Fig, imported from the Mediterranean, and proven in Cali- 
fornia this season. Sixtj varieties of Grapes, rooted and cuttings, including all the best Wine 
and Raisin varieties. Catalogue free. 

"W. TVT. WIT iT iIAMg, 

P. O. BOX 175. Fresno, California. 













-i 




CD 




CD 








§ 








-3 




-I 


© 


(U 




=> 








ro" 


s» 


a. 


-o 




=r 




w 


■n 








m 




m 








-i 




o 




3 




tn 




o 




El 







Kieffer's Hybrid, Le Conte and P. Barry Pears, at Reasonable Prices. 



SEEDS 



ALBERT DICKINSON 

DEALER IN 

limothy, Clo'er, Flax, Hungarian, Millet, Hed lop 5 
Eho Crass, Liwn Grass, Or-.hari Grass, Bird Seeds, to 
POP CORN. 

Office, 115 Kinzie St 

o4,io6,io8& no Michigan St CHICAGO. ILL„ 



WAREHOUSES: 
X15, 117 & 119 Kinzie St 




S. W. Corner Kearny and Montgomery Avenue, San Francisco. 

«■ Free Coach to and from the Bouse. J. W. BECKER, Proprietor. 



MONAKCHCArt PKtSS 
IOTOHS BOX CAR $600 
1 MONARCH JR.o»s l »«v.iLisSS0» 
THC 



BALE CAR PRtSS INTtiE 
WORLD. 




THE MONARCH 

— AND — 

JUNIOR MONARCH 



Hay Presses 



(Patented July 22nd, 1884.) 

NO TRAMPING REQUIRED ! 

Parties who think of buying Hay Presses the present 
season, should not fail to send for circulars of the above 
machines, which are destined in a short time to super- 
sede all other baling machines. 

The first named, the MONARCH, is intended for 
making- those small bales for loading box cars with ten 
tons. It is the only Press made that will do this, without 
crushing, grinding, or otherwise damaging the hay. Its 
hales are known iti the San Francisco market as tho 
three-quarter hales, and they bring from one to two dol- 
lars per ton mure in that cit\ than those bales which are 
tied endwise. The MONARCH is fed in largecharg-es 
(two or more forkfuls) and the ha'es are pressed and tied 
sidewise, like the large common bales, which explains 
why the bav is rot crushed or damaged. 

The JUNIOR MONARCH is just about the size 
of my Petaluma Hay Press, and makes a simi'ar bale, 
but it can be run by two men, and does its own tramp- 
ing, and is one-third faster than the Petaluma. The bales 
can be made 50 pounds heavier than Petaluma bales. 

The wooden levers used last year arc replaced with 
wrought-iron ones, and the action of the feed door haa 
been greatly improved. 

A remarkable improvement, which is called 

THE IMPROVED AUTOMATIC HOUSE POWER 

Has been applied to both the Monarch and the Junior 
Monarch presses this season (18S5). Heretofore the de- 
scent of the follower, after each charge, has been gov- 
erned by a brake on the horse-power operated by the 
Iriver Now, by means of a compact, solid little attach- 
ment, weighing but 40 pounds, the descent of the fol- 
lower is controlled in the most perfect manner without 
the attention of anybody, thus saving the labor of one 
man. The action of this improvement (which though 
very simple, is not easily explained on paper,) is really 
very extraordinary. 

Price of Monarch, - $600 
Price of Junior Monarch, - - $500 

Genuine Price or Petaluma Presses made of clear, 
pound White oak, and with Norway iron chains, at 
greatly reduced rates, and as low as the bogus affairs. 

Address : JACOB PRICE, San Leandro, Cal. 
Inventor of the Monarch, Junior Monarch, Petaluma, 
Wizard, Climax and Eagle Baling Presses. 



KELSEY HOUSE, 

OAKLAND, CAL. 

This large and well-known villa has been leased by C. C. Wheeler, of the VVinsor. It has 
been thoroughly renovated th- oughout. The House and Cottages are situated on large and 
beautiful grounds. The Billiard and Reading Rooms have been handsomely fitted up for ladies 
and gentkmen. Jn close proximity is the Perry Seminary for young ladies, the Sackett School, 
the Misses Field's Home School for Young Ladies, California Military Academy, Hopkins' 
Academy, Pagoda Hill Kindergarten, and many other Schools. Cars pass the House every 
seven minutes from Broadway Station to State University. Ten minutes from Broadway and 
forty minutes from San Francisco. Special rates to regular boarders and families. Telephone 
communications to local points free. 

C. O. WHEELER, Proprietor. 




SELF-OPENING AND CLOSING 

AUTOMATIC GATE. 

For simplicity and durability it is the only reliable 
Gate now in use. No complex machinery about it. By 
a simple lever it is thrown off the center of gravity, and 
opens and closes itself by its own weight. A child six 
years old can open and close it sitting in a buggy. 

It is tiik Gatk when driving a skittish horse or young 
colt, or when ladies do their own driving. No Fancy 
Residence should be without them, and every Farmer 
should have them where there is a Gate used. He will 
save time, besides taking the chances of his team leaving 
him while closing the old common Gate. 

These Gates are almost as cheap as any common Farm 
Gate. They are durable, never get out of order, and will 
last a lifetime. 

Send for Circular giving references and Price List. 
Address JOHN AYLWARD. 

p. O. Box 88. Livermore, Alameda Co., Cal. 

Or JAMKS STANLKY, Mission San Jose, Cal. 

County Rights for sale, apply to John Avi.ward. 



Detachable Link Belting 



COMMERCIAL HOTEL, ! For the BEST HONEY EXTRACTOR 



A. & J. HAHN, Prop'rs, 
Noa. 273, 275 , 277 and 279 Main Street, Stockton, Cal. 
Kates, $J. 25 to $3 Per Day. 
Stage offices for Collegeville and Oakdale, Roberta and 
Union Islands, and Lane's Mineral Springs stages. The 
most desirable location In the city. Refurnished and refit 
ted in the best style for tho accommodation of the public. 
Free coach from all trains aqd steamboats to the hotel. 



OB 

BEST WAX EXTRACTOR, 
Or Supplies for the Apiary, 

BIRD TO 

J. D. ENAS, - - - Napa, Cal. 

AND SATS TIMF, AN',/ ,' >■ KIUHT. 



CONVEYOR 
CHAINS 

FOR TIIK 

Pacific Coast Trade 

ALL RIZFS 

Carried in Stock. 

OKDKKs 
PROMPTLY FILLKD. 

STEARNS 

MFG CO., 
Saw-Mill 

Machinery 



29 & 31 Spear 
St.. S. P. 




CONCRETE BUILDINGS. 

SILOS AND RESERVOIRS. 
RAN SOME, 102 Montgomery St., S. F. Send for Circular. 



56 



P ACIFI6 I^URAId pRES 



S. 



{July 18, 1885 



FARMERS, LOOK TO YOUR OWN INTERESTS! 






TKUMAN SACK I'H.EK. 
10 feet $22 50 

16 feet 27 50 




LIGHTNING SACK 
ELEVATOR. 

Price $135 oo 

WARRANTED 

THE BEST 

Practical Stump Puller 

MADE. 

$100 1 REWARD! 

To uny <mc buying^ 

No, 4 or 5 Machine, 



THE CELEBRATED MONARCH POTATO DIGGER. 

Twelve Smart Boys Required to Pick Up Potatoes 
as Fast as it Can Dig.* 

PRICK |is OO 

TRUMAN, ISHAM & CO. WAGON LOADER 

This is a useful machine for Leading or Piling Hay Bales or Sacks 
in high ptai es. or putting them in second stories, or for Loading 
WlgOTO in the Field. SAVKS TIMK ASH LABOR. 

Kvery Farmer should have one. 

■ki< i:. 

Field Elevator?, 16 feet 
lniif;, $35 OO. 

Each additional foot, 50 cents 



APEX HARROW. 

The Best Tillage Tool. 

INDESTRUCTIBLE. 
The Best for Vineyards or Orchards. 
It saves the me of a Plow. 

Weight, l«o pound* Width, « feet. 

Prire, $40 00. 
Neck-yoke and \\ hitHetrccs, when ordered, $».i«t 



If I CM DO) 

Balance a Ton 

\ WITH 

5 lbs, or Less 

On the Lever. 




o 
m 

> 



GO 



PATENT STEEL WIRE BALING TIES. 

(AD JUST ABIC) 



»-3 



3 



CD 



K 




CROSS HEAD. 



T^rnnrrgtfi 3 



No. 4 STUMP PULI.KK $K0 00 



No. 14 — 8 feet 6 inches long (8.35 for ?5o Ties for Monarch Press. 

No. 14—8 feet long S4.00 for 150 Ties for I'ctaluma num. 

No. 14—** feet fi inches long 14-20 for l'.mi Ties for licderick Press. 

No. 14— !) feet 6 inches long !*4.(i."> for L'.^i Ties for llee'crick Pre*, 

,rr Give us the name of the Preas used, or Length of Tie. 



•-3 >-H 

O 
fed 



GO 



Address TRUMAN. ISHAM & CO., 509 and 511 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO : 
Junction Market, Pine, and 
Davis Sts. 



BAKER & HAMILTON, 

IMPORTERS. MANUFACTURERS, AND DEALERS IN 



( SACRAMENTO : 

v Nos. 9, 11, 13, and 15 J 



Street. 



HARDWARE and AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 



PACIFIC IMPROVED DOUBLE-SHAKE FANNING MILL 





NASH & CUTTS IMPROVED GRAIN CLEANER. 



No. 1 Capacity for IS tons, or 600 bushels for 10 hours, weight ISO pounds gab ,,,, 

No. 2 Capacity for 26 tons, or Woo bushels for 10 huirs, weight 14" pounds (5 00 

No. .1 -Capacity for 30 tons, or 1200 bushels for In hours, weight 160 pounds...!.; . . . 40 00 

.1 .. .^, 1 , 1 P ^ C ' F u C_T1 ' is '■' the ,,,rm si/c ' and ,,as »u«ol«n1 aupmAt) lor all ordinarv farm work, which it will do in 

cut most thorough manner. 

* -rah. m' ^ 'l'i"' 1 t ^»»>' '<>"» Mj". tarnished with pulley , if .lesircd. Any farmer having large quantities 

"i .Train 01 seed to clean, will find this Mill invaluable. 

WidOi'of sk-v.' im*,.'"^ s " ,,s,a " tiaI warehouse .Mill.haiiiig great capacity and doing excellent work. 

NO X K«JVAt. W thiS Mi " c * t,:na " vl > ' »»"' »'h«rever it has been used it is universally acknowledged that IT HAS 

Fint»heT™.l' M«« "AT""' •"•" U . h . *" y other st . vlt will convince any one that it is Stronger. Better 
r iniHiieo, and Hon- Durable than any other Mill. 

is held nrnTle to^he^wiM, IS? ~ 10 'I 1 - 6 , ". e8 • hUt hieing the bead or drum, fit Into grooves, and the Mill 
all o h 1 1 8U1.1 B L ,'' i; r V. x «=»«■»'« it -;o,n ucttMg -out of *p,;.re." which will happen sooner or later to 
AlnrC as ahi h, :,, . I " "hese rods the Mill can be easily take „ , ,„ |d ' Ilt „ forlll for 

r^XuZ : ko, . MrSKVti ■ e^r,'"' ; a i "f c r of n,on «»• 

..si ■ Bui, is in. u«rt, awch wo are fully prepared to demonstrate, that it is 

THE BEST WORKING MILL NOW IN USE. 

».«t!'^^ any other Mill, which, in eon- 

esrso&i rr^hVirith'-u" 

only Mill to which is attached ' ' ,be e '"" c8n ,,e perfectly graded, if desired. It is the 

CLARK'S PATENT DOUBLE SHAKE 

any condition, from the dryest to the most damp. ^ ,r0m ODC motio " to another, adapting it to giain in 




SIZE, CAPACITY, AND PRICES. 
There are three sizes of cleaners, designated respectively, Nos. 1, 2, and 3. 

No. 1, hand machine. Capacity 18 tons, or (iOO bushels in 10 hours, weight 130 flu. . . .$30 00 
No. 2, haml (or power, when so ordered). Capacity '2."> tons, or 1000 bushels in 10 hours, 

weight 144 pounds 40 00 

No. 3, either hand or power. Capacity 30 tons, or 1200 bushels iu 10 houre, weight 

105 pounds 50 00 

We recommend No. 3 for warehouse purposes. 

The importance of having a cleaner that will remove cheat, barley, oats, etc., from wheat 
cannot be too highly prized by those who are compelled to use a Crain Cleaner. \A'c claim and 
warrant that "The Improved Nash B Cutts (irain Cleaner" will cleau more grain of any kind in 
a given time, with less labor and trouble, and more thoroughly, than any other cleaner. 

Many ask why we claim that no other Cleaner can equal this one. The question is easily- 
answered. Other cleaners are made for other localities, and the fact that they suit other mar- 
kets is sufficient evidence that they will not suit California, because of the difference in climate 
and grain; and as we have the oniy legitimate grain cleaners manufactured on the coast, our 
claims are abundantly substantiated. 






TWENTY I»AC3rIS EDITIOTU. 




Vol. XXX— No. 4.] 


SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 1885. 


( $3 a Year, in Advance 

1 Sin<ii,k Copies, 10 Cts. 





Beet Sugar in California. 

California has now the only beet sugar factory 
in operation in the United States. This credit- 
able fact is given due prominence in a very 
interesting special re- 
port by Prof. H. W. 
Wiley on "The Sugar 
Industry of the United 
States," which has just 
been issued by the De- 
partnientof Agriculture 
at Washington. The 
engravings on this page 
are reproduced from 
Prof. Wiley's report, 
and will be viewed 
with much interest by 
our readers, for com- 
paratively few of them 
have visited the estab- 
lishment, which has 
been unobtrusively pro- 
gressing for the last few 
years, demonstrating 
the fact that sweetness 
can be profitably drawn 
from California soil. 

We present the en- 
graving at this time to 
accompany a very in- 
teresting essay by John 
L. Heard on beet sugar 
on the Pacific Coast, 
which may 1)2 found on 
page 05 of this issue. 
Mr. Beard lives near 
the factory and has 
grown beets for its use, 
and may therefore 
cluim to be personally 
familiar with the enter- 
prise which he advo- 
cates. Certainly the 
subject is worthy of 
careful consideration. 
As we have formerly 
stated in the Ruual the 
Alvarado factory is 
owned by the Standard 
Sugar Company, which 
was incorporated id 
1879. The Company" 
consisted of A. E. 
Davis, U. F. Giffin, 
H. Dyer, Prescott, 
Scott & Co., J. P. 
Dyer and Robert N. 
Craves, with a capital 
of flOO.'OOO. It was 
soon ascertained that 
more capital was needed 
and the company re- 
incorporated under the 
name of the Standard 
Sugar Refinery, with a 
capital stock of $200,- 
000. The olficers are: 
O. F. Giftin, president; 
J. P. Dyer, vice-presi- 
dent; K. H. Dyer, gen- 
eral superintendent ; W. F. 
trustees, O. F. Gittin, R 



company's work. The factory itself is shown ! which have had experimental existences, there 
in the upper engraving, and the lower one ! have been losses from frozen beets; in California 
will give some idea of the mass of material i the beets may become too hot. California is 



which passes through its 
fortunately, so large a pile 



processes, 
of beets 



Un- 
not 



famous for unusual things. Fortunately, it is 
very easy to put the beets in smaller piles and 




BEET SUGAR FACTORY AT ALVARADO, ALAMEDA COUNTY. CAL. 





TWENTY THOUSAND TONS OF SUGAR BEBTS AT THE FACTORY IN ALVARADO. 



iDgalls, secretary; 
N. Craves, J. P. 
Dyer, G. H. Waggoner, and E. H. Dyer. This 
company has made a success of the business 
from the start. Mr. Board's essay gives a 
sketch of some of the important features of the 



a safe arrangement, for California seasons 
are peculiar. The unusual mildness of the 
last winter caused the beets in parts of the 
pile to heat aud their sugar contents were in- 
terfered with. In ordinary winters no evil 
would have resulted. At the Kastern factories, 



thus prevent their heating. Jack Frost is not 
so easily cheated of his victims. Prof. Wiley's 
report treats also of sorghum, cane and maple 
sugars. It is one of the most interesting which 
has been issued by tho Department of Agri- 
milture. 



Feed Grains Again. 

The late report of the San Francisco Produce 
Kxchange shows that the consumption of barley 
the past year has been 32,000 centals more than 
was raised — the excess 
being from the crop of 
1884. The crop of last 
year having been, no 
doubt, the largest ever 
raised in California, 
and that not sulHcient 
for cmrrent use, it 
looks as if the present 
short crop will fall far 
short of supplying the 
local wants for this 
year. 

The arrivals from all 
sources of barley in 
this city for this month 
to date 22 daj s, has 
b^en 65.235 centals, or 
2000 centals daily, 
while the average con- 
sumption ranges ;■};">< K > 
to 4O00 centals daily, 
at which rate the stock 
of barley on hand in 
the city will soon be 
exhausted. Receipts of 
barley since the first 
of July have been only 
two-thirds as much as 
wa» received during 
the first three weeks of 
July last year. 

The arrivals of oats 
for the same period 
have been 4!l,788 cen- 
tals, or 2217 centals 
daily, while the con- 
sumption averages 2000 
centals daily -showing 
a gain during the past 
22 days of 217 centals 
daily. The oat crop of 
California is principally 
from the coast counties; 
and this year the crop 
will be very light, con- 
sequently Oregon and 
Washington Territory 
will have to be de- 
pended on for oats. 
Last year, about half 
of the oats received 
came from California, 
and the remainder frjm 
the north coast ; and 
whether the north will 
increase their produc- 
tion enough to cover 
the shortage from Cali- 
fornia, is the matter 
that will control the 
market. The oat crop 
of Oregon does not 
reach this market uu- 
til some time after har- 
vest. Now, with the 
oat crop in the chief oat districts of California 
very short indeed, and the Oregon crop not to 
be expected for some months to come, it appears 
very likely that there may be a short [supply of 
oats and an improvement in prices during the 
full. 




58 



pACIFie RURAb fRESS. 



[Jdly 25, 1885 



C[0F^ESP0NDEJM©E. 

Correspondents are alone reipnnsiblc for tlieir opinions. 



Arizona Notes. 

Editors Phkss: Many of the small deserts 
that were onee given place in the old sohool 
atlases have disappeared from the later edi- 
tions, and nearly all of the large ones are 
much reduced in area. Most countries not 
well known were usually represented as unin- 
habitable wastes. The greater part of Ameri- 
can territory between the Rocky mountains and 
J'acific Ocean was once supposed to be such, 
aud that region now known as Arizona was in- 
cluded in the most barren part. It is true that 
a large section of the Territory deserves to be 
so classified, but a great area has within itself 
the means of transformation to something bet- 
ter. In Southern Arizona are extensive ard 
fertile river valleys through which large streams 
run, affording a sufficient supply of water to 
make a produc ive agricultural region of what, 
without the artificial application of moisture to 
the soil, was a series of wide deserts. In Cen- 
tral and Northern Arizona there are no large 
valleys or rivers, except the Colorado which 
flows along the bottom of a great chasm a mile 
below the surface, but there are a number of 
smaller valleys, which, like those ot Southern 
California, are without running water during a 
great part of the year. The valley in which 
Riverside, in San Bernardino county, Califor- 
nia, is situated might have been called a desert 
a few years ago during the summer and autumn 
months, but enterprising parties diverted the 
water of a small stream from its spongy bed 
and conveyed it to the dry soil, and to-day 
travelers say the colony of Riverside has no 
rival for beauty and productiveness in the 
world. The northern half of Arizona is full of 
just such desert valleys as that of Riverside, 
but one great essential is wantiug here — enter- 
prise. 

Suggestive Sights. 
The writer has recently visited a number 
of these valleys and the surrounding region, 
starting out with the impression — the re- 
sult of information imparted by old resi- 
dents — that the northern half of the terri- 
tory is totally unfitted for agriculture, and that 
large districts cannot even be made available 
for grazing, l'assing through a hilly and par- 
tially timbered region northward from Prescott, 
a number of small farms were passed, where 
crops were growing well without irrigation, 
although in places water was conducted to 
vegetable gardens. These little green patches, 
hidden in sheltered coves among the grey stony 
hills, were suggestive of emeralds set in a slab 
of granite. At first one wonders at seeing 
them, but later is puzzled to know why there 
are not more. Several winding valleys are 
passed through, having a rich loamy soil, and 
bearing a heavy growth of vegetation, notice- 
able among the latter being plants that flourish 
in a moist soil only. There are thousands of 
acres that would produce hay and grain without 
irrigation in any but the driest year, and for 
such crops there is always a good demand at 
high prices near home. One old resident said 
that it was a poor country to grow hay in, and 
yet there were hundreds of acres of wheat and 
rye ready to cut, of good length, and standing 
thickly on the groun.i, within a few miles of his 
home. Another resident in Williamson 
valley, who was having a large amount of 
excellent hay hauled from his fields, de- 
clared that although he had never 
grown better hay in any part of the Union it 
was impossible to make a success of grain; but 
within sight was a field of wheat turning yel- 
low which would have returned a large yield of 
grain within two weeks if allowed to ripen. 
Water in this valley is within ft to 10 feet from 
the surface and a small stream which runs 
through a portion of the farming region was 
not used for irrigation w here the writer passed 
through. Alfalfa, we were informed, would 
not do well in the northern part of Arizona, and 
yet it is cultivated successfully in many places. 
Remarking that it should be a jood country for 
certain kinds of deciduous fruits, the answer 
was that "they do well in the waim liver val- 
leys south, but will not grow in the higher re- 
gions." The same day in these same "higher 
regions" we noticed apple, peach and other 
trees, blackberries, etc., in small orchards 
thrifty-looking and Hearing a fair crop of fruit. 
Williamson valley is colder than some of the 
others visited and trosts are liable to appear 
during any month in the year. The same is 
also true of a large portion of this part of Ari- 
zona. Nevertheless, several crops sensitive to 
frost are grown every year with profit at an 
altitude of 5,000 to 0,000 feet. 

Grazing. 

Rig Chino valley and the country surround- 
ing is devoted exclusively to stock raising. 
The cattle roam at will over hill and vale, the 
owners interfering with them only for a short 
period during the marking and branding season. 
The region has the appearance of anything but 
a desert, although there are no running streams 
to be seen. The cattle are watered from deep 
wells dug in the middle of the valley, pumps 
being run constantly to supply them. Rut the 
whole region surrounding is covered with a 
heavy growth of nutritious bunch and other 
grasses, and although it is the driest part of 



the dry season, the summer rains not having 
commenced, so far as the eye can reach is an 
unbroken stretch of green. The slopes of the 
distant ranges are clothed with juniper, but the 
low gravelly hills on either side of Chino valley 
are bare of timber or brush, although covered 
with green feed knee high. A short distance 
south of the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad are 
stacks of wild hay several miles from the near- 
est dwelling put up last year. The grass is cut 
after the rainy reason when it stands high aud 
thick and makes excellent hay. Owing to the 
scarcity of water there are few cattle near the 



the trees presenting a fine appearance. The 
apricots set full of fruit but were frozen in the 
general freeze of April. Other fruit was not in- 
jured, and the Rartletts are loaded with fine 
fruit; this fact has determined him to plant 1 
more Rartlett pears. He has set out a new 1 
orchard of prunes, and will add more. His 
blackberries are choice and hang full. The 
oldest trees in the orchard are of five and six 
years, but the majority are three and four 
years old. There were sold last year of nectar- 
ines and peaches, from less than an acre, over 
$'200 worth, some of the trees being only three 



upper end of the valley, and little effort has years old. The fruit was of an excellent qual 



been made to obtain water from below the sur 
face. The branch Prescott and Arizona Cen- 
tral Railroad, now being built to ran southward 
from the A. ft P., may cause an effort to be 
made to develop this favored region 



ity, many of the peaches measuring 13 and 14 
inches in circumference. 

The next place visited was Mr. Green's, some 
three miles below, at the junction of Stony and 
Rriscoe creeks. This is quite a picturesque 



Stjckmen are not more enterprising than tin-, spot, caused by Stony creek turning to the left 

- 1. -j ti j 1 . c . ,u n n *... n ».... „„.i * u u * u —~ — 1... _ _ 



agriculturists. They declare that the country 
is already becoming rapidly overstocked, 
although there is a vast area of unoccupied 
range. Those places where running water ex- 
ists are occupied, although the pasturage may 
be poor. Porlions of the Territory support so 
scaut a growth of herbage that twenty acres are 
necessary for each animal. In the upper Chino 
valley country three or four acres would be 
sufficient for one head, but there are no streams 
there, and the easy-going Arizona cattle man 
would rather leave this excellent grazing land 
unoccupied ihan be at the trouble or expense of 
sinking for water. There is a section north of 
the valley where it would probably be some- 
what difficult to secure water, the country be- 



am! passing through the range by a narrow, 
rocky channel, with high walls of mossy rock. 
In the south end of the orchard s and* a beauti- 
ful black walnut, from which was gathered last 
year §30 worth of walnuts. This tree is said 
to be 14 years' old. In this orchard are growing 
as fine trees as can be found in the State, from 
3 to L3 years old. The apples, pears, peaches 
and plums were bending under the burden of 
fruit. One apple tree (a B;llflower) is de- 
serving of special mention; 2,')00 pounds of 
choice fruit was taken from the tree last year, 
worth two and a half cents a pound. These 
apples were pronounced by former residents of 
Vac a villi.' the finest in appearance and quality 
that they had seen in the State. The tree is 



ing of volcanic formation and the sub strata as loaded with fruit and presents a beautiful pic- 
well as the surface soil exceedingly porous. In j ture. All the apple trees in this orchard are 
some of the small gulches there is no evidence fine specimens of beauty, health and fruitful 



that water runs to the valley below at any time 
of the year, the rain being absorbed almost as 
quickly as it falls. A very small proportion of 
the precipitation in that volcanic region feeds 
any surface stream. On the southern side of 
the valley the formation is different. Ry sink 
ing deep enough, water -perhaps artesian water 
-could be obtained from each well to supply as 
many cat le as could be pastured within a ra- 
dius of four or five miles. There are several 
valleys, surrounded by mountains whose tops 
are capped with snow during the winter 
months, that appear to be as favorable as any 
of the valleys of Southern California for suc- 
cessful artesian borings. Among them may be 
mentioned a large plain embracing portions of 



Hess. I would like to have a photograph of 
some of Mr. Green's two-year-old plum trees; 
they were literally covered with fruit. We. 
sampled the Royal Ceorge and Crawford 
peaches, and found them of excellent flavor — 
fully equal to any tasted in Vacaville during a 
six years' residence in that place. The Rriggs 
K irly peaches were all gone, but we were in- 
formed that the fruit was fully equal to what 
we had eaten. 

On the next place below Mrs West's, we 
came to another orchard, where a similar scene 
was presented us as at Mr. Green's. Trees and 
vines all thrifty and full of fruit. At Elk 
creek post office, just below Mrs. West's 
place, we visited the orchard of Mr. Houston 



Yavapai, Yuma and Maricopa counties, and The young trees here have made a marvelous 

containing an area of two or three million growth, the new wood measuring over seven 

acres. At present it is uninhabited and unoc- feet on one tree. I counted the plums on the 

cupied for any purpose, although it could be end of a limb, and there were 19 on a twig six 

made a valuable addition to the pastoral lands inches in length. Here, as elsewhere, the trees 

of the Territory if water were obtainable, were breaking under their load. 
There are other such bodies of land that are I Adjoining this orchard I saw a piece of al- 

now valueless. Among the foothills of some of falfa three years old, which was ready for the 

the ranges are also to be found good grazing third cutting. This piece had never been irri 

landB where water enough for all the stock that gated, being on upland, and it was as beautiful 

could be maintained thereon could be provided as any I had ever seen. I greatly desired to 

with little labor and at slight expense. The visit the place of Mr. . I ulian, farther down the 

extension of Arizona's agricultural and pas- creek, but had not the time. He has already 

toral arras and the successful employment of planted several thousand trees and vines, and 

much of that now in use must depend largely will, I am informed, go on enlarging in this 



upon the development of the water supply, 
which work has been scarcely more than initi- 
ated as yet. 

The Future. 
The writer is not well enough acquainted 
with the country to speak authoritatively con- 
cerning the matter, but thinks it safe to ven 



direction. 

The possibilities of this section are very 
great; it seems to be the natural home of the 
vine. The climate is charming. The dreaded 
northers are scarcely felt. The thermometer 
averages 10 to 12 degrees lower than in this 
valley iu the hot season. It seems to be a 



ture the assertion that a considerable portion of specific for asthma,and the location is as beauti 
Chino valley and flats in the adjacent hills will ful as can be found anywhere in the State; and 
be farmed in the near future. The soil is rich some day the good people living there will 



and friable, in places almost ashy, intermixed 
with gravel, and could be plowed the first time 
in the middle of the dry season. It never 
bakes, although it contains an admixture of 
clay, said to have the characteristics of heavy 
j adobe when wet. Where bushes grow thriftily, 
; fruit trees adapted to a cool clime like this 
j should also grow, and where forage grasses 
I are luxuriant in growth and green and 
juicy in midsummer, cereals should thrive 
I and ripen and yield an abundant har- 
I vest. The fact is, Arizonans do not ap- 
preciate or understand the capabilities of 
their own country, aud the opinion of a stranger 
is probably worth as much as that of the aver- 
age "old settler,'' who is not yet aware of the 
fact that excellent hay, grain and fruits are 
grown in his own neighborhood. 
Prescott, A. T. Geo. W. Stewart. 

Stony Ureek Region, Colusa County. 

Editors Parse:— It was my good fortune 

last week to spend a few days ou "Stony creek," 
in the western portion of Colusa county. If I 
am not mistaken it will prove a second Yaca 



wake up to find their section famous. I do not 
own a foot of land (but wish I did), and write 
only for the benefit of those who have an in- 
terest in the prosperity of our State, and to 
give information concerning what I believe to 
be the most beautiful part of Colusa county. 
Willows. A. J. Comi tiin, M. I). 



JXJhE J3>I>RY. 



Starting in the Bee Business. -No. 6. 

Products of the Apiary 
Editors Press: — Having the apiary arranged 
and stocked, and the honey house built, it now 
behooves us to consider the products of our en- 
terprise. Starting at the head, and with the 
article which without doubt brings the best 
price in proportion to quantity, viz., quern- 
bcei, it might be urged that the breeding of 
these should be left to specialists. There is, 
however, no reason why not every bee-keeper 
should raise some extra queens from his best 
ville, and as your paper is a good medium for ' colonies, either to improve his own stock or to 

sell to his less fortunate or less enterprising 



here in California there are localities where the 
honey is not suitable for sale, but which are 
particularly adapted for the breeding of bees. 
This is mainly in the low valley lands where 
there is an abundance of willows, alfilerilla, and 
other early honey or pollen-producing plants. 
Although we are not subject to such winter 
and spring losses as Eastern bee-keepers, it 
might pay farmers, with a taste for the bee- 
business and rightly situated, to raise bees for 
sale. 

* Wax. 
The question has been raised of the practica- 
bility and advisability of turning the energies of 
the bees into the production of wax, instead of 
that of honey. Wax is now used so extensively 
by the bee-keepers themselves for the manu- 
facture of comb foundation, and since the ad- 
vent of the honey extractor so much less is pro- 
duced now than formerly, that it sometimes is 
quite scarce and difficult to obtain. The price, 
however, does not seem to advance in propor- 
tion to the scarcity, and accordiug to a number 
of careful experiments and tests it is generally 
conceded that it requires more material, time 
and labor than is compensated for by the cur- 
rent price, and that it does not, therefore, pay 
to make a specialty of producing wax. It is 
doubtful whether the price of beeswax will ad- 
vance materially, as long as there are vegetable 
and mineral wax, besides other articles, which 
for many purposes can be used as substi- 
tutes. 

Comb or Extracted Honey. 
To the common bee-keeper the question then 
resolves itself into whether he shall produce 
comb or extracted honey. If he is situated 
near a good city market, or has superior ship- 
ping lacilities, comb honey no doubt pays 
the best. There is less labor to the bee- 
keeper in the production of this article, and 
much of the work, such at the making 
of sections, cases and comb foundation, 
can be done during the winter. One 
man can care for a far greater number 
of colonies run for comb honey, than where ex- 
tracted honey is the object. As a rule, comb 
honey also finds a readier sale, in !a t, as a 
recent writer said, "A good article of comb 
honey will sell itself." The drawbacks are, 
that comb honey lequires extra careful hand- 
ling, is difficult to keep in good order, and still 
more difficult to transport, for which reison a 
very high rate of freight is demanded. Neither 
is it as certain a crop as extracted honey. 
While the producer of the latter article can 
supply his bees with a set of empty combs and 
thus, even in a season of comparative scarcity, 
secure every drop of honey, which the bees do 
not need for their owii sustenance, the comb for 
comb honey must be a fresh production, either 
from the natural wax secretion of the bees, or 
from extra thin comb foundation manufactured 
for that purpose. When honey is scarce, bees 
will not build any comb, even when furnished 
with comb foundation, and the would-be pro- 
ducer of comb honey therefore finds himself 
minus his expected crop, while his neighbor, 
who works for extracted honey, may at least 
get something. The production of extracted 
honey entails more labor, requires more help 
with the same number of colonies, and calls for 
greater expense in the way of cans, labels, ap- 
paratus, etc. Extracted honey does not sell as 
readily as comb honey, is not as highly es- 
teemed, brings a far lower price, and the price 
is often further depressed by the objection to its 
tendency to granulate, although this objection 

' will probably wear away, as consumers become 
more familiar with the principles of this prop- 
erty and learn that granulation is the best test 
of the purity of extracted honey. 

Honey which has been extracted when fully 
ripened by the bees, and it should never be ex- 
tracted earlier (several writers to the contrary, 
notwithstanding), and hermetically sealed in 
suitable pickages, will keep indefinitely and 
requires no further care, except to keep the 
packages outwardly clean. With ordinary care 
it can be transported any distance; in the 

( candied state it will bear even the roughest 
kind of handling; and the freight charges should 
not be more than for syrup or molasses. With 
a good supply of extra combs for the supers the 
beekeeper can often secure two or three times 
as much extracted honey, as he would of comb 
honey. Extracting has a tendency to reduce 
swarming, and he who works for extracted 
honey and already has as many colonies as he 
desires or can care for, will find this a decided 
relief. 

It would make this article too long to go into 
the details of the production of honey, and I 
shall therefore postpone the discussio'n ot this 
subject until later numbers. 

W.M. Ml Til R.VSMfSSEN. 

Independence, C'nl. 



circulating information of this kind, I send you 
the result of my observations. 

The first place visited was the ranch of W. 
S. Anderson, Esq., one of your subscribers, I 
believe. His place of (140 acres lies on the east 
side of the stream, which is here about 40 yards 
wide, and affording an abundance of pure water, 



neighbors. In a subsequent article I shall have 
more to say upon this subject. 

Bees. 

Another industry, which within the last few 
years has sprung up in the Eistern States, is 
the raising and selling of bees by the pound. 
During protracted and severe winters many 



yet I was told that the water was the lowest in colonies perish, and perhaps even a greater 



14 years, on account of so little snow on Snow 
mountain, where the stream takes iu rise. 
Mr. Anderson has a di ch carrying .300 inches, 
but uses the water for garden, alfalfa and 
berries only. 

Here I saw several acres in alfalfa cut last 
time two weeks ago, and now over a foot high. 
There are also some three or four acres in fruit, 



number "spring-dwindle." The bee-keepers 
are left with their depopulated hives and combs 
on hand, and naturally desire to restock them 
for another season's operations. Those who 
have been fortunate to carry their bees through 
without serious loss, find a ready sale for all 
the bees they can spare, and some are doing a 
quite extensive business in that line. Even 



Sick Bees. 

Editors Press:— I see iu the Press of .lune 
'20th that the beekeepers had a picnic at Han- 
ford, and discovered "sick bees or yellow 
banded bees." A few years ago I had a stand 
of bees which dwindled away to nothing. All 
young bees hatched were small, light colored, 
and came wrong end up in the cell. (>ood bees 
carriel them out of the hive and killed them or 
threw them away. The cause was they were 
sired by a wild bee that inhabits the earth, in 
places very numerous. The cross is not a good 
one, as by it 1 lost all my bees, not knowing 
that I ought to have a new queen impregnated 
by a good drone. Elmwoktii. 

Belleville, Tulare Co. 



P ACIFI6 f^URAlo p RESS 



Jdly 25, 1885.] 



Poultry *^Tare>. 



Hints to a Beginner. 

Editors Press: — For the information of " A 
Beginner," I will give some ideas, as they ap- 
pear to me. 

As to the first question, I would suggest an 
incubator on two legs, covered with feathers, 
capacity 13 eggs; in other words, a hen. I 
think if the business is well learned with this 
kind, the want of any other kind will vanish. 
However, I will come to the point aimed at. I 
would say, get one of 120 egg capacity, as it is 
not the largest, and not so costly, and it is not 
the smallest either. The smaller sizes have 
but little advantage over a few hens, while 
with a 120 eg e machine you cau put 20 or 120 
eggs at work, as circumstances call for. 

This size costs about $35, and the next size 
(72 egg) $22, and you can make a good brooder 
for $3 or $4 yourself that will answer for the 
first three weeks as well as those that cost $ 10 
each. 

As to the second question, I am a believer in 
full-blood stock; but I will answer this ques- 
tion in the spirit I think it was asked in. I 
don't always like to advise. I will say this: if 
you have a market for broilers, and are learn- 
ing the business, some good large-bodied hens, 
crossed with a full-blood Leghorn or Ham- 
burg rooster, will give you quick maturing 
broilers, and cost you less money than all full- 
blood fowls; but unless you are in a very 
favored spot, the chicken business just for 
broilers is a poor business. The profits are not 
large. The broiler business pays generally 
only as a part of, or an adjunct to, a poultry 
business where a surplus stock of cockerels can 
be worked off as broilers. My idea is, that 
where all feed has to be bought, that at the age 
for good broilers, taking all things together, 
they cost all they will bring, or very nearly as 
much, unless very good prices are received. I 
would advise you to find how prices are for the 
year in your nearest market, and the cost of 
feed, etc., and see for yourself how it is. 

Perches and drinking vessels can be had at 
small prices. $50 might do on a pinch, with 
some knowledge of the business, and good man- 
agement, but should want to be on the safe side 
and have $75 to $100, so that I should not be 
caught with some little things and have to back 
out for lack of funds. Follow the advice of the 
old farmer, "Be sure you are right and then go 
ahead." A safe business with a dozen fowls is 
of more profit than a wild one with twenty 
dozen. E. C. Clapp. 

South Pasadena. 

From Another Correspondent. 

Editors Press: — In reply to advice wanted 
by a beginner on page 23d of the Rural of 
July 11th, I would strongly advise the person 
about to embark in the poultry business to buy 
a trio of thoroughbred fowls, as you cau pur- 
chase a good trio of the following breeds at $15 
per trio, viz., cock and two hens of Buff Coch- 
ins, Partridge Cochins, Lmgshaus, VVyandottes, 
Light Brahmas or, last but not least, a trio of 
Plymouth Rocks, which would be my choice 
for broilers. You could dispose of your best 
birds to your neighbors to improve their flock 
at $2 each, and your others to the market for 
broilers. I sold a lady, two years ago, a sitting 
of Buff Cochin eggs through my advertisement 
in the Rural Press. She hatched 12 chicks 
from 12 eggs. She sold three roosters for $2.50 
each to her neighbors, and sold eggs from the 
pullets at $2 per dozen to her neighbors, so it 
was a profitable investment for her and, in my 
opinion, it is best for any person about to enter 
the poultry business to buy thoroughbreds to 
begin with and not mongrels. Your first in- 
vestment is your only outlay. I will give the 
person's name who purchased these Buff Cochin 
eggs if the person who is about to embark in 
the poultry business will send me her address. | 
Thos. Waite. 

Britjliton, Sacramento Co., Cal. 



ered capital? For as I understand, a party can- 
not attend alone successfully to more than 500 
birds, and if he has to hire help can he run the 
business successfully, or will the expense of 
such help not be too great for additional num- 
bers? 

There ought to be some tangible way of 
showing what the cost and profits of poultry 
raising will be — in lots of 250 to, say, 10,000 
birds. The practical use of incubators should 
be so clearly demonstrated that the public will 
have entire confidence in them, and not be in- 
clined to prefer the natural process of incuba- 
tion, if that is really so much inferior and more 
expensive. 

I have canvassed this matter here somewhat, 
but I know about as much now as I did before. 
I have met with various parties speaking well of 
incubators, but all desirous to sell the machine 
they have. Second-hand machines of different 
kinds are offered here freely, and from these 
facts the only conclusion remains that the in- 
cubators are practically a failure. One of the 
above machines is offered by a fancier who has 
had 10 years' experience in the business, who 
says the machine has always worked well, and 
yet seems to have no use for it or any other. 
Now, if an experienced man abandons the ma- 
chines it is rather difficult to convince new be- 
ginners that it will be profitable to use them. 

I have been calculating on cost and profit as 



follows: 

500 good Leghorns $250 00 

S acres land, rental per year 60 00 

20 chicken houses, at $5 100 00 

Food per chicken, $1 per year 500 00 

Total $910 00 

Eggs produced of 450 hens, 

each 12 doz. per year, at 25 c. 

average, or $3 S 1 ^ 00 

400 birds resold at 50 c 200 00-1,550 00 



Profit $640 00 



This showing would not be so bad, if it can 
be realized. I have probably figured the first 
cost of the chickens too low and the value of the 
eggs too high. These now are quoted here at 
18 to 20c wholesale, according to to day's 
market report, an exceedingly low price for 
this part of the country, I am told. I have 
not figured in the above the rearing of young 
ones, because I have no data for that. I have 
no idea how many young ones would be likely 
to grow up either if raised by natural or arti- 
ficial incubation, what it would cost to do so, 
and what it might be fair to calculate they will 
bring. 

Now, although this additional profit would 
probably swell the above $640 to, say, $1,000, 
the latter would then represent the utmost a 
man can do in the poultry line during one year, 
all circumstances considered favorable, as 
authorities seem to agree that 500 birds are all 
he can successfully keep. Thus if he is one 
year or ten years in the business he is not 
likely to improve much on the above, while 
he will have increased expenses by a growing 
family, etc. Thus it would seem to me that 
this industry is good so far as it goes in con- 
nection with farming, but not an inviting un- 
dertaking alone. Of course my reckoning 
may be all wrong, but I would like to know 
how to correct it. 

I am aware that fanciers get all sorts of high 
prices both for eggs and for birds, but then they 
will probably be obliged to keep only a small 
number, at least I presume this to be the case 
generally on this coast, from what 1 have so 
far seen and heard. 

I have met with various intelligent and dili- 
gent people who have tried poultry raising both 
for profit and for pleasure for several years, 
and are much dissatisfied with the result. 

Los Angeles. James R. Witte. 

[These points are now open for discussion. — 
Eds. Press.] 

JUhe j5TO<aK ^ARD. 



The Holstein Cow— No. 1. 



of reclaiming the waste and overflowed lands; 
so- that little- by little the sandhills and the 
marshes have been changed into fertile pastures, 
on which succulent and nourishing grasses are 
growing. The traveler of to-day gazing on the 
green meadows of the Netherlands, can scarcely 
imagine that these lands were once rolling 
wastes of sand and of marsh, yet such are the 
facts, and it has taken the labor of generations 
and the expenditure of more than $1,500,000,- 
000 to build the great dikes that protect these 
pastures from the ocean. Of the entire area of 
this strip of land about three-fcurths is pro- 
ductive land, and more than one-half is pasture. 
The same kind of soil and the same general 
features characterize the entire coast line from 
Flanders to Holstein and Schleswig, and if we 
study the races of cattle that have been bred 
for generations on these low marshes or Nether- 
lands, different as they may be in many re- 
spects, yet the same general characteristics are 
found to run through them all. All the great 
exhibitions held in the large cities near these 
Netherlands, the majority of cattle that are 
shown are of a black and white color, which a 
careless observer might take to be of one breed, 
but a closer look convinces him that black-and- 
white cattle are bred in more than one country. 

The black-and-white cattle that are best 
known in America have been imported by two 
associations, the Holstein and the Dutch- Fries- 
ian. The Holstein people claim that the orig- 
inal race of marsh cattle came from Holstein, 
while the Dutch-Friesian people claim that the 
Friesians were the originators of the breed, but 
both factions admit that this breed has been 
kept as a distinct type for more than 2,000 
years, and refer to Roman history to prove 
'heir claims for the long period that it has been 
kept distinct. There is little doubt that more 
than 2,000 years ago the ancestors of the present 
races occupying the Netherlands, settled by the 
the North sea and brought with them many 
cattle, and that ever since that time cattle 
breeding and dairying have been the sole occu 
pation of their descendants. The recent fusion 
of these two associations into the Holstein- 
Friesiau will probably quiet all disputes as to 
what race is the parent of the cattle industry, 
and both will unite in urging the superiority of 
a breed that for more than 2,000 years has been 
bred for dairy purposes exclusively. Although 
the term Holstein is applied to those cattle 
raised on the marsh pastures that border on the 
Black sea, there are certain districts that raise 
superior dairy cows; that is to say, there are 
districts where the cattle are bred for 
dairy purposes chiefly, their beef qualities 
being a secondary consideration. The "Neth- 
erland Cattle Stock Book" says: "Not- 
withstanding the uniformity of the breeds of 
cattle in the Netherlands, there are some dis- 
tinctions — a difference in size, beauty, shape 
and fineness. There is a difference also in color 
and shortness of the horns. Except for color, 
this variety is due to the difference in the com- 
ponent parts and fertility of the soil where the 
cattle are bred and nourished. The largest 
cattle are found on the heavy clay soil of Gronin- 
gen, Friesland, North Holland, South Holland, 
Gelderland, Overvssel, Utrecht, Leelaud, and 
of one pare of North Brabant and Limburg. 
The somewhat smaller but more elegantly 
shaped cattle are found on the sand soil of Gro- 
ningen, on the moors of Lemsterland, along the 
Yssel, and in some rich moor districts of South 
Holland." Of all the districts of the Nether- 
lands, north Holland stands foremost as a 
dairy country, and from there are brough the 
finest of the Holstein cows. The Holstein asso- 
ciation demanded that all cattle to be entitled 
to registry in their herd book must belong to 
"the large, improved black-and-white ca'tle of 
the Holstein breed imported from North Hoi-' 
land and the neighboring provinces." 

Clen Ellon, Sonoma Co. C. D. Stuart. 



Eastern Feeling on Jerseys. 

Editors Press: — Since the late Jersey sales 
at Indianapolis, Ind., and Springfield, 111., 
people seem to think the bottom has about 
fallen out of the Jersey business and that 
prices have reached a point at which they can 
afford to buy. Many who before had no hopes 
of owning Jersey cows are now looking around 
for another public sale at which they may help 
themselves. But if we mistake not, the day for 
Jersey Waterloos is over in the West for the 
next decade. 

True merit, such as the well-bred Jersey 
cow possesses, is sure to be appreciated when- 
ever known. The country is by no means 
nearly supplied with first-class dairy stock. 
The butter-making Jersey cow has but com- 
menced her mission here, and although we have 
no expectation of seeing prices restored to 
what they were a year or more ago, we do 
expect breeders to find a good profit for many 
years to come in rearing Jerseys of the best 
milk and butter strains. Phil. ThriptoN. 

Springfield, 111. 



The Erie Canal for Ships.— The New 
York papers are giving wide publicity to the 
fact that a most determined effort is to be made 
before the next Congress to secure money to en- 
large the Erie canal to accomodate ships. They 
will undoubtedly pool with the Hennepin Canal 
people of the West, and now stand a good 
chance to put through both projects. Both of 
these schemes have in them much merit, and 
ought to be supported by the entire Northwest. 



3^0r^TI©UbTUR_E. 



California Fruit at the East. 

A recent dispatch from Now York brought 
the following New York gossip about Califor- 
nia fruit: 

"There is no longe' any doubt but California 
fruits are running home fruits very hard," said 
R. N. Doe to your correspondent this morning. 
Doe is a member of the firm of Dudley, Clapp & 
Doe, the largest dealers in California green 
fruits in this city. "We have received twice 
the quantity of green fruits from the Pacific 
Coast this year that we did last, and there is a 
constant, growing demand from hotels and 
wealthy people. The quality of the fruit, also, 
is far better than last year. It is arriving, in 
the main, in excellent shape. You see, we 
catch the market here just in the right time to 
unload. It is too early for home fruit, and 
California fills the vacancy. Apricots and nec- 
tarines take the place of peaches and pears, 
finding a ready market. We disposed of a large 
quantity of California fruit during the first six 
weeks. Our plan is to ship by passenger train 
to Chicago, and there divide up, sending con- 
signments to Baltimore, Philadelphia, Washing- 
ton and different points in Canada, while the 
rest comes direct to New York. Yesterday we 
received our first consignment of grapes. They 
are of the Sweetwater variety and arrived in 
fair condition. They sell from $2 to $4 for 20- 
pound cases. Karly Crawford peaches are find- 
ing quick sales at $2 to $4 per case. Nectar- 
ines bring the same price. Plums sell from 
$1.50 to $3 a case. Bartlett pears have the 
market all to themselves, being the only ones 
here. Their size, quality and condition are all 
that could be desired, and from $3 to $5 per 
case is easily obtained. Apricots are coming to 
the front with fair prospects of running the 
North Carolina fruit out. This is chiefly on ac- 
count of its fine appearance, for, like other 
California fruits, it loses much of its fine flavor 
on the long journey. It has cost us as high as 
$1,200 for a carload of fruit shipped by passen- 
ger train to Chicago. We look for a larger 
business than ever next season." 

Mr. Wiley, who has charge of the California 
canned goods departments in Thurber's store, 
said: "We think California is canning most 
too many goods for the present market, which 
is greatly overstocked. There is a fair distrib- 
utive trade, though hardly up to last year's 
business. I can't understand why canuers 
charge 25 cents a pound for evaporated apri- 
cots, when the cost of the green stock is not 
over 3 or 5 cents a pound. If they would retail 
at from 18 to 20 cents they would find a larger 
market for their goods in the East. We have 
trouble with California canned plums also. 
They swell up on the trip. Dealers in canned 
salmon are holding back for the season which 
begins on the 12th of July, but I don't think 
you will see the advance talked of in the 
papers." 

The San Lorenzo Cherries. 
There was some talk at the last meeting of 
the Horticultural Society about a shipment of 
cherries from San Lorenzo not having given an 
account of itself. The Oakland Tribune has 
the following, which perhaps refers to the miss- 
ing fruit: Last Friday J. L. Shiman, of San 
Lorenzo, received from Porter Bros., of Chi- 
cago, returns of a shipment of cherries sent by 
him to that market several weeks ago. This 
shipment embraced 25 crates, weighing 800 
pounds. The gross proceeds were $9,71 1, and 
the expenses of shipment and sale consisted of 
$3,125 on account of freight, and 40 cents for 
cartaae, leaving the net sum of $6,546 to the 
credit of the shipper. Mr. Shiman is very 
well satisfied with the result of the ven- 
ture, which, according to these returns, has 
netted him eight cents per pound at a time 
when the same fruit was selling here at three 
cents per pound. Yesterday Mr. Shiman and 
other San Lorenzo fruit growers shipped a car- 
load of Prince of Wales and Lady Washington 
plums and Moorpark apricots to Chicago. 



Peen-to Peaches. — We have never done 
much with the flat peach of China in this State, 
but they seem to have profitable use for it in 
Florida. A recent issue of the Florida Dis- 
patch says: We learn that Judge Means, of 
Micanopy, has been shipping Peen-to peaches 
at the rate of 10 to 15 bushels a dav of late. 
He ships mostly to southern points, and his re- 
turns have so far been satisfactory, most of 
them netting him $8.50 per bushel crate. He 
expects to ship 500 bushels this year. 



RAILWAYS in India. - The (iovernment of 
British India proposes to spend $110,000,000 
on railways during the next six years, $27,000,- 
000 of which will be expended during 1885 86, 
mostly for frontier lines for military purposes. 
Some 3,896 miles are deemed by the (iovern- 
ment as indispensable. The construction of 
1,200 miles per year in India, says the Ameri- 
can Engineer, will not appear unduly enterpris- 
ing to Americans, who have seen ten times that 
amount completed in the United States in one 
season by private capital. 

Fifteen hundred telephone instruments in 
Buffalo are supplied from electricity made by 
the water-power of Niagara Falls. 



The Chicken Business. 

It is desirable to discuss an industry from all 
points of view. For this reason we publish be- 
low extracts from a letter recently received by 
W. C. Damon, of Napa, which he sends us to 
use as we see fit: 

Your kind postal card has duly reached me, 
and your remarks have been noted with many 
thanks. I have since studied "Wright's Prac- 
tical Poultry Keeper." The book is rather old, 
and although a great deal of the information it 
contains is useful at the present day, still it 
seems somewhat behind the times as regards 
poultry raising on this coast. Unquestionably 
there are special difficulties here which do not 
trouble the poultry raiser East or in England, 
and it would, indeed, be interesting to know if 
ever any one here has been successful in keep- 
ing and raising poultry on a large scale, and if 
it can be done at all — understood, of course, 
that all possible attention is given to the busi- 
ness. 

It is frequently, almost uniformly, stated, 
that no kind of stock will pay so well in pro 
portion to the capital invested. That sounds 
very well, yet can any amount of capital be in- 
vested? Can a few hundred dollars be consid- 



Editors Press: -Thinking that your readers 
might like to know more of the Holstein cattle 
that arc attracting so much attention, I have 
gathered from reliable sources a few facts about 
this breed, and have embodied them into three 
or four articles for your paper. 

Bordering on the Chorth sea, from Denmark 
on the north to France on the south, is a strip 
of low marsh land, which, for centuries, has 
been used as a great pasture, where have 
grazed thousands of cattle. With a soil and 
a climate poorly suited to general farming, the 
people soon learned that upon their herds they 
must deyend for their support; consequently 
the raising of beef cattle and the manufacture 
of butter and of cheese have been followed 
for bo long a time that this branch of 
agriculture has been brought to a state of 
perfection unequalled by any other part of 
the world. When Caesar invaded this coast 
it was a waste of sandhills and of marshes, 
yet he found here fine herds of cattle, 
and he speaks of the people as a quiet and in- 
dustrious class, giving their entire attention to 
cattle raising and dairying, and he says, per- 
haps contemptuously, that they preferred farm- 
ing to war. With the Roman conquest came 
improved methods of cattle breeding, and also 



60 



fACIFie F^URALo press. 



[Jdly 25, 1885 



. . I cm be supplied. An industrial department for pointed as such committee Hush MeComas, I. 

T^ATRDN^ OF l> USB AN DRY. the training of those not skilled in any work I A. Wibox, W. E. Ward, W. C. Kingibury 
X- A 1 " UINI > ur f Lt uoraMI,L ' n wa8 als0 organized, with good resalts. That and J. R. Holland. 

this is greatly needed is too often proved by the ! 



Correspondence on Urantfe principles and work and re- 
ports of transactions of subordinate Granges arc respect 
fully solicited for this department- 



manifest inefficiency of applicant for assistance 
in obtaining employment. Of the 72 members 
who have spent a longer or shorter time at the 



Temescal Grange Report on San Fran- Union, work has been supplied to 40, and also 

to .">1 outside beneficiaries. Of these nearly all 



have given satisfaction, though some have 
shown the need of additional training. The 
Union's proportion of the "Robinson fund" has 
been applied to the relief of 10 outside bene- 



Cisco Girls" Union. 

Worthy Master, Brothers asm Sisters ok 

Tkmk.si ai.Granoe:— Your committee appointed 
to visit the "Girls' Union," of 714 Rush street, 
Nan Francisco, to gain further information re- 
garding its workings, objects and benefits, offer Jj'j™^ 1 monthly subscriptions from numerous 
the following report: The favorable impression f r i enr ia of the institution, who have also as 



rr ~ _ , - - , . . , Implies itnu UUCI1II1L I cuuiittnuil mivj »r u vi I 

ficianes. Since September 0th the society s W UcOXOn evoking mHob OMrriraeDt One 



receipts have amounted to SJ,S84 08: disburse 
nients, $3,690.02. The rent has been paid by 



The Committee at Work. 
After due time, the committee appointed to 
wait on Mr. Wilcoxon, Chairman of the State 
Roard of Equalization, found him at the asses- 
sor's office. The Herald says the members ex- 
hausted all their eloquence on him, but in the 
best natured way he promptly met every ob- 
; jection and adhered to his original intention. 
The interview was a remarkable one, the quick 
replies and unerring recollection shown by Mr. 

of 



gained from the first, of the great need and bene- 
fit of such an institution, was vastly increased 
by a closer inspection through our personal 
visit to its most homelike comforts and sur- 
rounding'. Truly, it is doing a good and most 
noble work for the unprotected, self sup- 
porting girls of our State, in helping them to 
help themselves. Rioms and board are fur- 
nished from $15 to $18 per month, with use of 
attractive parlors, music and reading. As its 
circular states, "Especially suited is this house 
to meet the wants of girls employed in public 
business places without parental homes and the 
sympathy and protection impossible to lodging | 
and restaurant life.'.' All beneficial members \ 
are entitled to such business aid as the society 
can give. Indies from the country visiting 
San Francisco or wishing to send their daugh- 
ters to study or learn trades can there be ac- 
commodated in a quiet, pleasant home. As the 
house holds a limited number and is often 
full, those applying at such times can ob 
tain board at the "Union" and lodging 
procured for them near by in desirable places 
recommended by the president. When the in- 
stitution has the necessary funds to purchase 
the property now occupied, it will own suf- 
ficient land in the rear of the present build- 
ings to put up a new building, the upper story 
supplying additional lodging rooms at nominal 
prices for those who are unable to pay the pres 
ent rates. The lower story will he devoted to 
the industrial department for the training of 
those not skilled in any work. They have al- 
ready a dressmaker's department in the present 
buildings, conducted by a first-class dressmaker, 
which supplies several girls with work, and is 
well patrouized by friends of the "Union." 
People from the country coming to the city can 
be accommodated in this line reasonably. Also, 
those desiring ladies' or children's home-made 
under-garmeuts, can, by leaving or sending 
their orders, obtain them as cheaply as else- 
where, and all the proceeds, except the actual 
cost of material, will be given to the girl who 
does the work. 

Usually one-half or two-thirds goes into the 
employer's pocket, thus compelling the poor 
girls to live, or rather die, on starvation prices. 
The great desire of the managers of the 
"Union" is to make it self sustaining, so that a 
much larger number can ba reached and bene- 
fited. Families in the country desiring a gov- 
erness, seamstress, nurse girl, cook or girl for 
general house-work, by sending a description of 
what is needed to the president, will meet with 
prompt attention, obtain reliab'e help, and 
thereby aid the noble enterprise on 



sisted in many other ways. The report closes 
by instancing a number of individual cases of 
needed relief afforded by the Union. 

All of which is duly submitted for your con- 
sideration.— [Mks. A. T. Dewey, Mrs. E. E. 
k m.m: y, NELLIE O. Raiicock, Committee. 



We gladly insert the above, believing it will 
be well for each Grange to have the same read 
I and acted on under "Hood of the Order," and 
as far as practicable give the "Girls" and the 
"Union" a fair chance to prove their useful- 
ness to the Grange and its members, as oppor- 
tunities occur. It would appear that little 
could be lost by the trial in any event, while 
much good might be derived from mutual asso- 
ciation. The officers of the "Union" are as 
follows: 

Officers for 1885 6: President— Miss G. W. 
Prink; Vice-Presidents— (1st) Mis. Charles 
Rlake, (2d) Mrs. Charles Eaton; Resident Di- 
rector-Mrs. O. K. Kinney; Secretary -Mrs. 
R. S. Miller: Treasurer — Win. Bos worth; 
Auditor Mrs. II. P. Wakelee. Board of Di 
rectors — Wm. Rosworth, l>r. L. A. Millard, 
Mrs. Charles Rlake, Mrs. Grace Bray, -Mrs. 
Charles Eiton, Miss M. R Cjchrane, Mrs. (!. 
W. Frink, Mrs. C. E. Kinney, Mrs. I. Shirp- 
ser, Mrs. W. .1. Stringer, Mrs. M. P. Wakelee. 
Advisory Boird — K Igar W. Steele, Dr. C. D. 
Harrows, L. R. Renchley, Dr. II. M. Fiske, 
Mrs. H. M. Fiske. Miss M. Very, Mis. L. P. 
Drexler, Miss E. Domett, Mrs. John F. Merrill, 
Mrs. Clara Foltz, Mrs. M. A. Doolittle, Mrs. 
H.C. Cirleton, Mrs. S. H. Dewey, Mrs. I. R. 
Chatterton, Mrs. N. O. Bibcock, Mrs. E. E. 
Kelsey, Mrs. E. W. Steele, Mrs. Charles Lux, 
Mrs. Sarah R. Cooper, Mrs. E. Reach, Mrs. H. 
G. Stedinan, Mrs. R. R. Sinchez, Mrs. XV. C. 
Woodman, Mrs. R. S. Miller, Mrs. W. Shaw, 
Mrs. S. P. Taylor, Mr*. Wm. Stiger, Mrs. D. 
C. Wickham, Mrs. O. H. Ames, Mrs. R. R. 
(ioddard, Mrs. A. O. S inborn, Mrs. W. 
Harrington. 

Ry addressing Mrs. C. E. Kinney, 714 Rush 
street, S. P., circulars and further information 
can be had. We freely give this subject a large 



the committee remarked: "That man could 
easily stand off the whole Grauge." 

The Sacramento Grangers and Fruit- 
Growers. 

There will be on Saturday of this week, July 
'2.5th, another meeting of Grangers and fruit 
growers in Grangers' hall, Sacramento. At that 
meeting the report of the committee on perma- 
nent organization will be received. The follow- 
ing is the committee appointed for that purpose 
at the last meeting: G. W. Hancock, P. H. 
Murphy, T. D. Lufkins, D. Lubin, E. Greer, 
I). Rums, .1. Routier, P. R. Green, J. H. Rut- 
ter, Dr. W. A. Hughson and J. R. Welty. 

Our report of the meeting of July 1 I th was 
not as full as we desired and for that reason we 
take from the Record Union the following out 
line of the sentiments and purposes expressed: 
It was distinctly avowed that the purpose of 
the organization was not in any manner to 
wage war upon commission dealers or others, 
but to contend with present conditions, and by 
an active effort seek o enlarge the market for 
our fruits by extending the area over which 
they are now sold at ihe Kist. Thus it was 
held that while the members of the association 
would be enabled to dispose of their orchard 
and vineyard products at more remunerative 
prices, the home market would also be relieved 
to the extent of these additional shipments 
abroad and prices and the demand for the fruits 
of small growers would be proportionately in 
creased for local consumption aud to supply the 
commission houses. 

It was also proposed that the scope and pur 
pose of the association should extend beyond 
that of merely disposing of fruit. It was sug- 
gested and warmly approved by all present that 
monthly meetings be held by the association, 
at which all fruit-growers should be invited to 
participate in a free exchange of views, confer- 
ence and debate upon all questions of interest 
connected with orchard and vineyard, such as 
the best methods of planting, cultivation, prun- 
ing, budding and grafting; the most profitable 
varieties for various uses, aud the many other 



Temescal Grange. 

An interesting meeting was held on Sitnrday 
last, w hich was well attended. A committee 
of five was appointed to aid and assist in pre- 
paring for the State Grange meeting to be held 
in Oakland in October, consisting of A. T. 
Dewey, L. Frink, X. G. Ribcock, Mrs. Kmily 
Ragge and Clara Deming-Maclise. This com- 
mittee has requested that sub-committees on 
decoration and music be appointed at the next 
meeting by the Master. The regalia committee 
was authorized to procure badges to supersede 
the old sashes. A fine hall with other accom- 
modations, it is thought, can be obtained, which 
for the comfort of those attending will prove 
unsurpassed by those of any former year. 

Oakland and its vicinity enjoys rare attrac- 
tions in addi ion to it'j cool and comfortable 
climate, among which we may mention the 
State University, the Oakland Cotton Mills, the 
Judson Nail and Iron Works, and the Oakland 
Jute Mills; all of which can be visited by the 
members individually, and some by the (irange 
in a body, most likely. 

It is desirable that neighboring Granges 
;nite with Temescal in arranging to make the 
annual meeting of the State Grange as agree- 
able and profi able as possible to all. 

Resolutions of Respect. 

I'.ditoks Press:- At a regular meeting of Grand 
Island Orange, Ihe following resolutions wen 
adopted in memory of Sister Mary Stin'.hfield, de- 
ceased: 

Wiikrkas. li has pleased the Supreme Master 
above to remove from our midsl the sislcr a ho has 
walked so meekly in His footsteps, here therefore be 
it 

Resolved, That ihe members of Grand Gland 
Grange offer their sinter- sympathies to the faniiiy 
in their sad bereavement. 

Resolved, As an expression of sorrow, our hall be 
draped in mourning for sixty days. 

Resolved, That these resolutions be preserved in 
I the records of ihe Grange: also a copy 1** sent to 
< Ihe California Patron, Rural Press and Colmia 
\ Sun, for publication. M. Strollier, Mrs. J. K. 
lolman, W. Wright, Committee. 



Santa Rosa Fair. — We have received a 
complimentary ticket to the fair of the Seventh 
Annual Exhibition of the Sonoma County Agri- 
cultural I 'ark Association, to be held at Santa 
Rosa ou August 17, 18, 19, '20, '21 and '22, in- 
clusive. The speed programme has very 
attractive features. The association has a 
good record for enterprise and for successful 
exhibitions. The President is I. De Turk, and 
the Secretary E. W. Davis, both of Santa Rosa. 



of farm produce that cm be used for the tables ciara county above that made by the assessor, 
will save the funds toward the purchasing of ™. , , . . , ,, 

...__»„ I The Ilr raid reports the meeting as follows: 



the property. Fruit otherwise going to waste 
will be gladly accepted, the "Union" paying 
the freight and expense of picking at much less 
cost than obtaining it from commission mer- 
chants of the city. Auxiliary ''Unions" should 
be established in every town of considerable 
Bize throughout the State a9 co-working 
branches of the San Francisco "Girls' Union." 

This is already being done in a few places. 

Direct communication could be then hid 
through all. Any person receiving a written 



space in our columns, believing the association subjects upon which such comparison ot views 
is worthy of encouragement for i a humanitarian ! an ,i discussion would be of great value. This 
efforts and elevating influences.— Eds. Press. I feature will not only be of interest to beginners, 

but those long in the business find they are stilt 
learning, and were most hearty in approval of 
this part of the programme for the association. 

Another subject closely allied to this, and of 
vast importance, was also suggested as one to 
be of great interest for consideration at the.-e 
meetings. It is that of insect pests which prey 
upon fruit trees and vines, aud which, unless 
controlled, will BDOn dispose of all surplus fruit 
and relieve the necessity for seeking an cxten 
slon of the fruit market. This subject was not 
only adopted as one to be included in the asso- 
ciation's discussions, but led, as soon as pro- 
posed, to an interesting debate. 



San Jose Grange and Assessments. 

Sin Jose G range held an open meeting Situr- 
day morning, July 18th, the first subject of dis- 
cussion being the proposition by the State Hoard 
Donations j of Kqua'ization to raise the assessment of Sinta 



In a few forcible remarks, Rush McCamas 
pointed out various reasons why the raise 
should not be made. Among other things he 
said that the proposition has come so suddenly 
that the Board of Supervises has had no op- 
portunity of appointing a committee, as it did 
last year, to visit adj icent counties and ascer- 
tain how the assessments compared. Mr. Mc 
Comas said that the assessment of this county 



Action by Sonoma Pomona Grange. 



endorsement from the secretary of one branch counties, and that the proposed raise would, if 



Editors Press: — Ry vote of Sonoma County 
Pomona Grange, I am directed to furnish you 
is high as compared with that of adjoining | the enclosed resolutions for publication. — G. 



would on presenting it receive recogni 
tion and aid from auy other. Thus it can be 
readily seen that if Granges throughout the 
country co-operate with the "Girls' Union,' 
mutual information and benefit can 1)9 gained. 
Aud we recommend that wherever womin's 
work is needed the Grangers correspond di 
rectly or through their secretiry with Mrs. C. E. 
Kinuey, resident director of the "Girls' Uaion," 
714 Rush street, Sin Francisco, thus securing a 



effected, be extremely un just. 

I. A. Wilcox claimed tuat the plan of assess- 
ing this county is unfair, as the assessor de- 
pends a great deal on the values of land as pub 
lished in the papers. This is an uncertain and 
unreliable plan. The speaker poiuted out some 
instances of fictitious prices and a consequent 
unjust assessment. The majority of property 
is already higher than its value. We have 
many disadvantages, among which is a climate 



better class of permanent ai d reliable help than that breeds every manner of pests. This en- 
can o herwise be obtained. The "Uaion" is tails great expense, and he Roard of Kqualiza- 
still in its infancy, but it has begun and is cir- j tion is not in sympathy with the people on this 
rying forward a most noble and harmonious subject. We are now trying to force a marke 
work through its ellieient, self-sacrificing dtrec in the Kist for our fruit under many disad- 
tor and able board of assistants. We most I vantages, and the effort ia still further ham- 
heartily wish it tod speed, and will do all in pered by high taxation. Mr. Wilcox desired 



N. Whitakkr, Secretary. 

Resolved, That the thanks of Pomona Grange, ot 
Sonoma county, are hereby tendered to liro. Wm. 
Johnston, Worthy Overseer of the California State 
Grange, for his very able and instructive address de- 
livered under the auspices of the Grange, ill ihe an- 
nual picnic held at Agricultural Park. May 27. 1885. 

Resolved, That these resolutions be spread upon 
the minutes of Pomona G:ange anil that the fecre 
tary be directed to furnish a copy of the same to 
P.ro. Wm. Johnston, to the KuRAI. Press. Califor- 
nia Patron and Santa Kosa daily pap»rs. 

Resolved, That the lhanks of this Grange are 
I hereby tendered to the officers of the Park Assoei- 
j aiion for the free use of their buildings and g-ounds. 
I Resolved, That '.he lhanks of this Grange are 
j hereby tendered to Santa Rosa Lodge, 1. O. ( i. T.. 
I for the free use of their organ for the 27th of May. 
Resolved. That the thanks of this (irange are 



our power to aid it. From the first annual 
port of Mrs. Kinney we give the following : 

A Year'a Work of the San Francisco Girls' 
Union. 

Mrs. C. K. Kinney, resident director of the Sin 
Francisco Girls' Union, in her first annual 



opinion of the people ou this subject, with a 
view to ascertain if the rule of the Constitution 
to assess property at its actual cost is a proper 

one. 

Mr. McComas pointed out variances that may 
arise in determining the cash value of property 
port of the progress of the institution, states | from sales. For instance, property may bring 
that it was early discovered that the question j a higher price after beiug thoroughly advertised 
of finding something to do for those applying to . than it would without. 



the appointment of a committee to exprens tbe ] hereby tendered to Ihe committee of arrangements 



on Grange picnic lor 
of the same. 



their successful management 



the Union was quite as imperative as furnishing 
them with a home. Consequently a special 
department was organized, which has now 104 
beneficiary and !)4 sustaining members, and is 
doing good work. The receipts of the depart- 
ment, through supplying domestic help to those 
needing it, hive thus far amouuted to §123, 
and it is further stated that there are four times 
as many applications for efficient servants as 



Mr. Wilcox further declared that property 
under mortgage is slower of sale than property 
not so hampered. 

. Ex Supervisor W. E. Ward mov ed that a 
committee of live be appointed to wait on the 
Chairmau ot the State Roard, who is now in 
town, and inform him of the true condition of 
facts. 

The motion was canied, aud the chairman ap- 



The San Jose Fri it Fair. — San Jose 
(irange, at its meeting on Saturday of last week, 
discussed the subject of an exhibit by the 
(irange. A committee on decorations was ap- 
pointed, consisting of Messrs. S Hinders, Powell 
and Keesling and Mesdames Saunders, Ingalls, 
Hale aud Albee. Mrs. Saunders was made 
chairman aud the committee was empowered to 
appoint additional members. A table and 
room and ways and means committee was ap- 
pointed, consisting of Messrs. Ward and Jones. 

VALLEY QbANOB. — This (irange, at Pachcco, 
Contra Costa county, is progressing. Six were 
admitted at the last meeting. 



Loin Granoe. — Lodi Grauge is reported 
doing well and holding regular meetings during 
the harvest season this year. The grain crop is 
various -from ."> to S bushels per acre on winter 
•owing* and 12 to "20 bushels on summer fallow. 
Watermelons are a short crop this year. 

J0Cg ^CULTURAL J^OTES. 

CALIFORNIA. 

Contra Costa 

GOOD Yield. — Autioch Led'ji r : E. W. 
Stediug, a prosperous and intelligent farmer of 
Brentwood, came down to Autioch to celebrate 
the Fourth. We are glad to learn that his crop 
this year has turned out much better than he 
expecttd. On 110 acres he raised l,7'2l bags 
of wheat, and he says it is the plumpest club he 
ever saw. (irigsby .V Norman threshed it, and 
averaged 911 backs per Jay, which shows that it 
yielded pretty well and that they have a ma- 
chine that shells it out very rapidly. Careful, 
intelligent farming, for which the farmers of 
Ryron and Rrentwood are noted, has accom 
plished this full yield in a dry year. Another 
evidence of good farnvng comes from Amos. A. 
Grave*, who has a farm near Antioch. He had 
JO acres which yielded 47ti bags of wheat — 
nearly '2 200 pounds to the acre. Farmers will 
learn by au I by that it pays tj do more than 
scratch the ground. 

Los Angeles 
Co OPERATIVE Raisin Packino. — At the last 
meeting of the raisiu makers at the water office 
in Orange, a committee was appointed to ex- 
plain through the columns of the Orange Tri 
bane and Sinta Ana papers the objects aud 
purposes of a raisiu packing company, which a 
number of raisiu makers are endeavoring to or- 
ganize in this valley. Much complaint h.i« 
been made by E istern buyers of California 
raisins of the lack of uniformity in grailiug and 
packing, and consequently our raisins have 
brought lower prices than foreign raisins of the 
same grade. It cannot be expected that there 
will be uniformity in the packing when each 
grower grades and packs his own raisins. There 
will probably be as many different styles of 
grading aud packing as there are packers. 
Again, it would be impossible for each packer 
to make a reputation and name in the market 
for his particular brand. An owuer of ten to 
twenty acre* of Muscat vines would scarcely he 
able to supply the wholesale dealers of the 
country with half pound samples. By organ- 
ized effort we can secure ( 1 ) uniformity of pack 
ing, (2) the reducing of commissions, (3) lower 
rates for boxes and other packing material, (4) 
I more effective co-operation with the raisin pro- 
' ducers of other districts for such ends aa our- 



July 25, 1885] 



pACIFie I^URAlo PRESS. 



61 



common interests might prompt, (5) the advan- 
tage of shipping in carload lots. The charges 
to each shareholder for grading and packing 
will be made as near cost as possible. The 
boxes will be marked with the name of the 
company and the grade of the raisins, and to 
distinguish one man's goods from another, each 
stockholder shall have a small number which 
shall be stamped in small figures on his boxes. 
After the raisins are packed and the packing 
paid for, each stockholder will have the privi- 
lege of disposing of his raisins as he pleases. 
When Eastern dealers learn that raisins put up 
by our company in large, quantities, and hon- 
estly graded and packed can be had in carload 
lots, they will buy them at our warehouse for 
cost. The sampling of one or two boxes will 
be sufficient. It will not be necessary to ex- 
amine one box in 10 or 20 as would be the case 
when packed by individual growers. It is the 
intention of the starters of this company to 
take in as many of the raisin makers of the val- 
ley as possible in order to establish a name and 
reputation for the company in one or two sea- 
sons. If only a small part of the growers be- 
come members, a longer time will necessarily 
be required. Each stockholder must subscribe 
for one share of stock for each acre of bearing 
vineyard owned by him. Assessments will be 
levied upon the stock only as required to meet 
the expenses of the company. The capital 
stock is placed at 150,000; 10,000 shares at $5 
each. Without an organization of some kind, 
the business will remain as it is now. Eastern 
dealers will never come here to buy mixed lots 
in sweat boxes; consequently there will be noth- 
ing left for us to do but to sell to local buyers 
for the prices they choose to offer. It has beeD 
proven time and again that individuals cannot 
pack, grade and market their own raisins with- 
out being obliged to accept much lower prices 
than are paid tor those packed by large con- 
cerns and shipped in large quantities.— The 
Committee. 

Merced. 

On the Buhach Plantation.— Valley A rgus, 
July IS: Having heard reports of great de- 
struction being done by grasshoppers on the 
Buhach plantation and neighboring farms to the 
northwestward of Merced, we paid a visit to 
that splendidly managed aiid productive estate 
on Wednesday last, accompanied by our asso- 
ciate, and were politely received by Mr. <i. E, 
Ladd, the superintendent, who, after a refresh- 
ing luncheon had been served, presided over by 
Mr. Ladd, and at which we were joined by 
Prof. Coquillette, who is attached to the De- 
partment of Agriculture, and sent specially to 
this county to investigate the grasshopper 
plague and report to the Department, conducted 
us over the premises. Mr. Ladd has commenced 
a work of extermination against the grasshop- 
pers by use of poison, having obtained 1,200 
pounds or arsenic for use on the plantation. The 
hoppers have given the buhach plant the go-by, 
but have played havoc with the nurseries, or- 
chards, vineyards and flowering plants and 
shrubs, and he now is endeavoring to put a 
stop to their ravages. He commenced work 
putting out the poison on Sunday afternoon, 
employing 14 men, and got over the place in 
three days, using 400 pounds of arsenic and a 
like amount of sugar mixed with a ton of brun, 
and judging by the heaps of dead and dying 
grasshoppers we saw lying upon the ground 
under the vines and trees and along the 
ditches, the experiment, considering the short 
space of time in which the poison had been 
used, is proving eminently successful. The 
poison is mixed : One pound of arsenic to one 
pound of sugar and five pounds of bran mixed 
dry and stirred up with sufficient water to 
made a thick mush. Superintendent Ladd in- 
formed us that the crop of buhach flowers this 
season was lighter than last, owing to the dif- 
ference in the seasons, though enough had been 
harvested to make the crop pay a handsome 
profit. 

Napa. 

A New Cellar. — St. Helena Star : Ewer 
and Atkinson's wine cellar, at Rutherford, is ap- 
proaching completion, and besides presenting a 
fine architectural appearance externally, the 
interior embraces all the latest improvements 
and facilities for the storage and making of 
wine. The main building covers a space of 
125x00, is constructed of stone and iron and is 
two stories in hight. The rear addition is 24x40 
and four stories high. An aerating room for 
white grapes is on the third floor, immediately 
below the crushers and below the presses, thus 
allowing the pomace to fall by gravitation from 
the crushers to the presses instead of handling 
as has been the practice heretofore. I led grapes 
will be conveyed to the fermenting tanks and 
the pomace by cars to the presses, which are 
located lower than the fermenting room, thus 
allowing the grapes to be dumped from the cars 
to the presses. The poinace after pressing will 
be dropped into a suitable receptacle and pre- 
pared for distillery purposes. The capacity for 
storage is about 150,000, subject to enlarge- 
ment. The building will be used for the stor- 
age and making of wine made from the vine- 
yards of the proprietors and will handle this 
season's vintage. The buildings will be fire- 
proof and will cost about $8,000. 

Napa. 

A Jersey Dairy. — Cor. Napa Register: Op- 
posite the Grigsby vineyard, on the west side 
of the road that leads to the quiet town of 
Yountville, lies the farm of A. McFarland, con- 
sisting of some 400 acres, the western boundary 
being for some distance the river. As on sev- 
eral farms in this neighborhood, so here the 



chief pursuit is dairying. The proprietor takes 
just pride in his herd of Jerseys -full blooded 
and graded — 60 of which are now being milked. 
The lover of good kine will be well repaid for 
any exertion he may make to examine this herd, 
and to investigate the methods of dairying here 
pursued. Such a number of genuine butter 
cows is seldom met with in this valley and they 
represent years of persistent effort, on the part 
of Mr. McFarland, to bring his dairy to the 
forefront. Forty or fifty Jersey calves, look- 
ing, as they feed in the meadow, like tame 
fawns, with slim, well-proportioned forms and 
large liquid eyes, indicate that the superiority 
of the herd will be maintained. The Stone 
dairy, situated half a mile west of the residence 
of the proprietor, is worthy a visit. The rock 
of which it is constructed was quarried with 
considerable labor in the hills to the east, a 
mile or more distant. Neatness characterizes 
the workings of the establishment. As the 
cows are milked in the adjoining yard on the 
hillside, the milk is poured into a receptacle 
and is conducted into a large tin holder on the 
second floor of the dairy, no milkman entering 
the building until the cows are all milked. 

Santa Barbara. 

Cork Oak. — Independent, July 18: On the 
property of Mr. Winchester, who resides on 
Montecito street, grows a cork tree, verging on 
its 25th year, measuring some 20 inches in di- 
ameter, and its bark is two inches in thickness. 
In conversation with Miss Winchester last even- 
ing we were informed that this tree is supposed 
to be the only one of its kind in Southern Cali- 
fornia, and owing to this fact it receives consid- 
erable attention from visitors who visit Santa 
Barbara. [This is quite a mistake. The Rural 
Press of December 13, 1884, had an engraving 
of a cork oak now growing on S. Richardson's 
place in San Gabriel, Los Angeles county. 
There are two trees on the place from 45 to 55 
feet high and 215 to 27 inches in diameter of 
trunk. The trees are about the same age as the 
one at Santa Barbara. All were probably 
started from acorns sent out from the Patent 
Office. — Eds. Press. | 

Santa Clara. 

Winery and Cannery. — San' a Clara Jour- 
nal, July 15: Mr. J. P. Pierce is now prepared 
to care for his own fruit, if he cannot sell it at 
a price which will be remunerative. To this 
end he has erected a winery, 50x138 feet on the 
ground floor, a portion of which is two stories 
high. The lower portion is divided into two 
rooms, the one 22x100 feet is the storage room, 
the walls of which are filled with tan bark and 
are eight inches thick. The other room occu- 
pies all the balance of the ground floor, and 
will contain the fermenting tanks. The upper 
floor will contain the crusher, etc., which will 
be run by steam: the power will be de- 
rived from an engine in an adjoining building 
used for pumping purposes. The cannery 
stands just west of the winery, and contains a 
work room and a storage room. The work room 
is fitted up with tables, tanks for syrup, water 
faucets, etc., etc., and has the capacity of put- 
ting up two tons of fruit per day. The fruit is 
put up in glass jars so the purchaser can see 
just the kind of fruit he is buying. Work was 
commenced in this cannery last Thursday on 
apricots. They will soon be at work on 
peaches, when it is expected to test the full 
capacity of the institution. 

Sierra. 

Sierra Valley. — Cor. Reno Gazette, July 
13: The prospects for a new grain crop were 
never better than now in this valley. The hay 
crop will not be much over half an average 
crop, but of better quality than usual. Beef 
cattle are doing extremely well, and there are a 
good many very fat cattle here now. Haying 
is only nicely begun, and the grain is about all 
headed out, as the season is late and has been 
frosty all summer, excepting the past week, 
which has been hot, the thermometer standing 
as high as 67 degrees on the north and 107 de- 
drees on the south side of the buildings. There 
are seven or eight men here for every job of 
work, and more men looking for work than 
ever before in this valley, and a few of them 
are the genuine tramp. It looks alarming to 
see so many men seeking employment, but this 
valley is very favorably located to be freed 
from tramps as soon as cold weather sets in, as 
they only come up here for their health in July 
and August. Wages are only $1.50 per day 
this harvest. 

Sutter. 

Field Fires.— Yuba City Farmer: In our 
issue of last week we gave an account of the 
burning of two large barley stacks in the field 
of and belonging to B. F. Walton; and now it 
becomes our duty to chronicle another mysteri- 
ous fire which resulted in the burning of two 
wheat stacks last Monday morning about nine 
o'clock, in the field of his brother, (ieorge Wal- 
ton, situated about a half mile from the resi- 
dence of Mr. B. F. Walton. Mr. Walton esti- 
mates the stacks to have contained about 300 
sacks, upon which there was no insurance. The 
s acks were situated in the extreme south end 
of the field and about three quarters of a mile 
from the county road. The origin of the fire is 
a mystery, but the general sentiment attributes 
it to an incendiary, though no one was seen in 
or about the stacks. 

Supervisor Lifous Striplin, of Nicolaus, was 
on last Monday night (from all appearances) a 
victim of a "fire bug." Mr. Stripliu's thresh- 
ing outfit, which had just finished up a "set- 
ting" on a ranch near Nicolaus, just at quitting 
time; the crew had made everything in readi- 
ness to move early the following morning, and 



about 11 o'clock at night a fire broke out in the 
straw immediately under the separator, and in 
a few seconds the machine was entirely envel- 
oped in flames. Members of the crew who 
were sleeping near by were soon on hand and 
with difficulty succeeded in removing the seed- 
cleaner and other articles to safe quarters. We 
are informed that Mr. S. is of the opinion, 
judging from the fumes arising and the manner 
in which the straw burned, that coal oil had 
been applied. 

Stanislaus. 
Irrigation Enterprise.— Modesto, July 18: 
A large and enthusiastic meeting was held this 
afternoon at Rogers' hall, the object being the 
organization of an irrigating canal stock com- 
pany. Many of the largest land owners were 
present. Mr. Bost, a civil engineer, read a re 
port of his preliminary survey. The same was 
indorsed by those interested in irrigation. The 
report says the ditch or canal will begin one 
mile west of Lagrange, on the south side of the 
Tuolumne river. The survey was made for 15 
miles, where it strikes the plains. The esti- 
mated cost of said 15 miles will be $184,000. 
The canal will be 40 feet wide and carry 5 feet 
of water. After the canal reaches the plains 
the cost will be nominal. It is expected the 
main canal will be 35 to 40 miles in length. 
A subscription list was opened and a great deal 
of the stock was subscribed for. By present in- 
dications the undertaking will be a success. 
Once the water is brought on these plains Stan- 
islaus county will be equal to any other part of 
the State. 

Tulare. 

Another Good Report. — Tulare Register: 
A fortnight or so ago we made mention of a 
good yield of wheat grown by J. W. Elder upon 
his ranch west of Laurel Farm. Since then 
Mr. Elder has harvested 80 acres of barley and 
20 acres of wheat where he resides, just east of 
the Artesian Fruit Belt Colony. From this 
tract, 100 acres in all, he got 1,611 sacks of 
grain, which is a very good yield for this year. 
But the point we wish to make is this : This 
land was thoroughly irrigated one year ago 
last June, and well plowed as soon thereafter as 
possible. Last year the grain was sown and 
harrowed in. Enough moisture remained in the 
ground from that irrigation to carry the crop 
through the rainless spell/>f three months' dura- 
tion we had last winter and spring, and mature 
a good crop with the aid of the late rains. It 
does piy to irrigate whenever water can be 
had. 

Shipping Fruit. — Visalia Times, July 16: 
I. H. Thomas is now shipping an average of 
35 boxes of fruit per day to points in Arizona 
and New Mexico. He sends it by express. 
His principal shipments are peaches, pears 
nectarines and plums. He disposes in this way 
of not more than one third of his fruit. The 
surplus is preserved by drying, and Mr. Thomas 
will immediately begin to dry peaches in his 
drier in the rear of the store. For some time 
back he has been drying fruit in his orchard by 
sun-drying. It is quite probable that he will 
soon begin shipping potatoes to points on the 
line of the Atlantic and Pacific, as he has se- 
cured a rate which is just three cents more per 
hundred than the charge from San Francisco. 



American missionaries and then go and preach 
the same, word for word, to his Hawaiian 
gregation. 

A model of a canoe was exhibited and pro 
of making described. Kamehameha I. and his 
warriors sailed about in canoes and brought all 
the different islands — which had each been a 
separate kingdom — under his rule. Anolher 
Napoleon! His photograph was shown, with 
the king wearing the royal coat, made entirely 
of feathers. To make it each Hawaiian subject 
was required to bring feathers as a tribute to 
His Majesty — yellow feathers found under the 
wing ot a black bird. The cloak is a beautiful 
thing and is highly esteemed by the Islanders. 

Two heathen idols were shown — one a photo- 
graph, the other of wood. Then a water color 
painting of a bread fruit, which was painted 
by Mrs. Armstrong, when for six months mis- 
sionary at the Marquesas. 

The Marquesans are a fierce and anthropopha- 
gous people. The Sandwich Islanders loving, 
good-hearted, loyal — and have never eaten 
human flesh to the knowledge of the mission- 
aries, though it is supposed they were cannibals 
in remote periods. Mr. and Mrs. Alexander 
left the Marquesas after a short stay to return 
to missionary work at the Sandwich Islands, 
because the English Board of Missions could 
with less expense than the American Board of 
Missions carry on thi work. Mrs. Armstrong 
told a number of amusing incidents of the Mar- 
quesans. 

All present were highly interested, Mrs. 
Armstrong's remarks being listened to with 
great attention. F. H. A. 

S. F., July 'IB, 1885. 



3 



NTOMOLOGIQAb. 



The Native Hawaiians. 

Editors Press:— At the monthly reception 
of the Girls' Union, held on the 10th inst., Mrs. 
C. C. Armstrong, wife of the late Dr. Arm- 
strong, spoke at length of the primitive 
Hawaiians. Mrs. Armstrong has but recently 
returned from the Sandwich Islands, having 
lived there 48 years engaged in missionary 
work. She began by speaking of the earliest 
days of Sandwich Island life, and explained how 
the people made their grass huts (exhibiting a 
miniature model) which was done without nails, 
the natives using cord made from the bark of 
trees. No chimney was needed, for the cooking 
was done out of-doors in a hole in the ground. 
The floor was covered with mats made from 
the leaves of Puhala or screw pine. Beds were 
made of similar mats piled sometimes five or 
six deep, one above the other — hus making a 
mattress. The food mos ly eaten was the taro 
root, which grows in the water like a lily. The 
root or bulb is baked in the ground with heat 
from red hot stones which gives a very deli- 
cate flavor to the edible. Mrs. Armstrong ex- 
pressed a great liking for the taro, saying she 
would prefer it any time to sponge cake. 
When it is thus baked the root is beaten with 
heavy stone pounders with cold water un il the 
whole forms a paste. It is then placed in cala- 
bashes or dishes made of gourds— these care- 
fully prepared for use by skilled hands. 

Mrs. Armstrong then told of her first call on 
Kahumanu, one of the wives of Kamehameha 
I., a proud, haughty, but very intelligent 
woman. She was found sitting in a common 
wooden rocking-chair, attired in a white cotton 
holoku, in a grass hut. 

She learned to read the Bible translated from 
the English into Hawaiian. She died a beauti- 
ful Christian death. Before her death, when a 
copy of the New Testament was given her, she 
laid it on her bosom and said "Makai" — i. e., 
good. 

A picture was shown of Bartimeus, the blind 
native preacher, so-called from the Bible char- 
acter. He was the court fool, going to church 
for fun; he, however, in time, became a Chris- 
tian and a preacher. He had a wonderful 
memory; would listen to the sermons by the 



Grasshoppers and the CocUin Moth. 

Editors Press : — Grasshoppers have done 
much damage in the vicinity of Mt. St. Helena, 
or the upper end of the Napa valley, and 
in part of Knight's valley. In my immedi- 
ate neighborhood they have damaged vines 
and many young fruit trees. They were 
in great numbers on Mr. Win. Short s place, 
which is in care of Mr. Henry Martin. He 
tried sulphur, sulphur smoke and one or two 
other methods to destroy or drive them off, but 
seeing the prescription published in the Rural 
Press, viz., arsenic, sugar, water and bran 
mixed; he tried it with gratifying results. 
He had tried it with shorts before seeing the 
bran recipe, but it soon hardened and the hop- 
pers did not eat much of it. 

I was with him July 16th and saw to my sat- 
isfaction that they rat the bran mixture readily 
and that it kills them by the wholesale. Some 
die on the spot and many crawl into cracks or un- 
der clods in the grass ad joining, or anywhere to 
hide and soon die. Mr. Martin is much pleased 
with his success in exterminating them. 

I saw myriads of them in Kansas, years ago, 
but never saw anything tried that beats them 
so effectually. Foi vines, when but little of 
the mixture is needed, 40 cents per acre will 
pay all the expense connected with it and do 
the work thoroughly. We think for large quan- 
tities it can be doi?e a little cheaper per acre, as 
the poison, sugar and bran can be bought for . 
lees. I believe, from what I have seen in this 
vicinity, that the scourge need not be greatly 
feared in the future: for if, as is usually the 
case, they are seen along the fence rows or 
strips of grass bordering the corn, trees and 
vines, and the poison is put down in small 
quantities at intervals, they will stop to eat it 
and never hunger more. They will leave green 
corn, vines and other toothsome diet for the 
poison, and soon "pass in their checks." 

Codlin Moth Crawling Downwards. 

I have noticed, in watching the codlin moth, 
that simply gathering up the fallen fruit wili 
not effectually stop the pest. The worm often 
leaves the fruit before it falls and crawls down 
the tree to find a place to hide and soon goes 
into the pupa state. The burlop wrapper, if 
left loose at the upper edge, will furnish a good 
hiding place, and by examining it often you 
will find the worms secreted there. 

I have picked all the apples that I noticed 
damaged, and even then failed to find worms in 
all of them -the worms having left. By gather- 
ing all you can see off' of the tree, by picking 
up those that drop off, and putting the band 
on the tree, and examining both above and be- 
low the string that you tie it on with, you may 
secure the pest. I also think if hogs could be 
put in the orchard they would destroy many, 
and tramp and root the ground so as to leave 
little chance for a harbor, except where tho 
trees are old and full of rough bark. In that 
case the bark should be scraped off thoroughly, 
and then tie on the wrapper. 

One of my neighbors — Mr. Thomas Walsh — 
has a few old trees which he treated in this 
manner, also cleaning away around the trunk 
at the surface of the ground, and then put on 
wrappers tied with bale rope, and in this man- 
ner catches many of them. Mr. Walsh and 
sons are old residents of this valley, and are 
well known by many people; and so far as my 
observation goes they are as thorough -going and 
successful as anyone in fact, they have one of 
the nicest and most thoroughly-kept farms and 
vineyards to be seen in this end ot the valley. 

CalistO'ja. J. C. Wkyhright. 



62 



fACIFie RURAL* fRESS. 



[Jolt 25, 1886 




Exhumo. 



Should you dream ever of the days departed — 

Of youth and morning, no more to return, 
Forget not nie, so fon.l and passionate-hearted; 
Quiet at last reposing 
Under the moss and fern. 

There where the fretful lake in stormy weather, 
Comes circling round the reddening churchyard 
pines 

Rest, and call back the hours we lost together, 
Talking of hope and soaung 
Beyond poor earth's confines. 

If, for those heavenly dreams too dimly sighted, 

Vou became false — why 'tis a story old: 
I, overcome by pain and unrequited, 

Faded at last and slumbered 
Under the autumn mould. 

Farewell, farewell ! No longer plighted lovers, 

Doomed for a day to sigh for sweet return: 
One lives, indeed; one heart the green earth covers— 
Quiet at last, reposing 
Under the moss and fern. 

Harry Cornwall. 

Cousin Rachel. 

IWritten for Ri rat, Prksb t>y Fasnik [sarri, Surrrhk. I 
Have you ever seen a woman who lias grown 
into middle age and still retained the heart of a 
child ? If you have, then you have seen 
"Cousin Kachel." All the freshness and purity 
and truth of her early youth are still hers, un- 
dimmed by the sorrows and trials and wearying 
troubles through which she has passed. Wife- 
hood and motherhood have not robbed her of 
that gentle, serene faith which seems so often 
to flee before the cares and heartaches of 
womanhood. 

But there are some hearts which can never 
grow old, and hers is one of them. Kven with 
her grandchildren at her knees and the few 
silver threads in her glossy brown hair she is 
still young. 

A few years ago I went to visit Cousin 
Kachel, who is my father's favorite cousin. 
She looked so fresh and cool as she stood on the 
steps waiting my arrival, and her welcome was 
a rare one, so simple and cordial. I felt that 
all I had heard of her did not in the least exag- 
gerate the good qualities I had attributed to 
her. 

"Really," she said, as she led the way to the 
cosy sitting-room, "you must excuse my house. 
We are a little upset just now, being on the 
eve of remodeling our home." 

I looked around to see some evidence of the 
confusion, but I could find none. To me the 
house looked very neat and comfortable. 

"Yes," continued Cousin Rachel, relieving 
me of my hat and parcels and pushing toward 
me an inviting easy-chair, "the house has never 
quite suited us since we bought it. It was 
originally owned by Southerners, who seemed 
to have strange ideas as to convenience and 
comfort when they built it. But of course the 
awkwardness of taking care of such a house 
mattered very little to them, for they had 
plenty colored people to bear the trouble and 
inconvenience." 

"But I know you are tired," she added, 
"and I am going to send you to your own room 
to get rested. We can discuss these matters 
later, after you have told me how Cousin 
Ceorge, your father, is, and all the home 
news." 

I assured her of my deep interest in her 
house plans, but with her characteristic 
thoughtfulness she insisted on my getting 
rested first before she laid any of her plans be- 
fore me. I could not resist the soothing in- 
fluence of that cool, little white curtained 
chamber, with the green branches of the tall 
elms leaning in at the windows and the soft 
summer breeze bringing in the sound of the 
bird songs and the hum of the bees. Before I 
knew it the drowsy rest overcame me and I 
was sound asleep. I could scarcely realize that 
nearly two hours had passed when Cousin 
Rachel laid her soft hand in mine to rouse me 
for lunch. 

"I am glad you slept," she said, interrupting 
my apologies for so long a slumber, "railroad 
journeys, however short, are always tiresome. 
The constant racket and motion are so apt to 
make one's head ache." 

Dear Cousin Rachel, she was always thinking 
of some one else, so seldom of herself. I think 
selfishness was a quality which had not the 
slightest part in her nature. I knew her 
household duties and cares must have been 
wearing, yet she never complained or seemed 
harassed by them. Her thought was always 
for the comfort and happiness of others. Few 
women ever sacrifice themselves more abso- 
lutely for home and family than she had done, 
and in the church and the Sunday school she 
was always Jthe patient worker and cheerful 
giver. All these things I found out afterward, 



but I could have guessed them as she stood be- 
side me with that sweet unselfish smile on her 

face. 

"I suppose Rachel will make your life miser- 
able while you are here with her plans about 
this house," laughed her husband when we 
were seated at lunch in the pleasant dining- 
room. "All well-conditioned women with act- 
ive brains must have a hobby. This is hers." 

"Yes, and the lobby," chimed in Cousin 
Kmma, her youngest daughter, a brilliant girl 
of thirteen. "I really think mamma's life 
would be aimless without that lobby. I guess 
she dreams about it at night." 

Cousin Rachel smiled in her serene fashion. 

"Well," I rejoined, "on the part of .nen hob- 
bies are generally the result of unevenly bal- 
anced minds, but as women are naturally such 
erratic creatures I do not see that a hobby more 
or less should make much difference in our esti 
mate of a woman's character. After all, it is 
the people with hobbies who accomplish the 
great things in this world." 

Cousin Rachel's face wore a pleased look be- 
hind the tea-urn. 

"That was a generous defense," she said. "I 
thank you in the name of our sex." 

"As it never pays for one man to argue the 
question with two women, I will have to re- 
treat in good season," said her husband, "but 
I must confess that there will be no doubt as to 
the greatness of the deed if Rachel succeeds in 
re-making this house satisfactorily. I have 
heard nothing but 'plans' since we entered it." 

"Well," I replied, "I do not see why women 
should not be successful builders as well as men. 
They should certainly know the requirements 
of a convenient and comfortable home. But 
tell me," I continued, curiously, "what is this 
lobby Y ' 

"Well," answered Cousin Richel, with an 
amused smile, "we call it the lobby for the 
want of a better name. What was its original 
design no one knows. It is neither hall, ante- 
chamber nor entrance. It ia cold and cheerless 
in winter and gloomy in summer. Practically 
it is of no use and is a serious inconvenience, 
placed as it is between the dining-room and 
kitchen." 

With that she opened a door and disclosed to 
me what they were pleased to term the "lobby." 
In lieu of a better use they had tilled it with 
odds and ends, boxes, a chest of drawers and 
numerous other things which will get into the 
way of the good house-wife. 

"You see," said Cousin Richel, "it never 
was intended for a room, for the walls are not 
finished for each apartment, and there was no 
need of a hall here." 

The house was a double one, built somewhat 
irregularly ; with more rooms on the first floor 
than on the second. 

"How strange," I said, "that they should 
leave that space between the kitchen and din- 
ing-room." 

"Well," answered Cousin Rachel, "don't you 
see that made no difference to these Southern- 
ers? Probably they had no cooking done in 
the house — that being done by the negroes in 
an outside establishment. We have merely ap 
propriated these roorru} to our own uses, without 
regard to their original purpose. Now, the 
question is, what shall we make of this place?" 

"A conservatory," I suggested, thinking of 
her devotion to flowers. She shook her head, 
smiling. 

"Would it not be a trifle ridiculous," she 
asked, "to have to pass through the conserva- 
tory with all the dinner dishes? Besides, I fear 
the heat and kitchen odors would kill the plants. 
Otherwise, the idea would be excellent." 

"Well, ina," said Kmma, who seldom failed 
to make her ideas, which were generally 
bright ones, known, "you know there is only 
one sensible way, and that is to make this 
room into a library, and the lobby into a din- 
ing-room." 

"Why, of course," I said, "that is, by all 
means, the plan." 

"Well, I suppose it will end that way," said 
Cousin Rachel, who, it did not take me long to 
discover, was rather given to conforming her 
ideas to her children's; "but really, I had 
thought, as long as this room is so small, of 
adding that space to it and making it all into a 
large, sunny, hospitable dining-room. I al- 
ways dislike to feel that my room is smaller 
than my company." 

That sounded just like Cousin Richel, always 
planning for the pleasure of others. 

After lunch we had a long quiet chat in the 
sitting-room, with now and then some charac- 
teristic remark from Kmma, who was curled up 
in a big rocking-chair, with a Wavcrly novel iu 
her lap. Her precocity was rather amazing. 
Longfellow and Whittier were familiar songs 
to her, and Shakespeare was not beyond her. 

I was much interested in some of the sketches 
and stories Cousin Rachel had written, for she 
was a bright literary woman, in spite of the 
fact that she had modestly buried her talents 
in obscurity. Indeed, she might have shown 
as a star in the literary firmament, had her de- 
votion to the home circle been less self absorb- 
ing. But, after all, I think the crown she wore 
was the brightest. 

Many pleasant talks did we have like that, 
for even into the midnight hours did we often 
sit in my pleasant little chamber with the lamp 
burning low, and the sweet scents of the flowers 
stealing in on the night winds. 

I loved always to talk with cousin Rachel. 
Her sweet, simple wisdom, gathered through 
years of pain and joy and slow heart-growing, 
gave me so much of solace and encouragement 
for the years that lay before me, and her child- 



like faith and purity emphasized the plain 
thoughts and teachings as nothing else could 
have.done. I think it was always the simplicity 
of her character which touched me most deeply. 

"I think I should publish a book if I had the 
money," she said, one evening, as she came into 
my room to say good-night. Somehow it was al 
ways those "good-nights" which led us into the 
long confidential chats. Her husband used to 
laugh at us sometimes, wondering what on earth 
we could find to talk about until almost midnight. 
But there is always something fascinating in 
ideas exchanged after other people are in dream- 
land, and it was always so pleasant in that lit- 
tle high chamber, overlooking the pretty town 
and the lights on the river below, with some- 
times the huge Mississippi packets passing by, 
laden to the water's edge and ablaze with lights. 

"I wish you could," I answered, with an in- 
ward desire that I had been born rich, and then 
that look of patient resignation had come on 
her calm face, which I knew it had worn many a 
time. It seems such a little thing to say, but 
who knows the sorrow of a gifted nature which 
has been forced to crush its highest aspirations? 
Few self denials are so bitter. To have the long- 
ing always and never the opportunity to give 
expression to the thousands of beautiful 
thoughts and images that flit through the mind. 

The next day she began her preparations for 
repairing and rearranging the house. She had 
wished to defer further improvements until my 
visit was ended, but I had entreated her to let 
me have a hand in it, for I had become deeply 
interested in her plans. 

For the next few days we were completely 
upset. But we did not mind it in the least; in- 
deed, as Kmma said, "We just reveled in the 
glorious confusion." And picturesque visions we 
were to be sure, masqueradiug in blue checked 
gingham and big aprons, more useful than co- 
quettish. Our dearest friends could not have 
accused us of vanity. 

Kmma had a fashion of accumulating dust on 
also her piquant nose, which was amusing, if 
not artistic. She had a fondness for poking 
around in odd corners and looking for "treas 
ures" which she was quite sure must be hidden 
somewhere, a mania which her mother at- 
tributed to too much book reading. 

One noontime, when the workmen were tak- 
ing their|mid-day meal, she burst in upon Cousin 
Richel and I, who were at work in the sitting 
room, like a flash of lightning. 

"I've found it !" she cried, her voice tremb- 
ling and her eyes flashing. 
"What?" we asked. 

"Why the treasure." She held out her hand. 
Something glittering lay within it. It was a 
gold coin. Her mother's face turned'white. 
"Where did you find it?" she asked. 
"Under the south wall of the lobby which 
they are beginniug to tear down." 

She went back to the lobby and we hurried 
after her, too excited to utter a word. In a 
moment all ihree were searching for further 
evidence of the treasure. We found it at last, 
a Bmall bag filled with gold. There was a small 
hole in one side of it through which the coin 
that Kmma had found had probably escaped. 
I'. si.ii- it was a small tin box filled with old- 
fashioned jewelry. 
"W'ell ! ' 
"Well I" 
"Well I" 

It was all we could say, we three, sitting 
there in the midst of the rubbish and plastering, 
looking like three Cinderellas among the ashes. 
A photographer should have been there to have 
immortalized us. 

"Whose is it, do you suppose?" asked Cousin 
Kachel when she had recovered her breath. 

"Why yours, of course," I replied. "Don't 
you own the house ?" 

Cousin Rachel shook her head. "It belongs 
to those Southerners, I know. They must have 
hidden it here during the war. Probably its 
exact location was forgotten afterward in the 
flight and contusion. I shall find these people 
and give it to them." 

"How can you ?" I smiled incredously. "You 
told me not long since that the man of whom 
you bought the place said that the original 
owners were not living." 

"But their descendants may be," she an- 
swered, and the next day she began her search 
for them. At first so completely had they sev- 
ered all connection with the little town in Mis- 
souri that she could not find the slightest trace 
nf them. But at last she found a clue in New 
York which led to the discovery of a nephew 
who chanced to be the only immediate relative 
living. 

He recognized the jewels as belonging to his 
aunt, whose husband and sons had been killed 
in the war, she herself not long outliving them. 

He took charge of the ornaments prizing 
them for the sake of one long since passed 
away. But the money he would not touch. 
Indeed he had no need of it, as he had amassed 
a comfortable fortune in the foundry business. 

"It is yours," he wrote to aunt Rachel, "keep 
it. It may never have belonged to my aunt." 

"Now you can publish your book, can't 
you ? " I said to Cousin Richel, as we sat dis 
cussing the matter in the little chamber over 
the river, from where we could see the far- 
away Illinois bluffs turning to crimson in the 
sunset. 

"No!" Such a beautiful look came on her 
placid, smiling face, like the peace that was 
falling on the calm, clear river below. "It is 
not mine," she said, simply. 

And what do you think she did with it ? She 
gave it to the trustees of the "Home of the 
Friendless" for the benefit of those poor, dear 



old white-haired ladies, who look so sadly out 
of their dim eyes, and for whom nobody ever 
seems to care, because they have outlived their 
days of love and usefulness. 

But cousin Racnel always did think it was 
more blessed to give than to receive. 



Husbands and Wives. 

Kin tors Press : — The article, "A Farmer's 
Wife," in the Rpral Pkkss of June 20th, like 
a mirror reflected, with the exception of the 
happy ending, the life of more than one weary 
wife, especially of those of the rural com. 
munities. I presume many copies of the 
Rural were opened at that page and placed in 
a conspicuous place for the husband, and after- 
ward some light remark made upon the subject 
in order to find out the impression made upon 
that member of the household; for many a 
weary woman recognized therein the very 
foundation of her discontent and misery. The 
question which naturally arises is this : Why 
should the wife be placed in such an utterly de 
pendent position ? Should a woman have a 
kind considerate husband she is not made to 
feel this dependence, but if a man be only 
thoughtless the story illustrates how gall- 
ing this situation may become, and when a man 
does not care for more than self and his own 
ambitions, what lot is hers '. She is walled in 
with but one gateway ajar, the courts of jus- 
tice. 

If womin, even by man, is considered to be a 
being endowed with common sense and sufficient 
judgment to enable her to manage the details 
of her household, and to take upon herself the 
greatest of responsibilities, that of aiding the 
little ones to properly develop both body and 
mind, is she not capable of deciding what is 
necessary for her family's happiness, comfort 
and health ? 

Generally speaking, can not a woman count 
closer and obtain more real benefit from a given 
amount of money invested than a man? 
Could not a man trust at least a part of his 
earnings to the same hands and judgment 
to which he entrusts his children, or is the 
"Almighty dollar," in his estimation, greater 
than all on earth beside himself ? 

When a man asks a girl to become his wife 
she naturally supposes he will make her his 
companion, helpmeet and partner in all things, 
but too often she realizes that she is not only 
"a slave, but the slave of a slave." So she 
finds upon her shoulders the burden of her 
slcvedom, and most of the burden of slave num- 
ber one added thereon. In nine cases out of 
ten, or you might say iu ninety-nine cases out of 
a hundred, man is a slave to his creditors, and 
quite a number are slaves to "a grasping econ- 
omy," while others are slaves to their own 
bigotry. The last class must be the rulers of 
all they possess; their homeB are monarchies 
and they sit upon the throne; they pride them- 
selves on being prudent and wise; they enter 
into all the little details and their judgment is 
supreme, while they are ever on the alerl for 
fear their "don't tread on me" will be en- 
croached upon. 

But to return to the subject. Why does this 
state of dependence exist V Because the part- 
nership 

"Is but a name, 

A charm that lulls to sleep; 
It follows the fortunate, 
But leaves the wretch to weep." 

The men know this, and some are mean 
enough to take advantage of it, while others, 
to say the least, seem to be very thoughtless. 
They never have any time or means to improve 
tli j home or obtain things for their wives, and 
they know their wives do not possess the power 
to accomplish it themselves. For instance, as 
regards the pleasures of life, the man seeks his 
pleasures when and where he likes; the woman 
(taking for granted she has small children) has 
to ask, can we go here and can we go there, 
knowing that her pleasures depend upon his 
inclination. Should he not feel disposed to give 
her the recreation, she is deprived of her enjoy- 
ment. He is never placed in that position. 
Many wives mentally starve; not so with the 
husbands. He says, "I am going to take such 
and such papers." She, "Can we take such a 
paper or magazine,"and he decides whether the 
money can be so invested or not. Then, in 
reference to the comfort and work. The house- 
wife concludes that they can afford some con- 
veniences in the house, thereby enabling her to 
accomplish her tasks in less time than hitherto 
spent, and then there are also other im- 
provements needed which even health de- 
mands. She argues the time spent in taking 
unnecessary steps could be better employed, 
even to earning back the money so invested. 
If he does not come to the same conclusion, or 
does not feel in the humor to grant her requests, 
are the improvements made? He is very apt 
to say : "Your grandmother or your great- 
grandmother did not have these things, but 
you are always wanting the 'folderols' of the 
age." But let her hint that his predecessors 
did not have the machinery he thinks neces- 
sary, he will soon let her know in actions, if 
not in words, that he earns the money and he 
will invest it as he thinks best. No wonder 
she sometimes thinks she would rather 
be a "hired girl" than a wife; she would 
receive pay for her work and no longer 
be a beggar. Also, when the lord of the man- 
sion would come in he would know better than 



July 25, 1885] 



fACIFie RURAL, fRESS. 



63 



to vent his spleen on her; he could bottle up his 
wrath for his wife. Yet from this very being 
so imposed upon the husband expects not only 
kindness and the utmost consideration for his 
comfort, but even love. But just here is where 
the spring recoils. For, just as sure as water 
falling drop by drop will wear away the hardest 
rock, so these petty tyrauies will exhaust the 
greatest of patience, undermine the deepest 
of love. 

Let us consider one more phase of the situ 
ation. The child is sick; the mother desires 
the physician's attendance; the father thinks he 
is not needed. She is with the child day and 
night, he a few minutes at intervals; yet he 
considers his judgment in the case superior to 
her's, and again is she subject more or less to 
his decision. Thus is not only a woman's hap- 
piness, but her pleasures, her comfort, her and 
her children's health, even the question of life 
and death itself, more or less subject not only 
to her husband's judgment, but to his whims 
and sometimes even to his revengeful spirit. 

Community property is generally considered 
to belong to the wife as much as the husband. 
Let us consider that point. Now, I do not 
speak in reference to the technicalities of the 
law — I am not a lawyer — but as regards the 
condition without appealing to the law. Should 
the husband require money for pleasure, com 
fort or health, he raises it upon his property or 
sells the same. Should the wife require some 
means even to save her or her child's life, does 
she do likewise? He can squander the last cent by 
mismanagement, drinking, gambling, or other- 
wise. Can she prevent it? At death he can will 
it away, down even to the last dollar. Has she 
the same privilege? [In this State the husband 
cannot "will away" more than half of the com- 
munity property— that is, property which has 
been acquired during the period of marriage. — 
Eds. Press. 1 

Then where is the equal partnership? It makes 
me think of the man that said: "What my wife 
has is mine, and what I have is my own." 

Now, the mine and thine should never be 
thought of between man and wife; but if one in- 
sists upon having almost all as mine, there surely 
ought to be a little set aside as thine. One of 
the great drawbacks, especially upon the farm, 
which produces this beggary for the wives, and 
this continual annoyance for the husbands, is 
that all the income goes into one purse for the 
living. Why could not the money made from 
the farm, and the income derived from the 
stock, be made to keep up the farm, and pro- 
vide that which is absolutely necessary for the 
living. The income from the poultry and so 
forth be the fund to be judiciously expended 
for those little pleasures, comforts and im- 
provements about house and yards. A man to 
successfully attend to his business, should not 
be worried with all these little outlays about 
the home; and where something is set by for 
this purpose, the burden could be taken from 
the mans shoulders, and the accompanying 
dread and humiliation of begging from the 
woman's. My opinion is that if the house and 
a few acres surrounding it belonged to the wife, 
the home builder, there would be many 
a happy contented wife, where now there 
is a hopeless, dejected woman ; many a 
bright, cheerful fireside, where now there 
is a gloomy abode. More than one hus- 
band would be greeted with loving smiles, 
where now he is met with peevish complaining. 
Many, many young folks would be at home, 
lightening the burdens of their parents, and 
brightening their lives, who now wander into 
unknown paths, rather than endure the dreari 
ness of home. Observer,. 

HoUisler, San Benito Co., Cat. 




To Be Changed if Restless. — "Robert,"re- 
marked the wife of a penurious man, "I am on 
my death bed. I have tried to be a good and 
faithful wife, and have but one favor to ask of 
you before I die." 

"What is that, Margaret?" 

"You know I was born and raised in Cleve- 
land. It was there I first met you, and the 
happiest hours of our wedded life were spent. 
You remember this, Robert?" 

"Yes" (uneasily). 

"My relatives are all buried there, and when 
I am gone I wish to rest beside them. Will you 
grant me this one favor?" 

"There will be considerable expense attached 
to it." (musingly). 

"Oh, Robert! 1 will never rest easy in my 
grave anywhere else." 

"Well, Maggie, I'll tell you what I'll do. I 
don't want to be mean about the thing. I'll 
bury you here first, and then, if I notice any 
signs of restlessness on your part,l'll take you 
to Cleveland afterward." 

Ivy Against Brick Walls. — The wide- 
spread belief that ivy trained against the walls 
of a house is productive of general unhealthful- 
ness, has been proved to be fallacipus. The 
very opposite is the fact. If any one will care- 
fully examine an ivy-clad wall after a shower, 
he will find it dry and dusty. It will be seen 
that the overlapping leaves have conducted the 
water from point to point until it has reached 
the ground, without wetting the surface of the 
wall. Moreover, the' thirsty roots of the plant 
which force their way into every crevice where 
a firm hold can be obtained, act like suckers, 
and absorb all moisture within reach for their 
own nourishment — the ivy, in fact, acting like 
an overcoat, keeping the house dry, and warm 
as well. It also has the additional virtue of 
covering the ugliest structure with a mantle of 
beauty that is always agreeable to the eye. 



The Puzzle Box. 

Enigma. 

Though somewhat rough and harsh my sound, 
Yet I am smooth and polished much; 

I may be oval, square or round; 
But made to look at, not to touch. 

No mind nor memory I can boast, 

I have no talent to invent; 
And yet, in speculation lost, 

My days are in reflection spent. 

I yield to force, but not to art, 

No flattery can my favor win; 
I tell the truth and play my part 

Whatever frame I may be in. 

I only ask you for a place, 

And not to scratch me or to crack; 
To keep me dry and wipe my face, 

And save the coat upon my back. Anon. 

Buried Authors. 

1. A college in an English university. 

2. A hot-house and skill. 

3. The margin and merit. 

4. A grassy plain and a forest. 

5. A variety of quartz. MAGGIE Fox. 

Riddle. 

Not Cupid's self is more in love lhan I, 
Though in no heart I ever find a place; 

And yet without me love could never be, 
And lovers love my semblance to trace. 

Robin. 

Transformation. 

I am pure, and if you curtail me I will be precious; 
then behead me and I am an English nobleman; 
next curtail me again and I am only a small but use- 
ful organ of the body. Maggie Fox. 

Conundrum. 

1. Where is it that knaves will not steal dia- 
monds ? 

2. What is it that is at once a servile thing and a 
tyrant's scepter; a weapon used in civil (?) war and 
a part of Ihe insignia of the domestic; that is used 
for drilling brigades and for expelling a man from 
his house? Rohin. 

Answers to Last Puzzles. 

Reversals. — 1. Live, evil. 2. Spar, raps. 3. 
Gar, rag. 4. Brag, garb. 5. Spot, tops. 

Two- Word Charade. — Vanity Fair. 

Riddle. — Nothing. 

Palindrome. — Repel a leper. 

Anagrams of Cities. — 1. Syracuse. 2. Roches- 
ter. 3. Schenectady. 4. Sacramento. 

He Spanked the Boy. 

All the passengers in the waiting-room had 
their attention attracted by his antics. He 
wanted candy, and he wanted to see the river, 
and he wanted to go aboard the train, and he 
wanted more than any other city the size of De- 
troit could possibly furnish free gratis. 

His mother hushed him up the bsst she 
could, and several times he slapped her face 
and kicked her shins, and got off without even 
a pinch. 

By and by, an old man who sat near her, and 
whose feet the boy had walked on several 
times, began to get nervous, and, turning to 
his right-hand neighbor, said: 

"Land o' massy ! but I've either got to git 
out o' here, or spank that boy ! " 

"He just achss for it !" growled his neigh- 
bor. 

"He does; he puts me in mind of my Wil- 
liam. I've seen William when nothing on 
airthe but a spanking would put good nature 
into him." 

"I say I will go !" shouted the boy at that 
moment. 

"Please, Johnnie, be good," entreated his 
mother. 
"I won't! " 

"Oh, do! See how they are all looking at 
us." 

"I don't care if they are." 

With that he walked up to the old man and 
made a kick, and then the curtain went up on 
the play. 

With one twist and two motions . he was 
seized, whirled over a pair of knees, a.id before 
he could squawk once the spanking machine 
began its work. If ever a boy of seven was 
neatly wound up, and the ugly taken out of 
him inside of sixty seconds, the work was no 
more complete than in this case. 

"There!" said the spanker, as he up-ended 
the child and placed him on the seat; "you'll 
feel better — a heap better. Hated to do it, you 
know, but saw you were suffering for it. Beg 
your mother's pardon for interfering in fam'ly 
matters, but you set right thar till the train is 
ready." 

The boy "set," and such a calm and solid 
peace stole over the crowd that the yells of the 
hackmen out of doors gave everybody a pain. 

— Detroit Free Press. 



mons are ripe the ram butts the tree until fruit 
enough falls to make him a meal. 

A Glasgow dog went regularly with his 
master to the butcher's to get his dinner. He 
carried a little basket and two pence to pay for 
it. Finally he was allowed to go alone. But 
another butcher soou sent in a bill for the dog's 
daily supply of food. It was ascertained that 
the animal, having a voracious appetite, was 
getting double rations. After he had eaten 
what he received at the first butcher's, he 
would take the empty basket to another and 
eat on credit. 



G5ood J^ealth. 



The Philosophy of Vaccination. 

Prof. Tyndall explains the philosophy of vac- 
cination as follows: When a tree or a bundle 
of wheat or barley straw is burned, a certain 
amount of mineral matter remains in the ashes 
— extremely small in comparison with the bulk 
of the tree or of the straw, but absolutely es- 
sential to its growth. In a soil lacking, 
or exhausted of, the necessary constituents, 
the tree cannot live, the crop cannot grow. 
Now, contagia are living things, which 
demand certain elements of life just as in- 
exorably as trees, or wheat or barley; and 
it is not difficult to see that a crop of 
a given parasite may so far use up a constit- 
uent existing in small quantities in the body, 
but essential in the growth of the parasite, as 
to render the body unfit for the production of a 
second crop. The soil is exhausted, and, un- 
til the lost constituent is restored, the body is 
protected from any further attack from the 
same disorder. Such an explanation of non-re- 
current diseases naturally presents itself to a 
thorough believer in the germ theory, and such 
was the solution which, in reply to a question, 
I ventured to offer nearly 15 years ago to an 
eminent physician. To exhaust a soil, how- 
ever, a parasite less vigorous and destructive 
than the really virulent one may suffice; and, if, 
after having by means of a feebler organism ex- 
hausted the soil, without fatal result, the most 
highly virulent parasite be introduced into the 
system, it will prove powerless. This, in the 
language of the germ theory, is the whole secret 
of vaccination. 



X)ojviESTie Qeopjo^n 



Stories About Animals. — A cat belonging 
to Mrs. Gilbert L. Smith, of Vineyard Haven, 
Mass., sleeps regularly upon a horse's back 
The cat climbs up to a beam over the stall and 
thence drops upon the back of the horse, which 
makes no objection. 

A ram belonging to J. A. Adams, of Gran- 
ville county, North Carolina, knows a perslm 
mon tree when he sees it. When the persiuy- 



Pdt this in Your Pipe. — An English work- 
ingman, just past the middle age, found that 
his pipe, which for many years had been a 
great comfort to him. was beginning to seriously 
affect his nerves. Bsfore giving it up, how- 
ever, he determined to find out it there was no 
way by which he might continue to smoke 
without feeling its effects to an injurious extent. 
He accordingly wrote to a medical journal, and 
was recommended to fill the bowl of the pipe 
one-third full of table- salt, and press the 
tobacco hard down upon it, as in ordinary 
smoking. The result was very satisfactory. 
During the process of smoking the salt solidi- 
fies, while remaining porous, and. when the 
hardened lump is removed at the end of the 
day's smoking, it is found to have absorbed so 
much of the oil of tobacco as to be deeply col- 
ored. The salt should be renewed daily. 

The Oxygen Cure. — Three prominent men 
are stated to have lately tested the "oxygen 
cure." The first drew a long, deep breath from 
the receiver and reported that the sensation 
was delightful; he felt it tingle to the ends of 
his fingers. The second took an inspiration and 
became pale and agitated; he was told that the 
oxygen had found the weak spot in his anatomy. 
The tnird man declared he felt nothing; he 
could take the stuff in all day. Then it was 
discovered that the "Professor" had forgotten 
that morning to connect the tube with the oxy- 
gen reservoir. The patients had been breathing 
ordinary atmospheric air. The imagination 
has very much to do in regard to the effect of 
medicine on the human system. 

A Cholera Preventive.— There is no good 
reason to doubt the truth of the following 
which is woith bearing in mind. During the 
first visit of cholera at St. Petersburg, in 1832 
a firm of iron founders employing 500 men, in- 
formed them that all those who would not take 
a teaspoonful of powdered charcoal on enter 
ing the works in the morning, must leave their 
employ. The consequence was that they did 
not lose a single man, when myriads were dying 
around them. 



The Omelet. — In making an omelet, care 
should be taken that the omelet pan is hot and 
dry. To insure this, put a small quanity of 
lard into the pan, let it simmer a few minutes 
and remove it, wipe the pan dry with a towel 
and put in a little fresh lard, in which the 
omelet may be fried. Care should be taken 
that the lard does not burn, which would spoil 
the color of the omelet. It is better to make 
two or three small omelets than one very large 
one, as the latter cannot be well handled by a 
novice. The omelet made of three eggs is the 
one recommended for beginners. Break the 
eggs separate; put them into a bowl and whisk 
thoroughly with a fork. The longer they are 
beaten the lighter will the omelet be. Beat up 
a teaspoonful of milk with the eggs and con- 
tinue to beat until the last moment before 
pouring in'o the pan, which should be over a 
hot fire. As soon as the omelet sets, remove 
the pan from the hottest part of the fire. Slip 
a knife under it to prevent sticking to the pan. 
When the center is almost firm, slant the pan, 
work the omelet in shape to fold easily and 
neatly, and when slightly browned hold a plat- 
ter against the edge of the pan and deftly turn 
it out on to the hot dish. Salt mixed with the 
eggs prevents them from rising, and when it is 
so used the omelet will look flabby, yet without 
salt it will taste insipid. Add a little salt to it 
just before folding it and turning out on the 
dish. 

An Economical Dish. — Wash a ca'f's liver; 
remove the skin and cut off the white fat from 
the under side. Lard the upper side with fat 
salt pork. Brown in a baking pan two table- 
spoonfuls of flour in hot butter or drippings; 
place the liver in the pan and let it brown on 
both sides. Add one carrot cut in halves, one 
onion in which six cloves have been stuck, one 
bay leaf and the rind of a lemon. Pour three 
cups of water or broth in the pan and bake for 
half an hour, basting often. Then add one tea- 
spoonful of vinegar and one of lemon juice, and 
salt and pepper; baste two or three times. 
Strain the gravy over the liver, garnish with 
round slices of lemon and serve. The following 

fried herbs" are served with the liver: Four 
handfuls of young spinach, two of young let- 
tuce and two of handfuls of parsley, well 
washed and drained. Chop fine and add one 
handful of young onions, well minced. Put 
them in a saucepan with one ounce of butter 
and some pepper and salt. Cover the pan and 
put it on the fire, shaking it until the herbs are 
tender. Garnish the liver with them. 



Wash the Head. — A distinguished medical 
authority says that keeping the head clean is a 
great aid to health. A distinguished physician, 
who has spent much of his time at quarantine, 
said that a person whose head was thoroughly 
washed every day rarely ever took contagious 
diseases, but when the hair was allowed to be- 
come dirty and matted, it was hardly possible 
to escape infection. Many persons find relief 
for nervous headache by washing the head in 
weak soda water. 



Light and Heat. — Evidences of the sanitary 
value of sunlight is afforded by the recent ex 
periments in France of Mons. E. Duclaux, who 
finds that the light of the sun, in its action on 
germs, is fifty times as destructive as its heat. 

Effect of Morphine on the Hair and 
Teeth. — It is claimed that the habitual use of 
morphine produces baldness and loosens the 
teeth. 



A Wasted Salad Herb. — One of the best 
salad herbs goes to waste as a weed and pest of 
the garden. Children know enough to eat sour 
grass with its tender acid leaf. French cooks 
number it among the most excellent field salads, 
and doctors say it is soothing for the blood, 
preventing rheumatic and gouty disorders. It 
ought to be brought to market by the bushel, 
for every field has patches of it and it is better 
than spinach or sorrel for purees and bonne 
femme soups, or it may be stewed with sugar 
in porcelain as a delicate order of pieplant. 



Surprise Eggs. — One dozen eggs, hard boiled ; 
one teaspoonful of vinegar, three small pickles, 
chopped; one teaspoonful of made mustard, 
ham, lobster or chicken, chopped; season with 
salt, pepper and melted butter; a little chopped 
celery; cool the eggs in cold water and remove 
the shells; cut lengthwise, not quite through; 
take six of the yolks, chopped meat, celery, 
vinegar and seasoning, and mix well together; 
fill the boiled whites with the mixture, care- 
fully closing again. Garnish with celery leaves 
or parsley. 

Farmers' Fruit Cake. — Soak three cups of 
dried apples over night in warm water; chop 
slightly in the morning and then simmer two 
hours or more in two cups of molasses until the 
apples resemble citron. Make a cake of two 
eggs, one cup sugar, one cup sweet milk, three- 
fourths cup butter, one and a half teaspoons 
soda, flour to make a rather thick batter, spice 
in plenty; put in the apples and bake in a quick 
oven. This is very nice. 



Orange Float.— One quart water, the juice 
and pulp of two lemons, one coffeecup sugar. 
When boiling hot, add four tablespoons corn- 
starch. Let boil 15 minutes, stirring all the 
time. When cold, pour it over four or five 
oranges that have been sliced into a glass dish, 
and over the top spread the beaten whites of 
three eggs, sweetened and flavored with vanilla. 

Potato Pancakes. —These mak<> an excellent 
supper dish. (irate a dozen medium-sized 
peeled potatoes. Add the yolks of three eggs, 
a heaping tablespoonful of flour, with a large tea- 
spoonful of salt, and lastly the whites of three 
eggs beaten stiff, and thoroughly incorporated 
with the potatoes. Fry the cakes in butter and 
lard (equal parts) until they are brown. 

A Savory Dish of Rice.— Boil half a pound 
of rice in water until half done, and then boil 
in milk un it it is very soft and thick; add a 
small tablespoonful of butter, and sugar and 
grated lemon peel to taste. When cold, form 
into oval balls, roll in egg add finely-sifted 
"zwieback" crumbs and fry a delicate brown in 
hot butter. Serve with wine, vanilla or truit 
sauce. 




pACIFie RURAb PRESS. 



[Jolt 25, 1885 



ilL 

A. T. DEWEY. W. B- KWER. 

Published by DEWEY & CO. 



Office, S5S Market St., N. E.cor. Front Sl.,S. F. 
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SCIENTIFIC PRFSS PA TEST AUESCY. 
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A . T. DEW KT W. B. EWER. O. H. STRONG. 



probability till out the measure of his life. Let j attention to the statements with any special re- 
his last moments be tranquil. Let him who | flection upon the intentions of this firm, but 
loDged for peace when the great war was done merely to show the behavior which is likely to 



now pass ou into the possession of that peace 
which passeth understanding! 



The Conflict in the Fruit Market. 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

Saturday, July 25, 1885. 



TABLE OP CONTENTS. 

EDITORIALS- -Beet Sugar in California; Foed 
lirains Again, 57. The Week; The Conflict in the 
Fruit Market; Mr. Brewer's Shorthorns, 64. An CM- 
New Pear; A Great Stock Growers' Meeting; Orchards 
Straight and Mixed; Tne Beet Sugar Industry, 65. 

ILLUSTRATIONS. Beet Sugar Factor; at Alva- 
redo, Alameda County, Oat.; Twenty Thousand Tons of 
Sugar Beets at the Facto'y In Alvarado, 57. The 
Lawgon I'ear, 65. 

CORRESPONDENCE. - Arizona Notes; Stony 
Creek Region, Colusa County, 58 

THE APIARY, starting in the Bee Business. -No. 
<;; Sii k Bees, 58- 

POULTRY YARD. -Hints to • Beginner; The 
Chicken Business, 59. 

THE STOCK YARD. -The HolsVm ('ow.-No. 1; 
Eastern Feeling on Jersevs, 50. 

HORTICULTURE. California Fruit at the East; 
Peen-to Peaches, 59. 

PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY.- Teiuescal 
Grange Report on San Francisco Girls' Union; Sin Jo.e 
Orange and Assessments: The Sacramento Grangers 
and Fruit Growers; Action by Sonoma Pomona Grange; 
The San Jose fcniit Fair; Santa Kosa Fair; Resolutions 
of Respect; Lodi Grange; Valley Orange; Teiuescal 
Grange, 60. 

AGRICULTURAL NOTES -From the various 
counties of California, 60- 

ENTOMOLOGICAL Grasshoppers and the Codlin 
Hath. 61. 

THE HOME CIRCLE.— Exhumo; Cousin Rachel; 

Husbands and Wives, 62. 
YOUNG FOLKS' COLUMN. The Puzzle Box; 

He Spanked the Boy; Stories About Animals, 63. 
GOOD HEALTH. -The Philosophy of Vaccination; 

Put this in Your Pipe; The Oxygen Cure; A Cholert 

Preventive; Wash the Head; Light and He*t; Effect of 

Morphine on the Hair and Teeth, 63. 
DOMESTIC ECONOMY. -Various Recipes. 63. 

Business Announcements. 

Agricultural Implements— Baker & Hamilton, S. F. 

Wire— California Wire Works, S. F. 

Garden Hose, Lamps, etc. -Thos. Da\ A; Co., S. F. 

Concrete Apparatus- -Kansome, S. F. 

Sheep -Kirkpatrick & Whittaker, Knight's Ferry. 

The Home Seminary -San Jose, Cal. 

Hosiery — California Hosiery Co., S. F. 

Ileal Estate tn Exchange J. J. Young, S. F. 

Machinery— Joshua Hendy Machine Works, S. F. 

tS"Sev Advertising Columns. 



The Week. 



The week has been quiet in every way. 
Neither weather, nor public nor private affairs 
have afforded topics of especial interest. Mid- 
summer <iuiet still holds sway, and the disposi- 
tion of people toward vacation-takiDg is still 
noticeable. The opening of the public schools 
in the city and suburban towns is, however, a 
warniDg that the summer is ending. Next week 
most of the private schools and seminaries will 
collect their groups of lads and misses. 

Business is quiet, although most produce 
values are hardening and a good outlook for 
better prices is the only consolation for the very 
moderate returns which the fields are making. 
The compensation is slight because it is appear- 
ing that the rumors which have been rife of the 
cereals "turning out much better than ex- 
pected" have not carried much truth. It now 
appears as though all estimates of the aggregate 
production have been greater than the fact. 
The telegraph this afternoon brings notes of 
business prospects improving in the leading 
Hasten) cities and of fair expectations for the 
fall trade. 

As we go to press ou Wednesday evening 
telegrams are coming to indicate that Uen. 
liraut is now surely upon the edge of the dark 
river, and that a few hours will in all human 



It is evident that there will be a sort of a 
conflict waged between dealers in California 
fruits and producers who desire to deal directly 
with Kasteru jobbers or consumers. We are 
not alarmists and we do not announce the fact 
for the purpose of denouncing anybody or to 
place upon record forebodings of evils. Our 
impression is that the fruit interest will prove 
'arge enough to keep busy all who desire to 
enlist their energies iu it, and that the distribu- 
tion of the product profitably may require the 
earnest work of all dealers who handle the pro- 
duct of others and of all producers who pro- 
pose to be their own shippers and merchants. 
There should be a free field in this matter, and 
if any strife comes it should be such as can be 
conducted within the limits of a generous 
rivalry, with a common purpose which should 
not be lost sight of, to wit, the extension of the 
demand and consumption of California fruit pro- 
ducts. The most prominent efforts on the part 
of growers to advance their own interests are 
the one at Sacramento, of which we have made 
frequent mention, and another in Los Angeles 
county with special reference to raisins, of 
which information is given on page CO of this 
issue. These efforts are not in conflict with the 
work of the regular dealers, except in that they 
promise to free the growers from absolute de- 
pendence upon the dealers who are generally 
unaMe to resist the tempta'ion to monopolistic 
behavior when they see that the grower can do 
nothing except through them. There is no 
question about it, growers are wise to prepare 
themselves to escape the ill consequences which 
would naturally follow if they had but a single 
outlet for their product and that through the 
fruit stores of San Francisco, Sacramento and 
Los Angeles. The disposition to combination 
and corners is so clearly defined that growers 
arv wise to keep their interests in the open 
field as far as they are able. The Orange raisin 
growers state the fact in the report which is 
given on page 110 when they say : "Without 
an organization of some kind the business will 
remain as it is now. K istern dealers will never 
come here to buy mixed lots in sweat boxes, 
consequently there will be nothing left for us 
to do but to sell to local buyers for the prices 
they choose to offer." This is just the corner 
which the fruit product of this State should 
keep itself free from. There is nothing in- 
tended which shall s'and in the way of the 
dealers ob'aininp all they can profitably handle, 
and of increasing their trade as rapidly as they 
can: but to allow dealers to concentrate the 
stock, to buy low because growers are at their 
mercy and sell high because they have the 
stock in control, that is just the kind of trade 
which would prevent the general extension of 
the consumption of California fruits, would im- 
poverish the growers and enrich the specula- 
tors. Such a state must not be permitted in 
this State. 

We have said the efforts now gaining head- 
way among the growers are not aimed at less- 
ening the trade of the regular merchants. On 
this point the sentiment of the Sacramento 
meetings is thus expressed: "It was distinctly 
avowed that the purpose of the organization 
was not iu any manner to wage war upon com- 
mission merchants or others, but to contend 
with present conditions, and by an active effort 
seek to enlarge the markets for our fruits by 
extending the area over which they are now 
sold at the Kast." It may be said, then, where 
is the chance for the conflict in the fruit trade? 
It will certainly not come from the growers. 
That is quite true, and if the dealers were just 
as generous and far-seeing, and could under- 
stand what must be plain to any unprejudiced 
mind that these efforts on the part of the grow- 
ers must also result in the extension of the 
dealer's l< gilimatv trade even while it makes 
over-smartness on their part impossible, there 
would indeed be no conflict. Hut we can hardly 
expect dealers to be so sensible, if we can judge 
from utterances which appear in the circular of 
one of our leading firms of dried fruit dealers 
a circular which we expect was intended for 
Kastern perusal and has probably been sent out 
generally to Kastern dealers. We do not call 



be adopted by the gentlemen upon the dealers' 
side of the interest. This choice literary gem 
occurs under the head of "Bleached Apricots" 
in the circular: 

(^uite a large quantity is being produced this 
year iu several sections of the State. If the 
suggestion which we made some time since to 
Kisteru dealers, to let the countrymen alone 
and deal through regular trade channels where 
there is a competition, is heeded, these goods 
should and can be bought at figures which will 
place them within reach. It is likely, however, 
that many Kastern buyers will jump in again 
tiiis year as before, and pay the country pro- 
ducer anywhere fro'n §1,000 to $1,500 a car 
profit, which was exactly what was dune iast 
year. This will, of course, prevent decent op- 
erations on this side. 

"Let the countrymen alone" is certainly a 
neat expression from a leading firm which owes 
whatever prosperity it has to the enterprise of 
the " countrymen " in developing a production 
of material for them to handle. " Uecent 
operations " is another choice phrase -signify- 
ing that all the efforts which are being made by 
growers to extend the fame and consumption of 
our fine dried apricots, are indecent. Wheu 
such a disposition crops out, does it not argue a 
conflict? Dies anyone suppose that producers 
will allow themselves to be stigmatized in such 
a way ? 

This same circular has a somewhat original 



Mr. Brewer's Shorthorns. 

Some time ago we received from .1. A. 
Krewer, of Centerville, Alameda county, a few 
notes on the present condition and numbers 
of his herd of Shorthorn cattle. The herd 
was bought from Mr. M. B. Sturges, about 
a year ago, as some of our readers may remem- 
ber, the transaction being reported in our col- 
umns about the time the sale was made. Mr. 
Sturges bred and kept his cattle with particular 
reference to their milking qualities, and we 
presume that Mr. Brewer intends following the 
same plan of breeding. 

The herd now numbers 1.'! head, nine cows 
and heifers and four bulls and bull calves. The 
bull in use, Kowena's Duke of Airdrie 2d, 
49,213, now three years old, is red and white> 
bred by Wm. B. Dodge, Wankegan, Illinois, 
and traces to imported Minna by Bridegroom 
(11,203). The cows and heifers are of three 
different families. Mr. Brewer gives the names 
of three, viz., Lucy Ann, 2d, Lucy Ann, 3d and 
Lucy Ann, 4th, that are descended from im- 
ported Caroline by Dashwood, 9,763. They are 
full sisters, got by Duchess Prince, 50,819, a 
sou of Uwynne Prince, 39,201, who was bred 
by Mr. II. Ashburner, of Baden, San Miteo 
county, Duchess Prince was out of Duchess 
of York, 13th, by imported Sheriff (29,964). 
Lucy Ann, 2d, is a 3-year old, the other two 
are twins, a year younger. We presume that 
their dam, Lucretia, is still in the herd. She 



way of aiding growers to get a good price for was bred by Mr. Sturges. and is a grand- 



their raisins. Importers of Spanish raisins 
ought to thank the San Francisco firm for ad- 
vising Kasteru dealers not to stock up with 
California fruit until they have a chance to get 
their fruit in. >Ve quote : 

Unless something now unlooked for occurs, 
we shall have the largest crop of raisins ever 
produced in California. It is estimated that 
the product will reach 400,000 boxes, and by 
some as high as 430,000 boxes. The outturn 
last year was about 175,000 boxes. The vast 
increase will therefore be noticed, and while 
some attempt will no doubt be made to "boom" 
prices on account of the so called cholera scare 
in Spain, there is no doubt in our mind that 
Kastern dealers who maintain a level head, and 
decline to purchase or contract until the fruit is 
ready for actual delivery, and samples have 
been submitted, will find it puts dollars in their 
pockets. Our advice is, to buy California 
raisins this year only as you need. It is known 
the crop is heavy, and we look for low prices. 

We submit that these statements are some- 
what at variance with the true interests of pro- 
ducers, and therefore we call atten ion to them 
and to the spirit which incites them. For- 
tunately Kasteru dealers are generally men 
of insight and are shrewd. They will buy 
what suits them and do not have 
prejudices against buying of "countrymen." 
They are not likely to be favorably im- 
pressed with a circular which apparently has 
for its purpose to eulist them in a conspiracy 
against the producers. They have no interest 
in having the goods they want reach them 
through a city resurrection establishment. 

We trust no more such circulars will be pre- 
pared. The growers are proceeding with their 
efforts, not upon the basis of destroying the 
dealers, and it is unfair as it is unwise for a 
dealer to attempt to bring discredit on produc- 
ers by the unkind and unjust reflections to 
which we have alluded. 

A Big Cedar Tree. --If any of our readers 
are not inclined to believe the following story, 
they can say that the On -goninn, of Portland, 



daughter of Lucy Ann. 1 0th, the cow bought 
by him of Messrs. .fones & Co., of Sin .lose, 
some ten years ago. 

There are three descendants of imported 
Young Mary by .lapiter (2,170), viz., Oxford 
Mary, bred by Jones ft I lagan, by Oxford Duke 
27,386, and her two daughters, Lady Mary 4th 
and Lady Mary 5th, both by Duchess Prince, 
the bull mentioned above. Rose of Summer 
8th by imported Sheriff (29,9641, was bred by 
S. B. Kmerson of Mountain Yiew, Santa Clara 
Co., and bought of him by Mr. Sturges when a 
young heifer. She has been a regular and good 
breeder, and is also a good milker, being of a 
family of Shorthorns well known for their good 
milking qualities. She is a descendant of Anna- 
bclla b\ Mijor, imported from Knglaudin 1824. 
Mr. Brewer does not say whether he has any 
heifers from her or not. Iu Vol. 25th, A. H. 
B., there are a daughter and grand daughter, 
viz., Rose of Alameda, calved in 1879 by 
Master Mayuard, and her daughter Hose of 
Alameda 2], calved January 15, 1882, by 
Duchess Prince, both bred by Mr. Sturges, and 
both are probably still in the herd. 

Not having seen the herd, we confine our 
notes mainly to the pedigrees and breeding of 
the animals, just to give those who are inter- 
ested iu such things an idea of the material the 
herd is made up of. We cannot comment on 
the good or bad qualities of the animals them- 
selves without having seen them, therefore we 
leave that part of it to those who have the 
desire to see for themselves. The herd is quite 
accessible, as Centerville is but two miles from 
Niles Junction, on the railroad. 



A Novelty in Bouse Moving. — A large 
frame barn was last week brought down intact 
from Ban Joaquin county to Novato Meadows, 
iu Marin county. It was purchased by Mr. 
Ferris of Mr. H. D. Bacon, loaded on a barge 
in Olo river and towed 100 miles to its present 
site. The strange appearance excited great 
t: "Over at Yaquina bay there is a I curiosity all down the river and past the busier 
fallen cedar tree eight feet through, which must | neighborhoods of Port Costa and Bemcia. 
have lain there a long time, by the fact that 



two trees have grown over it, one six feet in 
circumference having two roots that reaoh 
down into the ground, one on each side of the 
log, the other five feet through that has three 
roots running into the earth. The fallen log is 
perfectly sound aa when first it fell " 



There was, of course, considerable risk attending 
the step, as so large a surface exposed to the 
wind would have beeu dangerous in a storm, 
but the elements were propitious and no diffi- 
culty of any kind was encountered. 



The "Big Worms" of Minnesota well de- 
serve the name, for they cover live thousand 
square miles, or 3,200,000 acres of surface. 
These woods contain only hard wood growths, 
including white and black oak, maple, hickory, 
basewood, elm, cottonwood, tamarack, and 
enough other varieties to make an aggregate of 
over 50 different kinds. The hard-wood tract 
extends in a belt across the middle of the State, 
and surrounding its northeastern corner is an 
immense pine region covering 21,000 square 
miles, or 13,440,000 acres. 



Cutting Government Timukr. — I'nited 
States I district Attorney Hilborn, on behalf of 
the (iovernment, has instituted legal proceed- 
ings in the United States Circuit Court against 
C. lluffmeister, to recover 5250, the value of 
timber claimed to have been cut upon (Iovern- 
ment land in Colusa county. 

AMKKIi AN LrMIIEil Foil AsriNWAI.L. — It U 

reported that D. C. Bicon & Co., of Savannah, 
< -x., have closed a contract with the New York 
agents of the merchants of Aspinwall for fur- 
nishing a large quantity of lumber to rebuild 
that city. The contract calls for the delivery 
of 75,000 to 100,000 feet per day. 



Joly 25, 1885.] 



fACIFie RURAb f RESS 



65 



An Old-New Pear. 

We doubt if there ever was a pear which 
must be called new to the general pomology of 
the country with so long and interesting a his- 
tory as the fruit shewn in the engraving on this 
page. The original Liwson pear tree, supposed 
to be 100 years old, and bearing the impress of 
ages, is s ill healthy, growing in the cleft of a 
rock in the Ulster county, New York, on 
the west bank of the Hudson river, 250 feet 
above its level. It is locate 1 on a part of the 
farm which formerly belonged to John Lawson, 
the elder, who first brought it into public no- 
tice by grafting and planting orchards of the 
young trees and sending the fruit to New York 
markets, where, on account of i s earliuess and 
great beauty, it attracted much attention, and 
was generally called Lawson's E irly, Lawson's 
Beauty and other prefixes to the owner's name, 
and sold readily at high prices, which increased 
as the pear became better known. It is the or- 
iginal stock from which all pear trees of this va- 
riety have been grown. It takes its name from 
John Lawson, the elder, who, during his 
lifetime, owned and occupied the plantation on 
which it grew and is yet standing. At the de- 
cease of Mr. Liwson the farm with the original 
tree and those grown from it descended to his 
children, then to his grandchildren, who still 
own and occupy the premises, never having 
disposed of any trees, buds or scions with the 
privilege of propagation, tor sale or distribution, 
as its early ripening, handsome color and fine 
appearance, rendered it a very profitable pear 
for market, and sold last summer in New York 
from $2.50 to $4 per one half bushel; yet the 
Liwsons generously gave to some neighbors and 
others grafts to grow for their own use, but not 
for sale. Sj that the distribution of this valu- 
able early pear was substantially restricted and 
kept within control of the Lawson family until 
recently, when, for a valuable consideration, 
the exclusive privilege to propagate and sell 
them to the public under the name of Lawson 
pear, was conveyed to William Parry, of the 
Pomona Nurseries, Parry, New Jersey, by con- 
tract in writing signed by all the heirs. 

The tree is a vigorous, upright grower, with 
clean, healthy foliage, much resembling the 
Early Harvest .and Jefferson in appearance and 
habit of growth. In an existence of 100 years 
it has never been affected with blight or other 
disease, and is still healthy. 

The daughter of John Lawson, the elder, a 
lady well advanced in years, remembers the 
original tree growing on her father's plantation 
more than .30 years ago, and it was an old tree 
then. 

The young trees are very productive and soon 
commence bearing. As the engraving shows, 
the fruit is large for an early pear: many 
specimens measure nine inches around and some 
more; lirm and a good shipper; most beautiful 
crimson color on yellow ground. The flesh is 
crisp, juicy and pleasant, though not best in 
quality. The Lawson ripens in central New 
York from the middle of July to the first of 
August, and at the South is expected to ripen 
so early as to be of much profit as an early pear. 

The pear tree that has braved the winter's 
blast, and resisted insect enemies for a century 
past, yielding bounteous crops of elegant fruit, 
deserves a place on record, and the good name 
of the family to whose care we are indebted for 
this beautiful pear, should always be attached 
to it, and not be exchanged for another merely 
to suit propagators. Like the Seckle pear 
tree, which is more than 200 years old, and now 
standing within the limits of the city of Phila- 
delphia, that takes its name from Lawrence 
Seckle, a former owner, who first introduced it 
to public notice on coming into possession of 
the farm on which it grew, although he found 
it a full-grown, prolific-bearing tree when he 
bought the property. 



Forest Denudation.— From the report of 
the chief of the forestry bureau for 1884 the 
startling extent of forest denudation is made 
more apparent. In Pennsylvania fully 70 per 
cent of the original forest area has been cleared. 
Iowa has lost 40 per cent of her forest area, 
Minnesota 17 per cent, Indiana 55 per cent, 
Illinois GO per cent and Wisconsin (iO per cent. 

Eastern Timber Purchasers in the Si- 
erra. — It is stated that a company of Michigan 
lumbermen are negotiating for the purchase of 
70,000 acres of timber land in the Sierra. 



A Great Stock Growers' Meeting. 

Perhaps the greatest agricultural meetings of 
the day in the Western Stntes are those held 
by the stock growers. The live stock interest, 
always a great one at the West, has now be- 
come imn.ense, as facts and figures frequently 
given in the Rural have shown. The stimulus 
given to the production of beef by the large 
consumption along the Eastern seaboard and by 
shipment abroad, has been felt even as far 
west as the Sierra Nevadas. The month of 
November in Chicago is a time when horns and 
hoofs are the supreme topic in ihe great me- 
tropolis of the West. Then comes the fat stock 
shows, which for seven years have a tracted 
such wide attention. For the last two years a 
great convention of cattle men has been held 
during the fairs. This year there will be the 
Eighth Annual Fat Stock Show, and the Third 
Annual Convention of the National Cattle 
Growers' Association, during the third week in 
November, the latter meeting occupying two 
days, November 17th and 18th. 

The conven'ion will be composed of delegates 
duly appointed by the cattle growers', breed- 
ers' and dairymen's asscciatious and socie ier, 
State Boards of agriculture, agr'caltural tol- 



Orchards Straight and Mixed. 

Editors PRESS:— In Mr. Coates' article in the 
Press of July i8ih, I find one part that may d 
more harm than good. He says it is useless to plant 
less than 10 acres of any one kind of fruit. If Mr. 
Coates means that for the io or 20-acre fruit-grower 
he will have to give some better reasons. The first 
objection is ihat the small fruit-grower is not able to 
march an army of 20 or 30 men into an apricot 
or prune orch <rd for 10 or 20 day.-, and then have 
no fruit for the rest of the year. Again, if he should 
make a mistake, as I did, and put out 10 acres of 
late Crawford peaches instead of 50 trees, he would 
get his eyes opened. I would wai n all beginners 
not to plant more than can be handled by two or 
three men and plant so that varieties ripening will 
follow each other. If others in Ihe neighborhood 
do the Same, I see no trouble in loading cars, sup- 
plying canneries or driers, and all without any rush 
or loss to anyone. Another reason is, so many va- 
rieties do well in one plac- and fail in another. It 
would be a risk no 2o-acrc farmer should take to 
plant all one thing; but 10 the large fruit-grower 
with a fat bank account il would be good advice — 
C. H. M , Pomona. 

Our correspondent above and Mr. Coates 
have looked upon the fruit problem from differ- 
ent points of view and b >th have advised cor- 
rectly according to his premise-'. Neither Mr. 
Coates nor anyone else knowing anything of 
the fruit business in this State would advise a 
large plantation of anything in an untried lo- 
cality. In the older regions, where the larger 





THE LAWSON PEAR. 



leges, and the agricultural press of all parts of 
the United States, (ireat Britain and the 
Canadas, and also of delegates at large, ap- 
pointed especially by the governors to represent 
the cattle interests of the several States and 
Territories. 

The object of the convention is to induce 
and afford opportunity for full and free discus- 
sion of the various interests of the cattle and 
kindred industries, and consideration of any 
important problems connected with the cattle 
business, including the best methods of breed- 
ing, maturing and marketing neat cattle and 
their several products. To this end careful re- 
ports have been prepareel upon various subjects, 
each report being from a special committee 
composed of gentlemen eminently fitted by ex 
parience to treat the matter* referred to them. 
Full and free debate upon the subject of each 
report, by those entitled to the privileges of 
the floor, is expected and elesired. A number 
of gentlemen, who are prominently identified 
and familiar with the cattle and kindred inter- 
ests, have baen invited and are expected to ad- 
dress the convention upon themes of importance. 

The privilege of the floor is restricted to dele- 
gates appointed by local organizations of stock 
growers, agricultural associations, etc., as 
stated above. Those desiring to attend would 
do well to secure credentials from some of the 
bodies entitled to issue them. We trust the 
Pacific Coast may be represented. 



There are 500,000 quarters more of wheat 
on the passage to Great Britain than at this 
date last year. 



orchards are, it can be told to a certainty what 
fr.iits sue caed and what varieties of them do 
best. Of course, there is always a question as 
to which may do best in market when the trees 
begin to bear, and that risk the large planttr 
has to assume. There is no question that in 
making sales for Eastern shipment or to can- 
ners, there is a decided advantage in having 
straight lots of uniform goods of considerable 
extent. It is with fruit as with commodities 
dealt in by wholesale. The planting of the 
same list of varieties by a large number of small 
growers so that the aggregate of each variety 
may be large, will not quite answer the same 
purpose, as no contract can be made to cover a 
large lot. If any one doubts it let him start in 
and try